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Acheron river


In South-Eastern Thesprotia, below the mountains of Souli, flows the river Acheron, the river of the dead and the wailing. Thesprotia, land of Aidoneos-Hades, with the famous necromance at the river-banks, is filled with myths and legends through the centuries.
Starting off at Glyki, we can walk in the river of the legends, in the gorge and the springs of Acheron. The motorway which begins inside Glyki, on the left of the Igoumenitsa-Paramythia-Preveza road, leads alongside the river, into a forest of plane-trees. We leave the car and we proceed on foot, along the path up to the sources of the river. We continue through the cool river, entering the main part of the gorge, walking against the stream. At the junction of the Acheron river with the "Dala" stream, which comes down from Souli, there is a stone bridge and on our right there is the famous "Skala tis Tzavelenas" (stairway of Tzavelena), the old path of the Souliotes. Most people stop at the bridge, others continue to the sources of the Dala stream at the old water-mill, but the few daring ones, take the road which leads to Hades’ gates towards Sertziana of Ioannina.
The vertical rocks join together, leaving just enough space for the river to go through. In the past they used to join at the top, giving the impression of a giant gate, but the top collapsed. Those who come this far, will have fully tasted the quintessence of the legends!

This text is cited June 2003 from the Thesprotia Prefecture Tourism Promotional Committee URL below, which contains images.


Perseus Project index

Acheron

Total results on 29/3/2001: 111 for Acheron, 31 for Acheron;river.


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Acheron

A river in Thesprotia, in Epirus, which flows through the lake Acherusia into the Ionian Sea.


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Acheron

  Acheron (Acheron), the name of several rivers, all of which were, at least at one time, believed to be connected with the lower world. The Acheron as a river of the lower world, is described in the Diet. of Biogr. and Myth.
  A river of Epeirus in Thesprotia, which passed through the lake Acherusia (Acherousia limne), and after receiving the river Cocytus (Kokutos), flowed into the Ionian sea, S. of the promontory Cheimerium. Pliny (iv. 1) erroneously states that the river flowed into the Ambraciot gulf. The bay of the sea into which it flowed was usually called Glycys Limen (Glukus limen) or Sweet-Harbour, because the water was fresh on account of the quantity poured into it from the lake and river. Scylax and Ptolemy call the harbour Elaea (Elaia), and the surrounding district bore according to Thucydides the name of Elaeatis (Elaiatis). The Acheron is the modern Gurla or river of Suli, the Cocytus is the Vuvo, and the great marsh or lake below Kastri the Acherusia. The water of the Vuvo is reported to be bad, which agrees with the account of Pausanias (i. 17. § 5) in relation to the water of the Cocytus (ndor aterpestaton). The Glycys Limen is called Port Fanari, and its water is still fresh; and in the lower part of the plain the river is commonly called the river of Fandri. The upper part of the plain is called Glyky; and thus the ancient name of the harbour has been transferred from the coast into the interior. On the Acheron Aidoneus, the king of the lower world, is said to have reigned, and to have detained here Theseus as a prisoner; and on its banks was an oracle called nekuomanteion (Herod. v. 92. § 7), which was consulted by evoking the spirits of the dead. (Thuc. i. 46; Liv. viii. 24; Strab. p. 324; Steph. B. s. v.; Paus. i. 17.> § 5; Dion Cass. l. 12; Scylax, p. 11; Ptolem. iii. 14. § 5; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. i. p. 232, seq. iv. p. 53.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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