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Listed 3 sub titles with search on: Information about the place for destination: "PYRASSOS Ancient city VOLOS".


Information about the place (3)

The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

Pyrasos

  The harbor town of Thessalian Thebes on a small hill overlooking the Bay of Volo. A small fish pond between the hill and the sea represents the site of the ancient harbor, known in later times as Demetrion from the early and important Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore. The site of the sanctuary is disputed, but numerous gravestones attest the international character of the harbor. Stahlin found an early circuit wall of field stones and mudbrick overlaid by Byzantine remains near the top of the hill, and other similar walls at the foot on the NE and E.

M. H. Mc Allister, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Perseus Project index

Pyrasus

Total results on 2/7/2001: 9


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Pyrasus

  Purasos, Purrhasos, Eth. Purasaios. A town of Phthiotis in Thessaly, mentioned by Homer along with Phylace and Iton, and described by him as Purrhason anthemoenta, Demetros temenos. (Il. ii. 695.) Pyrasus was situated on the Pagasaean gulf, at the distance of 20 stadia from Thebes, and possessed a good harbour (eulimenos, Strab. ix. p. 435). It had disappeared in the time of Strabo. Its name was superseded by that of Demetrium, derived from the temple of Demeter, spoken of by Homer, and which Strabo describes as distant two stadia from Pyrasus. Demetrium is mentioned as a town of Phthiotis by Scylax (p. 24, Hudson), Livy (xxviii. 6), Stephanus B. (s. v. Demetrion), and Mela (ii. 3). Leake places Pyrasus at Kokkina, where there are vestiges of an ancient town, consisting of wrought quadrangular blocks, together with many smaller fragments, and an oblong height with a flat summit, partly if not wholly artificial. He also states that at Kokkina there is a circular basin full of water near the shore, which was once probably a small harbour, since there are traces of a mole not far from it. The exact site of the temple was probably at a spot, 5 minutes short of Kokkina, where exist many stones and some hewn blocks. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 366.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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