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Listed 100 (total found 141) sub titles with search on: Mythology for wider area of: "SOUTH AEGEAN Region GREECE" .


Mythology (141)

Ancient myths

KEA (Island) KYKLADES

Acontius & Cydippe

Cydippe (Kudippe). The heroine of a very popular Greek love-story, which was treated by Callimachus in a poem now unfortunately lost. The later Greek prose romances were founded upon this version. Cydippe was the daughter of a well-born Athenian. It happened that she and Acontius, a youth from the island of Ceos, who was in love with her, had come at the same time to a festival of Artemis at Delos. Cydippe was sitting in the temple of Artemis when Acontius threw at her feet an apple on which was written, "I swear by the sanctuary of Artemis that I will wed Acontius." Cydippe took up the apple and read the words aloud, then threw it from her and took no notice of Acontius and his addresses. After this her father wished on several occasions to give her in marriage, but she always fell ill before the wedding. The father consulted the Delphic oracle, which revealed to him that the illness of his daughter was due to the wrath of Artemis, by whose shrine she had sworn and broken her oath. He accordingly gave her to Acontius in marriage.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Acontius (Akontios), a beautiful youth of the island of Ceos. On one occasion he came to Delos to celebrate the annual festival of Diana, and fell in love with Cydippe, the daughter of a noble Athenian. When he saw her sitting in the temple attending to the sacrifice she was offering, he threw before her an apple upon which he lad written the words "I swear by the sanctuary of Diana to marry Acontius." The nurse took up the apple and handed it to Cydippe, who read aloud what was written upon it, and then threw the apple away. But the goddess had heard her vow, as Acontius had wished. After the festival was over, he went home, distracted by his love, but he waited for the result of what had happened and took no further steps. After some time, when Cydippe's father was about to give her in marriage to another man, she was taken ill just before the nuptial solemnities were to begin, and this accident was repeated three times. Acontius, informed of the occurrence, hastened to Athens, and the Delphic oracle, which was consulted by the maiden's father. declared that Diana by the repeated illness meant to punish Cydippe for her perjury. The maiden then explained the whole affair to her mother, and the father was at last induced to give his daughter to Acontius. This story is related by Ovid (Heroid. 20, 21; comp. Trist. iii. 10. 73) and Aristaenetus (Epist. x. 10), and is also alluded to in several fragments of ancient poets, especially of Callimachus, who wrote a poem with the title Cydippe. The same story with some modifications is related by Antoninus Liberalis (Metam. 1) of an Athenian Hermocrates and Ctesylla.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Sep 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Cydippe to Acontius: P. Ovidius Naso, The Epistles of Ovid


Acontius to Cydippe: P. Ovidius Naso, The Epistles of Ovid



KOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Asteria

Daughter of Coeus and Phoebe, to avoid Zeus plunges into the sea and is transformed into a quail.


Ctesylla

Ctesylla (Ktesulla), a beautiful maiden of the island of Cos, of whom and Hermochares Antoninus Liberalis (Met. 1) relates nearly the same story which other writers relate of Cydippe and Acontius. Buttmann (Mythol. ii.) thinks that Ctesylla was originally an attribute of some ancient national divinity at Ceos -Aphrodite Ctesylla was worshipped there- who was believed to have had some love affair with a mortal.


NAXOS (Island) KYKLADES

Dionysus and the pirates

...And wishing (Dionysus) to be ferried across from Icaria to Naxos he hired a pirate ship of Tyrrhenians. But when they had put him on board, they sailed past Naxos and made for Asia, intending to sell him. Howbeit, he turned the mast and oars into snakes, and filled the vessel with ivy and the sound of flutes. And the pirates went mad, and leaped into the sea, and were turned into dolphins. Thus men perceived that he was a god and honored him; and having brought up his mother from Hades and named her Thyone, he ascended up with her to heaven (Apollod. 3.5.3)

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Acoetes (Akoites), according to Ovid (Met. iii. 582, &c.) the son of a poor fisherman in Maeonia, who served as pilot in a ship. After landing at the island of Naxos, some of the sailors brought with them on board a beautiful sleeping boy, whom they had found in the island and whom they wished to take with them; but Acoetes, who recognised in the boy the god Bacchus, dissuaded them from it, but in vain. When the ship had reached the open sea, the boy awoke, and desired to be carried back to Naxos. The sailors promised to do so, but did not keep their word. Hereupon the god showed himself to them in his own majesty: vines began to twine round the vessel, tigers appeared, and the sailors, seized with madness, jumped into the sea and perished. Acoetes alone was saved and conveyed back to Naxos, where he was initiated in the Bacchic mysteries and became a priest of the god. Hyginus (Fab. 134), whose story on the whole agrees with that of Ovid, and all the other writers who mention this adventure of Bacchus, call the crew of the ship Tyrrhenian pirates, and derive the name of the Tyrrhenian sea from them. (Comp. Horn. Hymn. in Bacch: Apollod. iii. 5.3; Seneca, Oed. 449.)


Alcimedon. One of the Tyrrhenian sailors, who wanted to carry off the infant Dionysus from Naxos, but was metamorphosed, with his companions, into a dolphin. (Ov. Met. iii. 618; Hygin. Fab. 134)


Phaethon

Son of the Sun or of Cephalus and Day, his sisters bewail his fate beside the Eridanus, statue of Phaethon in chariot.


Phaethon "the shining". A name that occurs in Homer as an epithet or surname of Helios (the Sun), and is used by later writers as a proper name for Helios; but it is more commonly known as the name of a son of Helios by the Oceanid Clymene, the wife of Merops. The genealogy of Phaethon, however, is not the same in all writers, for some call him a son of Clymenus, the son of Helios by Merope, or a son of Helios by Prote, or, lastly, a son of Helios by the nymph Rhode or Rhodos. He received the significant name of Phaethon from his father, and was afterwards presumptuous and ambitious enough to request his father to allow him, for one day, to drive the chariot of the sun across the heavens. Helios was induced, by the entreaties of his son and of Clymene, to yield; but the youth being too weak to check the horses, they rushed out of their usual track, and came so near the earth as almost to set it on fire. Thereupon Zeus killed him with a flash of lightning, and hurled him down into the river Eridanus. His sisters, the Heliades or Phaethontiades, who had yoked the horses to the chariot, were metamorphosed into poplars, and their tears into amber.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Aegle

Aegle. A sister of Phaeton, and daughter of Helios and Clymene. (Hygin. Fab 154, 156.) In her grief at the death of her brother she and her sisters were changed into poplars.


Apemosyne

Daughter of Catreus, loved by Hermes, with his brother Althaemenes set out from Crete to Rhodes, killed by her brother.


SERIFOS (Island) KYKLADES

The Quest of Medusa's Head

From the book:
Old Greek Stories by James Baldwin
Bringing Yesterday's Classics to Today's Children


SIKINOS (Island) KYKLADES

The myth of Thoas

When women of Lemnos killed the men of the island, king Thoas escaped with the help of his daughter Hypsipyle, who put him in a large jar and threw him to the sea. Thoas reached the island of Sicinos (then, Oenoe), where he had a son, Sicinus, by a nymph, after whom the island was named.


TINOS (Island) KYKLADES

Agamemnon encounter a storm at Tenos

After sacrificing, Agamemnon put to sea and touched at Tenedos. But Thetis came and persuaded Neoptolemus to wait two days and to offer sacrifice; and he waited. But the others put to sea and encountered a storm at Tenos; for Athena entreated Zeus to send a tempest against the Greeks; and many ships foundered.

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Calais & Zetes

(Kalais) and Zetes (Zetes). The Boreadae, or sons of Boreas and Orithyia. They were both winged heroes, and took part in the Argonautic expedition. Coming in the course of the enterprise to Salmydessus, they set free Phineus, the husband of their sister Cleopatra, from the Harpies, chasing them through the air on their wings. According to one story, they perished on this occasion; according to another, they were slain afterwards by Heracles on the island of Tenos, on their return from the funeral games of Pelias. This was in retribution for the counsel which they had given to the Argonauts on the coast of Mysia, to leave Heracles be hind. Their graves and monuments were shown in Tenos. One of the pillars was said to move when the north wind blew.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


While Orithyia was playing by the Ilissus river, Boreas carried her off and had intercourse with her; and she bore daughters, Cleopatra and Chione, and winged sons, Zetes and Calais. These sons sailed with Jason and met their end in chasing the Harpies; but according to Acusilaus, they were killed by Hercules in Tenos.
Commentary: This is the version adopted by Ap. Rhod., Argon. i.1298-1308, who tells us that when Zetes and Calais were returning from the funeral games of Pelias, Herakles killed them in Tenos because they had persuaded the Argonauts to leave him behind in Mysia; over their grave he heaped a barrow, and on the barrow he set up two pillars, one of which shook at every breath of the North Wind, the father of the two dead men. The slaughter of Zetes and Calais by Herakles is mentioned by Hyginus.

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Colonizations by the inhabitants

Tlepolemus settled in the Iberian islands

The people of Tlepolemus touched at Crete; then they were driven out of their course by winds and settled in the Iberian islands.


Constellations

NAXOS (Island) KYKLADES

Amphitrite


Constellation Dolphin

Eratosthenes and others give the following reason for the dolphin’s being among the stars. Amphitrite, when Neptunus [Poseidon] desired to wed her and she preferred to keep her virginity, fled to Atlas. Neptunus sent many to seek her out, among them a certain Delphinus, who, in his wandering s among the islands, came at last to the maiden, persuaded her to marry Neptunus, and himself took charge of the wedding. In return for this service, Neptunus put the form of a dolphin among the constellations. Hyginus Astronomica 2.17


Corona Borealis

This constellation is generally associated with Ariadne, the daughter of King Minos of Crete.


Descent

Telchines

Telchines who lived in Rhodes, the first makers of images of gods


   Telchines. A family or a tribe said to have been descended from Thalassa or Poseidon, whence Eustathius gives them fins instead of feet. They are represented in three different aspects: (1) As cultivators of the soil and ministers of the gods, in which capacity they came from Crete to Cyprus, and from thence to Rhodes, where they founded Camirus, Ialysus, and Lindus. Rhodes, which was named after them Telchinis, was abandoned by them because they foresaw that the island would be inundated. Poseidon was intrusted to them by Rhea, and they brought him up in conjunction with Caphira, a daughter of Oceanus. Rhea, Apollo, and Zeus, however, are also described as hostile to the Telchines. Apollo is said to have assumed the shape of a wolf, and to have thus destroyed the Telchines, and Zeus to have overwhelmed them by an inundation. (2) As sorcerers and envious daemons, their very eyes and aspect are said to have been destructive. They had it in their power to bring on hail, rain, and snow, and to assume any form they pleased; they, further, mixed Stygian water with sulphur, in order thereby to destroy animals and plants. (3) As artists they are said to have invented useful arts and institutions, and to have made images of the gods. They worked in brass and iron, and made the sickle of Cronos and the trident of Poseidon. They seem in general to suggest the gnomes of the Northern mythology and the genii of Oriental folklore. They may be compared also with the Idaei Dactyli.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks



The Telchines, fist making images to Goods

Some vague tradition of the influences just mentioned may be traced in the myths of such creatures as the Cyclopes, Idaean Dactyli, and Telchines--monsters or daemons of superhuman strength and skill. The Cyclopes are usually said to come from Lycia; they are usually represented as the builders of colossal walls. such as those of Mycenae and Tiryns; but works of sculpture are attributed to them--a head of Medusa at Argos and the Lions over the gate at Mycenae (which really belong to a Phrygian series). The Idaean Dactyli, or Fingers from Mount Ida, are attributed sometimes to Ida in Phrygia, sometimes to Ida in Crete; besides possessing skill in magic, they are said to have invented the working of iron. The Telchines, often in later times confused with the Dactyli even in names, seem to belong to Rhodes (Ov. Met. vii. 365), but are also connected with Crete and Cyprus. They, too, work in iron and bronze, and also practise magic. To these mythical workmen are attributed such objects as the Trident of Poseidon, the thunderbolts of Zeus, the Sickle of Cronus. It is obviously absurd to look for historical races or persons in such stories; but the countries to which they are assigned may indicate the belief of the Greeks as to the quarters whence were derived the technical appliances of art in the earliest times.

This extract is from: A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities (1890) (eds. William Smith, LLD, William Wayte, G. E. Marindin). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


The origin of painting, by Telchines

The origin of painting as an art in Greece is connected with definite historical personages; but that of sculpture is lost in the mists of legend. Its authentic history does not begin until about the year B.C. 600. It was regarded as an art imparted to men by the gods; for such is the thought expressed in the assertion that the earliest statues fell from heaven. Some early application of taste and skill to plastic art may be indicated in the mythical stories respecting the Idaei Dactyli and the Telchines of Rhodes (Ovid, Met.vii. 365), who were reported to have worked in iron and bronze.

This extract is cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Heliadae

After the Telchines, the Heliadae, according to the mythical story, took possession of the island; and to one of these, Cercaphus, and to his wife Cydippe, were born children who founded the cities that are named after them,Lindus, Ialysus, and Cameirus white with chalk. (Strabo 14,2,8)


Heliades and Heliadae (Heliadai).
(1) The daughters of Helios (the Sun) and Clymene. They were three in number--Lampetie, Phaethusa, and Phoebe; or seven, according to Hyginus-- Merope, Helie, Aegle, Lampetie, Phoebe, Aethria, and Dioxippe. They were so afflicted at the death of their brother Phaethon that they were changed by the gods into poplars, and their tears into amber, on the banks of the river Po.
(2) Children of Helios and the nymph Rhodus. They were seven in number, and were fabled to have been the first inhabitants of the island of Rhodes.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Actis

Actis (among the Heliades) sailed off to Egypt and founded there the city of Heliopolis.


Candalus

Candalus (among the Heliades) settled in Cos


Cercaphus

Cercaphus (among the Heliades) succeeded to the throne of Rhodes after his brother Ochimus. His sons divided the kingdom


Macar

Macar (among the Heliades) king of Lesbos. He is also called son of Crinacus, son of Zeus.


Ochimus

Ochimus (the oldest among the Heliades) king of Rhodes


Tenages

Tenages, being the most gifted among the Heliades, his brothers, out of envy, murdered him. When their treacherous act became known, all who had taken part in the murder fled and settled in different places.


Epic poems

ANAFI (Island) KYKLADES

Argonauts in Anaphe

Sailing by night they (Argonauts) encountered a violent storm, and Apollo, taking his stand on the Melantian ridges, flashed lightning down, shooting a shaft into the sea. Then they perceived an island close at hand, and anchoring there they named it Anaphe, because it had loomed up unexpectedly. So they founded an altar of Radiant Apollo, and having offered sacrifice they betook them to feasting; and twelve handmaids, whom Arete had given to Medea, jested merrily with the chiefs; whence it is still customary for the women to jest at the sacrifice

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Feb 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Eponymous founders or settlers

ANDROS (Ancient city) ANDROS

Andreus & Euippe

Son of river Peneus, marries Euippe, daughter of Leucon, founder of Andros.


Andreus, a son of the river-god Peneius in Arcadia, from whom the district about Orchomenos in Boeotia was called Andreis (Paus. ix. 34.5). In another passage (x. 13.3) Pausanias speaks of Andreus (it is, however, uncertain whether he means the same man as the former) as the person who first colonized Andros. According to Diodorus (v. 79) Andreus was one of the generals of Rhadamanthys, from whom he received the island afterwards called Andros as a present. Stephanus of Byzantium, Conon (41), and Ovid (Met. xiv. 639), call this first colonizer of Andros, Andrus and not Andreus.


KAMIROS (Ancient city) RODOS

Kameiros

Three grandsons of Helios and the nymph Rhodos, daughter of Aphrodite, were the eponymous heroes of the three ancient cities, Ialysos and Kameiros on the W coast and Lindos on the E.


Cameirus (Kameiros), a son of Cercaphus and Cydippe, and a grandson of Helios. The town of Cameiros, in Rhodes, is said to have derived its name from him. (Diod. v. 57; Pind. Ol. vii. 135, with the Schol.; Eustath. ad Hom.)


First inhabitants

KEA (Island) KYKLADES

Corycian Nymphs

An isle, by name Ceos, formerly ennobled by the Corycian nymphs, is surrounded by the Aegean sea.


Founders

KAMIROS (Ancient city) RODOS

Gods & demigods

ATAVYROS (Mountain) RODOS

Zeus Atabyrius

Atabyrius (Ataburios), a surname of Zeus derived from mount Atabyris or Atabyrion in the island of Rhodes, where the Cretan Althaemenes was said to have built a temple to him (Apollod. iii. 2.1; Appian, Mithrid. 26). Upon this mountain there were, it is said, brazen bulls which roared when anything extraordinary was going to happen. (Schol. ad Pind. Ol. vii. 159)


DELOS (Island) KYKLADES

Orion

And Artemis slew Orion in Delos.They say that he was of gigantic stature and born of the earth; but Pherecydes says that he was a son of Poseidon and Euryale. Poseidon bestowed on him the power of striding across the sea. He first married Side, whom Hera cast into Hades because she rivalled herself in beauty. Afterwards he went to Chios and wooed Merope, daughter of Oenopion. But Oenopion made him drunk, put out his eyes as he slept, and cast him on the beach. But he went to the smithy of Hephaestus, and snatching up a lad set him on his shoulders and bade him lead him to the sunrise. Being come thither he was healed by the sun's rays, and having recovered his sight he hastened with all speed against Oenopion.
But for him Poseidon had made ready a house under the earth constructed by Hephaestus. And Dawn fell in love with Orion and carried him off and brought him to Delos; for Aphrodite caused Dawn to be perpetually in love, because she had bedded with Ares.
But Orion was killed, as some say, for challenging Artemis to a match at quoits, but some say he was shot by Artemis for offering violence to Opis, one of the maidens who had come from the Hyperboreans.

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Porphyrion

One of the Giants. He tried to throw the island of Delos upon the gods, and was destroyed by Zeus at Heracles


Brizo

A goddess localized in Delos, to whom women, in particular, paid worship as being the protectress of mariners. They set before her eatables of various kinds (fish being excluded) in little boats. She also presided over an oracle.


Brizo, a prophetic goddess of the island of Delos, who sent dreams and revealed their meaning to man. Her name is connected with brizein, to fall asleep. The women of Delos offered sacrifices to her in vessels of the shape of boats, and the sacrifices consisted of various things; but fishes were never offered to her. Prayers were addressed to her that she might grant everything that was good, but especially, that she might protect ships. (Athen. viii.; Eustath. ad Hom.; Hesych. s. v. Brizomantis.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Glaucus

(Glaukos). A sea deity . . Some said that he dwelt with the Nereides at Delos, where he gave responses to all who sought them.


Asia

  The Oceanid wife of Prometheus. They had the son Deucalion, who with his wife Pyrrha was the only one to survive the great flood Zeus had sent to destroy mankind.
  Asia was together with her husband the creator of the human clay, which was first destroyed then recovered. She also named the continent of Asia.

This text is cited Sept 2003 from the In2Greece URL below.


Delius

Delius and Delia, (Delios and Delia or Delias), surnames of Apollo and Artemis respectively, which are derived from the island of Delos the birthplace of those two divinities. (Virg. Aen. vi. 12, Eclog. vii. 29; Val. Flacc. i. 446; Orph. Hymn. 33. 8.) They are likewise applied, especially in the plural, to other divinities that were worshipped in Delos, viz. Demeter, Aphrodite, and the nymphs. (Aristoph. Thesm. 333; Callim. Hymn. in Dian. 169, Hymn. in Del. 323; Hom. Hymn. in Apoll. Del. 157.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Loxo

Loxo, a daughter of Boreas, one of the Hyperborean maidens, who brought the worship of Artemis to Delos, whence it is also used as a surname of Artemis herself. (Callim. Hymn. in Del. 292; Nonnus, Dionys. v. p. 168)


IXIA (Beach) RODOS

Apollo Ixius

Ixius, a surname of Apollo, derived from a district of the island of Rhodes which was called Ixiae or Ixia. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Ixiai ; comp. Strab. xiv.)


Polybotes

(Polubotes), one of the giants who fought against the gods. He was pursued by Poseidon across the sea as far as the island of Cos. There Poseidon tore away a part of the island, which was afterwards called Nisyrion, and throwing it upon the giant buried him under it.



Gods & heroes related to the location

ATAVYROS (Mountain) RODOS

Althemenes

Althemenes or Althaemenes (Althaimenes), a son of Catreus, king of Crete. In consequence of an oracle, that Catreus would lose his life by one of his children, Althemenes quitted Crete together with his sister Anemosyne, in order to avoid becoming the insurunient of his father's death. He landed in Rhodes at a place which he called Cretenia, and in remembrance of the god of his own native island, he erected on mount Atabyrus an altar to Zeus Atabyrius. His sister was seduced in Rhodes by Hermes, but Althemenes, disbelieving her account, killed her by kicking her with his foot. When Catreus had become advanced in years, he had an invincible desire to see his only son once more, and to place his crown in his hands. He accordingly sailed to Rhodes. On his landing there, he and his companions were attacked by shepherds, who mistook them for pirates. During the ensuing struggle, Althemenes came to the protection of his subjects, and shot his own father dead. When he became aware of what he had done, he prayed to the gods, and was swallowed up by the earth. This is the account of Apollodorus (iii. 2.1, &c.), with which Diodorus (v. 59) agrees in the main points, except that he represents Althemenes as wandering about after the murder, and at last dying with grief. He adds, that the Rhodians subsequently worshipped him as a hero.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


DELOS (Island) KYKLADES

Theseus

On his voyage from Crete, Theseus put in at Delos, and having sacrificed to the god and dedicated in his temple the image of Aphrodite which he had received from Ariadne, he danced with his youths a dance which they say is still performed by the Delians, being an imitation of the circling passages in the Labyrinth, and consisting of certain rhythmic involutions and evolutions. This kind of dance, as Dicaearchus tells us, is called by the Delians The Crane, and Theseus danced it round the altar called Keraton, which is constructed of horns ("kerata") taken entirely from the left side of the head. They say that he also instituted athletic contests in Delos, and that the custom was then begun by him of giving a palm to the victors.

This extract is from: Plutarch's Lives (ed. Bernadotte Perrin, 1914). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Odysseus

I can only compare you to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growing near the altar of Apollo - for I was there, too, with many people after me, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all my troubles. (Homer, Odyss. 6.149)


KOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Hercules

When Hercules was sailing from Troy, Hera sent grievous storms, which so vexed Zeus that he hung her from Olympus. Hercules sailed to Cos, and the Coans, thinking he was leading a piratical squadron, endeavored to prevent his approach by a shower of stones. But he forced his way in and took the city by night, and slew the king, Eurypylus, son of Poseidon by Astypalaea. And Hercules was wounded in the battle by Chalcedon; but Zeus snatched him away, so that he took no harm. And having laid waste Cos, he came through Athena's agency to Phlegra, and sided with the gods in their victorious war on the giants.


Peleus

Peleus, king of Thessaly, son of Aeacus, he survived his son and even grandson, and died in misery in the island of Cos


MYKONOS (Island) KYKLADES

Ajax

Son of Oileus, suitor of Helen, leader of the Locrians against Troy, buried by Thetis in Myconos.


And Athena threw a thunderbolt at the ship of Ajax; and when the ship went to pieces he made his way safe to a rock, and declared that he was saved in spite of the intention of Athena. But Poseidon smote the rock with his trident and split it, and Ajax fell into the sea and perished; and his body, being washed up, was buried by Thetis in Myconos.(Apollod. E.6.6)
 In his great picture of the underworld, which Polygnotus painted at Delphi, the artist depicted Ajax as a castaway, the brine forming a scurf on his skin (Paus. 10.31.1 ). According to the Scholiast on Hom. Il. xiii.66 Ajax was cast up on the shore of Delos, where Thetis found and buried him. But as it was unlawful to be buried or even to die in Delos (Thuc. 3.104 ), the statement of Apollodorus that Ajax was buried in Myconus, a small island to the east of Delos, is more probable. It is said that on hearing of his death the Locrians mourned for him and wore black for a year, and every year they laded a vessel with splendid offerings, hoisted a black sail on it, and, setting the ship on fire, let it drift out to sea, there to burn down to the water's edge as a sacrifice to the drowned hero. Sophocles wrote a tragedy, The Locrian Ajax, on the crime and punishment of the hero. (Commentary)

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


NAXOS (Island) KYKLADES

Aloads (Ephialtes & Otus)

Artemis killed the Aloads in Naxos


PAROS (Island) KYKLADES

Heracles

The ninth labour he enjoined on Hercules was to bring the belt of Hippolyte. She was queen of the Amazons, who dwelt about the river Thermodon, a people great in war; for they cultivated the manly virtues, and if ever they gave birth to children through intercourse with the other sex, they reared the females; and they pinched off the right breasts that they might not be trammelled by them in throwing the javelin, but they kept the left breasts, that they might suckle. Now Hippolyte had the belt of Ares in token of her superiority to all the rest. Hercules was sent to fetch this belt because Admete, daughter of Eurystheus, desired to get it. So taking with him a band of volunteer comrades in a single ship he set sail and put in to the island of Paros, which was inhabited by the sons of Minos, to wit, Eurymedon, Chryses, Nephalion, and Philolaus. But it chanced that two of those in the ship landed and were killed by the sons of Minos. Indignant at this, Hercules killed the sons of Minos on the spot and besieged the rest closely, till they sent envoys to request that in the room of the murdered men he would take two, whom he pleased. So he raised the siege, and taking on board the sons of Androgeus, son of Minos, to wit, Alcaeus and Sthenelus, he came to Mysia. .

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Alcaeus & Sthenelus

Sons of Androgeus, taken as hostage by Herakles from Paros. They accompanied Heracles from Paros on his expedition against the Amazons, and were appointed by Heracles rulers of Thasos.


Alcaeus. According to Diodorus (v. 79) a general of Rhadamanthys, who presented him with the island of Paros. Apollodorus (ii. 5.9) relates that he was a son of Androgeus (the son of Minos) and brother of Sthenelus, and that when Heracles, on his expedition to fetch the girdle of Ares, which was in the possession of the queen of the Amazons, arrived at Paros, some of his companions were slain by the sons of Minos, residing there. Heracles, in his anger, slew the descendants of Minos, except Alcaeus and Sthenelus, whom he took with him, and to whom he afterwards assigned the Uisland of Thasus as their habitation.


Rhadamanthys

According to Diod. 5.79.2, Rhadamanthys of Crete bestowed the island of Paros on his son Alcaeus. The tradition points to a Cretan colony in Paros.


PIIESSA (Ancient city) KEA

Nestor

Near Coressia, and also near Poeeessa, is a temple of Sminthian Apollo; and between the temple and the ruins of Poeeessa is the temple of Nedusian Athena, founded by Nestor when he was on his return from Troy.


Danaus

Danaus feared the sons of Egyptus, and by the advice of Athena he built a ship, being the first to do so, and having put his daughters on board he fled. And touching at Rhodes he set up the image of Lindian Athena.


Cadmus

Kadmos stopped at Rhodes on his way from Phoenicia to Thebes


Catreus

In the grip of old age Catreus yearned to transmit the kingdom to his son Althaemenes, and went for that purpose to Rhodes.


Orestes, Iphigenia and Pylades

When Orestes was come with Pylades to the land of the Taurians, he was detected, caught, and carried in bonds before Thoas the king, who sent them both to the priestess. But being recognized by his sister, who acted as priestess among the Taurians, he fled with her, carrying off the wooden image. It was conveyed to Athens and is now called the image of Tauropolus. But some say that Orestes was driven in a storm to the island of Rhodes, ... and in accordance with an oracle the image was dedicated in a fortification wall.


Helen

They say that when Menelaus was dead, and Orestes still a wanderer, Helen was driven out by Nicostratus and Megapenthes and came to Rhodes, where she had a friend in Polyxo,the wife of Tlepolemus.


Cadmus in Thera

On the island now called Thera, but then Calliste, there were descendants of Membliarus the son of Poeciles, a Phoenician; for Cadmus son of Agenor had put in at the place now called Thera during his search for Europa; and having put in, either because the land pleased him, or because for some other reason he desired to do so, he left on this island his own relation Membliarus together with other Phoenicians.

This extract is from: Herodotus. The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley, 1920), Cambridge. Harvard University Press. Cited Feb 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


SERIFOS (Island) KYKLADES

Magnes

Son of Aeolus, father of Dictys and Polydectes.


Heroes

KOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Chalcodon

Chalcodon, a Coan who wounded Heracles in a fight at night (Apollod. ii. 7.1). Theocritus (vii. 6) calls him Chalcon. There are four other mythical personages of this name. (Apollod. ii. 1.5, iii. 5.15; Paus. vi. 21.7, viii. 15.3; Hom. Il. ii. 741, iv. 463)


NAXOS (Island) KYKLADES

Thoas

Son of Dionysus and Ariadne, king of Lemnos


Oinopion

Oenopion, son of Dionysus by Ariadne


Ceramus

son of Dionysus and Ariadne


Staphylos

Staphylus, son of Dionysus, in the Argo
son of Dionysus by Ariadne


Anius

(Anios). Son of Apollo by Rhoeo or Creusa, whose father, Staphylus of Naxos, a son of Dionysus and Ariadne, committed her to the sea in a box. She was carried to Delos, and there gave birth to her son Anius. Apollo taught him divination, and made him his priest and king of Delos. His son Thasus, like Linus and Actaeon, was torn to pieces by dogs, after which no dogs were allowed in the island. His daughters by the nymph Dorippe, being descendants of Dionysus, had the gift of turning anything they pleased into wine, corn, or oil; but when Agamemnon, on his way to Troy, wished to take them from their father by force, Dionysus changed them into doves.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Elpias

A case of a town built in such a spot was Old Salpia in Apulia, founded by Diomede on his way back from Troy, or, according to some writers, by Elpias of Rhodes. (Vitruvius Pollio, 1.4.1)


SERIFOS (Island) KYKLADES

Heleius

Heleius, (Heleios), a son of Perseus and Andromeda, who joined Amphitryon in the war against the Teleboans, and received from him the islands of the Taphians. (Apollod. ii. 4.5, 7; Schol. ad Hom. Il. xix. 116; Strab. viii. p. 363, where he is called Elios.)


Heroines

PAROS (Island) KYKLADES

Cleoboea

Cleoboea, they say that she was the first to bring the orgies of Demeter to Thasos from Paros. (Paus. 10.28.3)


Electryone

Electryone (Elektruone), a daughter of Helios and Rhodos. (Diod. v. 56; Schol. ad Pind. Ol. vii. 24.) The name is also used as a patronymic from Electryon, and given to his daughter, Alcmene. (Hes. Scut. Herc. 16)


Historic figures

Astypalaea

Astypalaea (Astupalaia), a daughter of Phoenix and Perimede, the daughter of Oeneus. She was a sister of Europa, and became by Poseidon the mother of the Argonaut Ancaeus and of Eurypylus, king of the island of Cos. The island Astypalaea among the Cyclades derived its name from her. (Apollod. ii. 7.1; Paus. vii. 4.2; Apollod. Rhod. ii. 866; Steph. Byz. s. v.)


ASTYPALEA (Ancient city) KOS

Astypalea

Mother of Eurypylus by Poseidon.


DELOS (Island) KYKLADES

Asteria

Daughter of Titan and Fivi, sister of Litous. Tranformed into quail to avoid Zeus and falling into sea made the island.


Asteria, a daughter of the Titan Coeus and the Titanid Phoebe, sister of Leto, and mother of Hecate by Perses, son of the Titan Crius. She is said to have turned into a quail (ortux) and plunged into the sea to escape the advances of Zeus. After her the island of Delos was first called Asteria, and later Ortygia.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Asteria, a daughter of the Titan Coeus (according to Hygin. Fab. Pref. of Polus) and Phoebe. She was the sister of Leto, and, according to Hesiod (Theog. 409), the wife of Perses, by whom she became the mother of Hecate. Cicero (de Nat. Deor. iii. 16) makes her the mother of the fourth Heracles by Zeus. But according to the genuine and more general tradition, she was an inhabitant of Olympus, and beloved by Zeus. In order to escape from his embraces, she got metamorphosed into a quail (ortux), threw herself into the sea, and was here metamorphosed into the island Asteria (the island which had fallen from heaven like a star), or Ortygia, afterwards called Delos (Apollod. i. 2.2, 4.1; Athen. ix.; Hygin. Fab. 53; Callimach. Hymn. in Del. 37; Serv. ad Aen. iii. 73). There are several other mythical personages of this name: one a daughter of Alcyoneus; a second, one of the Danaids (Apollod. ii. 1.5); a third, a daughter of Atlas (Hygin. Fab. 250, where, perhaps, Asterope is to be read); and a fourth, a daughter of Hydis, who became by Bellerophontes the mother of Hydissus, the founder of Hydissus in Caria (Steph. Byz. s. v. Hgdissos).

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Folegandros

Minoas' son, who habit the island with Cretans.


KEA (Island) KYKLADES

Keos

Locrian hero from Naupactus


KOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Coeus & Phoebe

Coeus; a Titan, son of Sky and Earth. Phoebe; a Titanid, daughter of Sky and Earth wife of Coeus. Parents of Asteria and Latona.



MARPISSA (Village) PAROS

Marpissa

Daughter of god-river Evinos.


PAROS (Island) KYKLADES

Nymph Paria

Mother of Chryses, Eurymedon, Nephalion and Philolaus.


Cabarnus

Cabarnus (Kabarnos), a mythical personage of the island of Paros, who revealed to Demeter the fact of her daughter having been carried off, and from whom the island of Paros was said to have been called Cabarnis. (Steph. Byz. s. v. Paros.) From Hesychius (s. v. Kabarnoi) it would seem that, in Paros, Cabarnus was the name for any priest of Demeter.


Nymph Rhodos

Three grandsons of Helios and the nymph Rhodos, daughter of Aphrodite, were the eponymous heroes of the three ancient cities, Ialysos and Kameiros on the W coast and Lindos on the E.


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