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Listed 24 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for wider area of: "LOKRIDA Province FTHIOTIDA" .


Homeric world (24)

Greek heroes of the Trojan War

OPOUS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Patroclus

Son of Menoetius (Il. 18.326 etc.), loyal friend of Achilles, whom he followed at Troy. When he was young, he took refuge in the house of Peleus in Phthia because of the murder of the son of Amphidamus (Il. 11.765 etc. 23.87 etc.). He was slain by Hector (Il. 16.818 etc.) and funeral games took place in his honour (Il. 23).


   (Patroklos) and Patrocles (Patrokles). The penult is almost always long in the Iliad, Patroclus once only in vocative. Son of Menoetius and Sthenele, the bosom friend of Achilles. While still a boy Patroclus involuntarily slew Clysonymus, son of Amphidamas. In consequence of this accident he was taken by his father to Peleus at Phthia, where he was educated together with Achilles. He is said to have taken part in the expedition against Troy on account of his attachment to Achilles. He fought bravely against the Trojans until his friend withdrew from the scene of action, when Patroclus followed his example. But when the Greeks were hard pressed, he begged Achilles to allow him to put on his armour, and with his men to hasten to the assistance of the Greeks. Achilles granted the request, and Patroclus succeeded in driving back the Trojans and extinguishing the fire which was raging among the ships. He slew many enemies, and thrice made an assault upon the walls of Troy; but he was suddenly struck by Apollo, and became senseless. In this state Euphorbus ran him through with his lance from behind, and Hector gave him the last and fatal blow. Hector also took possession of his armour. A long struggle now ensued between the Greeks and Trojans for the body of Patroclus; but the former obtained possession of it, and brought it to Achilles, who was deeply grieved, and vowed to avenge the death of his friend. Thetis protected the body with ambrosia against decomposition until Achilles had leisure solemnly to burn it with funeral sacrifices. His ashes were collected in a golden urn which Dionysus had once given to Thetis, and were deposited under a mound, where the remains of Achilles were subsequently buried. Funeral games were celebrated in his honour. Achilles and Patroclus met again in the lower world; or, according to others, they continued after their death to live together in the island of Leuce.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Greek leaders in the Trojan War

NARYX (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Aias (Ajax) the Locrian

Aias was the son of Oileus and leader of the Locrians in the Trojan War. Physically, he was of small stature compared to Aias the Telamonian, but an excellent fighter (Il. 2.527).


He lost all his ships during his return home from Troy, while he was saved in a storm with the help of Poseidon. But his claim that this occurred without the willing of the gods caused the anger of Poseidon, who provoked a crack on the rock, where Aias was saved, resulting his drowning (Od. 4.499).


Aiax (Aias, Ajax). Son of Oileus, king of the Locrians, also called the lesser Aiax, sailed against Troy in forty ships. He is described as small of stature, but skilled in throwing the spear, and, next to Achilles, the most swiftfooted among the Greeks. On his return from Troy his vessel was wrecked; he himself safely reached a rock through the assistance of Poseidon; but, as he boasted that he would escape in defiance of the immortals, Poseidon split the rock with his trident, and Aiax was swallowed up by the sea. This is the account of Homer. Others tell us that the anger of Athene was excited against him because on the night of the capture of Troy he violated Cassandra in the temple of the goddess.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Ajax. The son of Oileus, king of the Locrians, who is also called the Lesser Ajax (Hom. Il. ii. 527). His mother's name was Eriopis. According to Strabo (ix.) his birthplace was Naryx in Locris, whence Ovid (Met. xiv. 468) calls him Narycius heros. According to the Iliad (ii. 527, &c.) he led his Locrians in forty ships (Hygin. Fab. 97, says twenty) against Troy. He is described as one of the great heroes among the Greeks, and acts frequently in conjunction with the Telamonian Ajax. He is small of stature and wears a linen cuirass (linothorex), but is brave and intrepid, especially skilled in throwing the spear, and, next to Achilles, the most swift-footed among all the Greeks (Il. xiv. 520, &c., xxiii. 789, &c.). His principal exploits during the siege of Troy are mentioned in the following passages: xiii. 700, &c., xiv. 520, &c., xvi. 350, xvii. 256, 732, &c. In the funeral games at the pyre of Patroclus he contended with Odysseus and Antilochus for the prize in the footrace; but Athena, who was hostile towards him and favoured Odysseus, made him stumble and fall, so that he gained only the second prize (xxiii. 754, &c.). On his return from Troy his vessel was wrecked on the Whirling Rocks (Gurai petrai), but he himself escaped upon a rock through the assistance of Poseidon, and would have been saved in spite of Athena, but he used presumptuous words, and said that he would escape the dangers of the sea in defiance of the immortals. Hereupon Poseidon split the rock with his trident, and Ajax was swallowed up by the sea (Od. iv. 499, &c.).
  In later traditions this Ajax is called a son of Oileus and the nymph Rhene, and is also mentioned among the suitors of Helen (Hygin. Fab. 81, 97; Apollod. iii. 10.8). According to a tradition in Philostratus (Her. iii. 1), Ajax had a tame dragon, five cubits in length, which followed him everywhere like a dog. After the taking of Troy, it is said, he rushed into the temple of Athena, where Cassandra had taken refuge, and was embracing the statue of the goddess as a suppliant. Ajax dragged her away with violence and led her to the other captives (Virg. Aen. ii. 403 ; Eurip. Troad. 70, &c.; Dict. Cret. v. 12; Hygin. Fab. 116). According to some statements he even violated Cassandra in the temple of the goddess (Tryphiod. 635; Q. Smyrn. xiii. 422 ; Lycophr. 360, with the Schol.); Odysseus at least accused him of this crime, and Ajax was to be stoned to death, but saved himself by establishing his innocence by an oath (Paus. x. 26.1, 31.1). The whole charge, is on the other hand, said to have been an invention of Agamemnon, who wanted to have Cassandra for himself. But whether true or not, Athena had sufficient reason for being indignant, as Ajax had dragged a suppliant from her temple. When on his voyage homeward he came to the Capharean rocks on the coast of Euboea, his ship was wrecked in a storm, he himself was killed by Athena with a flash of lightning, and his body was washed upon the rocks, which henceforth were called the rocks of Ajax (Hygin. Fab. 116; comp. Virg. Aen. i. 40, &c., xi. 260). For a different account of his death see Philostr. Her. viii. 3, and Schol. ad Lycophr. l. c. After his death his spirit dwelled in the island of Leuce (Paus. iii. 19.11). The Opuntian Locrians worshipped Ajax as their national hero, and so great was their faith in him, that when they drew up their army in battle array, they always left one place open for him, believing that, although invisible to them, he was fighting for and among them. The story of Ajax was frequently made use of by ancient poets and artists, and the hero who appears on some Locrian coins with the helmet, shield, and sword, is probably Ajax the son of Oileus.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Greeks of the Homeric Catalogue of Ships

KYNOS (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Trojan War

Cynus participated in the war and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.531).


OPOUS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Trojan War

Opoeis (Opus) participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.531, 18.326).


SKARFIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Trojan War

Scarphe participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.532).


TARFI (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Trojan War

Scarphe participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.533).


THRONION (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Trojan War

Thronium participated in the Trojan War and it is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of the Ships. It was at the bank of Voagrios river (Il. 2.533).


YAMPOLIS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Trojan War

Hyampolis participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.521).


Heroes

OPOUS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Menoetius

He was the son of Actor, father of Patroclus and came from Opoeis (Il. 11.765, 16.14, 23.85).


Menoitios: Son of Actor and Aegina and father of Patroclus, who is hence called Menoetiades.


Menoetius: Perseus Encyclopedia


Heroines

Astyoche

Daughter of Actor, mother of Ascalaphus and Ialmenus by Ares. (Paus. 9.37.7)


Kings

NARYX (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Oileus & Eriopis

They were the parents of Aias the Locrian. Oileus was also the father of Medon by Rhene (Il. 2.527 & 727, 13.697, 15.336).


   Oileus. The son of Hodoedocus and Laonome, grandson of Cynus, and great-grandson of Opus, was a king of the Locrians, and married to Eriopis, by whom he became the father of Aiax, who is hence called Oilides, Oiliades, and Aiax Oilei. Oileus was also the father of Medon by Rhene. He is mentioned among the Argonauts.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Oileus & Eriopis: Perseus Encyclopedia


Other persons

Rhene

The mother of Medon by Oileus (Il. 2.728).


Place-names according to Homer

THRONION (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Boagrius river

It is to the W of Thronion and, nowadays, is called "flume of Platania". It empties into the Maliakos Gulf (Il. 2.533).


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