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Archaeological Site of Makre

Last Update: Nov 2005
Archaeological site MAKRI , ALEXANDROUPOLI , GREECE
Tel.: +30 25510 71219

Archaeological Site of Makre - Overview

  The first habitation of the site dates from the Neolithic period (5000 B.C.) and is attested in the area of the cave. The accumulated debris of the successive clay buildings of the prehistoric periods, gradually created a low mound (Toumba). In ca. 1000 B.C. a small settlement was established on the site by the Thracians and later, Greek colonists of the 7th century B.C. founded a small trading post of which the refuse pits are preserved, full of amphoras. In the Roman period, a strong retaining wall was constructed and during the Byzantine era, the site was used as a cemetery.
  The site was discovered during the First World War. George Bakalakis was the first archaeologist to visit the place and he identified it as the ancient city of Zone and cape Serreion. Excavations on the site were first carried out in 1988 by the 19th Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities and are still in progress. The Neolithic settlement which has come to light is one of the most important in the Balkans. The excavation results also prooved that the ancient settlement was simply a trading post and not the city of Zone, while cape Serreion can now be securely placed at the end of Ismaros.

  The most important monuments on the site are:
• Neolithic settlement.
  It consisted of post-hole structures of which the floors, pise walls, ovens, hearths etc. are preserved.
• Trading post of the Classical and Roman periods.
  Two pits, the fortification wall and houses are preserved.
• The "Cyclops cave".
  Small cave with two chambers.
• Rock-cut structures.
  Still visible today are stairways, niches, cisterns and an observation post.

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Archaeological site

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Visiting Information • Organized archeological site
Prehistoric settlement • Neolithic period, 6500-3200 BC

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