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Listed 100 (total found 262) sub titles with search on: Homeric world for destination: "TROY Ancient city TURKEY".


Homeric world (262)

Eponymous founders or settlers

Ilus

He was the son of Tros, father of Laomedon, brother of Ganymedes and Assaracus, founder of the city of Ilion (Il. 21.232). His grave was between the Scaean gates and the camp of the Achaeans (Il. 10.415, 11.166 & 371).


Illus, (Ilos). The son of Tros, and great-grandson of Dardanus, brother of Assaracus and Ganymede, and father of Laomedon. He once went from his native town of Dardania upon Mount Ida to Phrygia, where he was victorious in an athletic contest held by the king of the country. Besides fifty youths and fifty maidens, the prize of the contest, the king gave him, at the command of an oracle, a spotted cow, and directed him to found a city on the spot where she lay. He accordingly founded on the hill of the Phrygian Ate, the town which after him was called Ilios, and also Troy (Troia) after his father. When he demanded a sign of Zeus, on the following morning he found the statue known as the Palladium before his tent.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Ilus, a son of Tros, and grandson of Erichthonius. His mother was Calirrhoe, and being a greatgrandson of Dardanus, he is called Dardanides (Hom. Il. xi. 372). He was a brother of Assaracus, Ganymedes, and Cleopatra, and married to Eurydice, the daughter of Adrastus, by whom he became the father of Laomedon, so that he was the grandfather of Priam (Apollod. iii. 1.1-3; Hom. Il. xx. 232, &c.). He was believed to be the founder of Troy (Ilion), concerning which the following story is related. Once Ilus went to Phrygia, and there won the prize as a wrestler in the games which the king of Phrygia celebrated. The prize consisted of 50 youths and 50 maidens; and the king, in pursuance of an oracle, at the same time gave him a cow of different colours, requesting Ilas to build a town on the spot where that cow should lie down. Ilus accordingly followed the cow until she laid down at the foot of the Phrygian hill Ate (Steph. Byz. s. v. Ilion ; Hesych. s. v. Atiolophos; Tzetz. ad Lycoph, 29, who gives the story somewhat differently). There Ilus accordingly built Ilion; and after having prayed to Zeus to send him a sign, he found on the next morning the palladium, a statue of three cubits in height, with its feet close together, holding a spear in its right hand, and a distaff in the left. Ilus then built a temple for the statue (Apollod. iii. 12.3). Once, when this temple was consumed by fire, Ilus rescued the statue, but became blind, as no one was permitted to see it; but he afterwards propitiated the goddess, and recovered his sight (Plut. Paral. Gr. et Rom. 17). Hus is said to have expelled Tantalus or his son Pelops from Paphlagonia, for having carried off his brother Ganymedes (Paus. ii. 22.4; Diod. iv. 74). His tomb was shown in the neighbourhood of Troy.
(Hom. Il. x. 415, xi. 166, 372, xxiv. 349; Theocrit. xvi. 75; Eustath. ad Hom.)


Trojan Allies

Trojan War

Troy, also known as Ilium, was the capital of Troas and its king was Priam (Il. 2.141, 1.129, Od. 11.510). The war, which takes place in front of the walls of Troy, began because of the abduction of Helen, wife of Menelaus, king of Sparta, by Paris, son of Priam.


Trojan leaders in the War

Hector & Andromache

Son of the king of Troy, Priam, and Hecuba, husband of Andromache and father of Astyanax, the foremost among the Trojans, who also differed from the others in prudence (Il. 2.816, 6.369, 7.233, 16.712). He was slain by Achilles (Il. 22.78).
Andromache was the daughter of Eetion, king of Thebes in Cilicia, whom Achilles killed as well as her seven brothers (Il. 6.371, 6.415).


The horses of Hector mentioned in the Iliad are Xanthus, Podargus, Aethon and Lampus (Il. 8.185).


Hector, (Hektor), the chief hero of the Trojans in their war with the Greeks, was the eldest son of Priam by Hecabe, the husband of Andromache, and father of Scamandrius. (Hom. Il. ii. 817; Apollod. iii. 12.5; Theocrit. xv. 139.) Some traditions describe him as a son of Apollo (Tzetz. ad Lycoplh. 265; Schol. Venet. ad II. iii. 314.), and speak of him as the father of two sons by Andromache, viz. Scamandrius and Laodamas, or Amphineus. (Dict. Cret. iii. 20.) According to the most common account, Protesilaus, who was the first of the Greeks that jumped upon the Trojan coast, was slain by Hector. (Lucian, Dial. Mort. 23, 1; Hygin. Fab. 113.) This, however, is not mentioned in the Iliad; and his first act described in that poem is his censure of Alexander (Paris) who, after having gone out to fight Menelaus in single combat, took to flight. (Il. iii. 39, &c.) He himself then challenged Menelaus. During the battle he was accompanied by Ares, with whom he rushed forward to protect his friend Sarpedon, and slew many Greeks (v. 590, &c.) When Diomedes had wounded Ares, and was pressing the Trojans very hard, Hector hastened to the city to request Hecabe to pray to Athena for assistance. (vi. 110.) Hereupon he went to Paris and had a conversation with him and Helena, reproaching the former for his cowardice. He then went to his own house to seek Andromache, but she was absent; and he afterwards found her with her child Scamandrius at the Scaean gate. The scene which there took place is one of the most delicate and beautiful scenes in the Iliad (vi. 406, &c.). After having taken leave of his wife and child, he returned to battle, and challenged the bravest of the Greeks to single combat. No one ventured to come forward except Menelaus, who, however, was dissuaded from it by his friends. The lot then fell upon the Telamonian Ajax. Hector was wounded, and at nightfall the battle ceased, and the two heroes honoured each other with presents. After this he again distinguished himself by various feats (viii. 307, &c., x. 299, &c.,xi. 163, &c.) In the fierce battle in the camp of the Greeks, he was struck with a stone by Ajax, and carried away from the field of battle (xiv. 402). Apollo cured his wound, and then led him back to battle. He there repelled Ajax, and fire was set to the ships of the Greeks (xv. 253, &c. xvi. 114, &c.). In the encounter with Patroclus, he at first gave way, but, encouraged by Apollo, he returned, fought with Patroclus, slew him, took off his armour, and put it on himself (xvi. 654. &c., xvii. 192). Thereupon a vehement contest took place about the body of Patroclus, which Hector refused to give up. Polydamas advised him to withdraw to the city before the arrival of Achilles, but the Trojan hero refused (xviii. 160, &c.). Apollo forbade Hector to enter upon a contest with Achilles; but when the two heroes met, they were protected by Apollo and Athena (xx. 375, &c.). The Trojans fled, but Hector, although called back by his parents in the most imploring terms, remained and awaited Achilles. When, however, the latter made his appearance, Hector took to flight, and was chased thrice around the city (xxii. 90, &c.). His fall was now determined on by Zeus and Athena; and assuming the appearance of Deiphobus, Athena urged him to make his stand against the pursuer. Hector was conquered, and fell pierced by the spear of Achilles (xxii. 182-330; comp Dict. Cret. iii. 15). Achilles tied his body to his own chariot, and thus dragged him into the camp of the Greeks; but later traditions relate that he first dragged the body thrice around the walls of Ilium. (Virg. Aen. i. 483.) In the camp the body was thrown into the dust, that it might be devoured by the dogs. But Aphrodite embalmed it with ambrosia, and Apollo protected it by a cloud. At the command of Zeus, however, Achilles surrendered the body to the prayers of Priam (xxiv. 15, &c.; comp. Eustath. ad Hom. p. 1273; Virg. Aen. i. 484). When the body arrived at Ilium, it was placed on a bier ; and while Andromache held the head of her beloved Hector on her knees, the lamentations began, whereupon the body was burned, and solemnly buried (xxiv. 718, &c.). Funeral games were celebrated on his tomb (Virg. Aen. v. 371; Philostr. Her. 10), and on the throne of Apollo at Amyclae, the Trojans were seen offering sacrifices to him. (Paus. iii. 18.9.) In pursuance of an oracle, the remains of Hector were said to have been conveyed to the Boeotian Thebes, where his tomb was shown in later times. (Paus. ix. 18.4; Tzetz. ad Lycoph. 1194.) Hector is one of the noblest conceptions of the poet of the Iliad. He is the great bulwark of Troy, and even Achilles trembles when he approaches him. He has a presentiment of the fall of his country, but he perseveres in his heroic resistance, preferring death to slavery and disgrace. But besides these virtues of a warrior, he is distinguished also, and perhaps more so than Achilles, by those of a man: his heart is open to the gentle feelings of a son, a husband, and a father. He was represented in the Lesche at Delphi by Polygnotus (Paus. x. 31.2), and on the chest of Cypselus (v. 19.1), and he is frequently seen in vase paintings.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


   Hector, (Hektor). The son of Priam and Hecuba and the most valiant of all the Trojan chiefs that fought against the Greeks. He married Andromache, daughter of Eetion, by whom he became the father of Astyanax. Hector was appointed commander of all the Trojan forces, and for a long period proved the bulwark of his native city. He was not only the bravest and most powerful, but also the most amiable, of his countrymen, and particularly distinguished himself in his conflicts with Aiax, Diomedes, and many other of the most formidable leaders. The fates had decreed that Troy should never be destroyed as long as Hector lived. The Greeks, therefore, after the death of Patroclus, who had fallen by Hector's hand, made a powerful effort under the command of Achilles; and, by the intervention of Athene, who assumed the form of Deiphobus, and urged Hector to encounter the Grecian chief, contrary to the remonstrances of Priam and Hecuba, their effort was crowned with success. Hector fell, and his death accomplished the overthrow of his father's kingdom. The dead body of the Trojan warrior was attached to the chariot of Achilles, and insultingly dragged away to the Grecian fleet; and thrice every day, for the space of twelve days, was it also dragged by the victor around the tomb of Patroclus. During all this time the corpse of Hector was shielded from dogs and birds, and preserved from corruption, by the united care of Aphrodite and Apollo. The body was at last ransomed by Priam, who went in person for this purpose to the tent of Achilles. Splendid obsequies were rendered to the deceased, and with these the action of the Iliad terminates. Vergil makes Achilles to have dragged the corpse of Hector thrice round the walls of Troy. Homer, however, is silent on this point. According to the latter, Hector fled thrice round the city-walls before engaging with Achilles; and, after he was slain, his body was immediately attached to the car of the victor, and dragged away as stated above. The incident, therefore, alluded to by Vergil must have been borrowed from one of the Cyclic poets, or perhaps some tragic writer. insultingly dragged away to the Grecian fleet; and thrice every day, for the space of twelve days, was it also dragged by the victor around the tomb of Patroclus. During all this time the corpse of Hector was shielded from dogs and birds, and preserved from corruption, by the united care of Aphrodite and Apollo. The body was at last ransomed by Priam, who went in person for this purpose to the tent of Achilles. Splendid obsequies were rendered to the deceased, and with these the action of the Iliad terminates. Vergil makes Achilles to have dragged the corpse of Hector thrice round the walls of Troy. Homer, however, is silent on this point. According to the latter, Hector fled thrice round the city-walls before engaging with Achilles; and, after he was slain, his body was immediately attached to the car of the victor, and dragged away as stated above. The incident, therefore, alluded to by Vergil must have been borrowed from one of the Cyclic poets, or perhaps some tragic writer.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


   Andromache. The daughter of Eetion, king of the Cilician Thebes, and wife of Hector, by whom she had a son, Scamandrius (Astyanax). On the taking of Troy, her son was hurled from the walls of the city, and she herself fell to the share of Neoptolemus (Pyrrhus), the son of Achilles, who took her to Epirus. She afterwards married Helenus, a brother of Hector, who ruled over Chaonia.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks



Trojan heroes of the Trojan War and their allies

Agenor

Son of Antenor by Theano, daughter of Cisseus, eminent among the Trojans for his braveness (Il. 4.467, 11.59).


Agenor. Son of Antenor by Theano, a priestess of Athene, and one of the bravest heroes of Troy. In Homer he leads the Trojans in storming the Greek intrenchments, rescues Hector when thrown down by Aiax, and even enters the lists with Achilles, but is saved from imminent danger by Apollo. In the post-Homeric legend he dies by the hand of Neoptolemus.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Agenor. A son of the Trojan Antenor and Theano, the priestess of Athena. (Hom. Il. xi. 59, vi. 297.) He appears in the Iliad as one of the bravest among the Trojans, and is one of their leaders in the attack upon the fortifications of the Greeks. (iv. 467, xii. 93, xiv. 425.) He even ventures to fight with Achilles, who is wounded by him. (xxi. 570, &c.) Apollo rescued him in a cloud from the anger of Achilles, and then assumed himself the appearance of Agenor, by which means he drew Achilles away from the walls of Troy, and afforded to the fugitive Trojans a safe retreat to the city. (xxi. in fine.) According to Pausanias (x. 27. ยง 1) Agenor was slain by Neoptolemus, and was represented by Polygnotus in the great painting in the Lesche of Delphi.


Alcathous & Hippodameia

Son of Aesyetes, husband of Hippodameia, daughter of Anchises, and one of the most important heroes among the Trojans, who was slain by Idomeneus (Il. 12.93, 13.428).


Alcathous .A son of Aesyetes and husband of Hippodameia, the daughter of Anchises and sister of Aeneas, who was educated in his house. (Hom. Il. xiii. 466.) In the war of Troy he was one of the Trojan leaders, and was one of the handsosmest and bravest among them. (Il. xii. 93, xiii. 427.) He was slain by Idomeneus with the assistance of Poseidon, who struck Alcathous with blindness and paralyzed his limbs so that he could not flee. (Il. xiii. 433, &c.)
Another personage of this name is mentioned by Virgil, Aen. x. 747.


Antimachus

A Trojan, father of Hippolochus, of Peisander and of Hippomachus, who refused the giving of Helen back to Menelaus (Il. 11.123).


Antimachus (Antimachos), a Trojan, who, when Menelaus and Odysseus came to Troy to ask for the surrender of Helen, advised his countrymen to put the ambassadors to death (Hom. Il. xi. 122, &c., 138, &c.). It was Antimachus who principally insisted upon Helen not being restored to the Greeks (Il. xi. 125). He had three sons, and when two of them, Peisander and Hippolochus, fell into the hands of Menelaus, they were both put to death.
  There are three other mythical personages of this name. (Hygin. Fab. 170; Schol. ad Pind. Isthm. iv. 104; Ov. Met. xii. 460)


Antiphus

A son of Priam and Hecuba, who was slain by Agamemnon (Il. 4.490, 11.101).


Antiphus (Antiphos). A son of Priam and Hecuba. (Hom. Il. iv. 490; Apollod. iii. 12.5). While he was tending the flocks on mount Ida with his brother Isus, he was made prisoner by Achilles, but was restored to freedom after a ransom was given for him. He afterwards fell by the hands of Agamemnon (Hom. Il. ix. 101)


Abderus

A Trojan, who was slain by Antilochus, son of Nestor (Il. 6.32).


Agelaus

A Trojan, son of Phradmon, who was slain by Diomedes (Il. 8.257).


Astyalus

A Trojan, who was slain by Polypoetes (Il. 6.29).


Adamas

Son of Asius, who was slain by Meriones (Il. 12.140, 13.560).


Astynous

A Trojan, son of Prothiaon, (Il. 15.455).


Adrastus

A Trojan, who was slain by Menelaus (Il. 6.37 & 51).


Adrastus

A Trojan, who was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.694).


Aesepus

A Trojan, son of Boucolion, who was slain by Euryalus (Il. 6.21).


Acamas

A Trojan, son of Asius, who was slain by Meriones (Il. 12.140, 13.560).


Amopaon

A Trojan, son of Polyaemon, who was slain by Teucer (Il. 8.276).


Amphiclus

A Trojan, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 16.313).


Amphoterus

A Trojan, who was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.415).


Simoeisius

A Trojan, son of Anthemion, who was slain by Ajax (Il. 4.488).


Antiphates

A Trojan (Il. 12.191).


Antiphonus

A son of Priam (Il. 24.250).


Apisaon

A Trojan, son of Phausius (Il. 11.578).


Aretaon

A Trojan, who was slain by Teucer (Il. 6.31).


Aretus

He was a son of Priam, who was slain by Automedon (Il. 17.495).


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Autonous

A Trojan, who was slain by Patrolcus (Il. 16.694).


Bienor

A Trojan, who was slain by Agamemnon (Il. 11.92).


Gorgythion

He was the son of Priam and Castianeira from Aesyme. He was slain by Teucer (Il. 8.302).


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Daetor

A Trojan, who was slain by Teucer (Il. 8.275).


Damasus

A Trojan, who was slain by Polypoetes (Il. 12.183).


Dardanus

A Trojan, son of Bias, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 20.460).


Deucalion

A Trojan, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 20.478).


Deicoon

A Trojan, son of Pergasus, who was slain by Agamemnon (Il. 5.534).


Deiopites

He was a son of Priam, who was slain by Odysseus (Il. 11.420).



Deiphobus

He was a son of Priam by Hecuba and twin brother of Helenus (Il. 12.94, 13.156), who went to examine closely the Wooden Horse (Od. 4.276).


Deiphobus, (Deiphobos). A son of Priam and Hecabe, was next to Hector the bravest among the Trojans. When Paris, yet unrecognized, came to his brothers, and conquered them all in the contest for his favourite bull, Deiphobus drew his sword against him, and Paris fled to the altar of Zeus Herceceius. (Hygin. Fab. 91.) Deiphobus and his brothers, Helenus and Asius, led the third host of the Trojans against the camp of the Achaeans (Hom. Il. xii. 94), and when Asius had fallen, Deiphobus advanced against Idomeneus, but, instead of killing him, he slew Hypsenor. (xiii. 410.) When hereupon Idomeneus challenged him, he called Aeneas to his assistance. (xiii. 462.) He also slew Ascalaphus, and while he was tearing the helmet from his enemy's head, he was wounded by Meriones, and led out of the tumult by his brother, Polites. (xiii. 517, &c.) When Athena wanted to deceive Hector in his fight with Achilles, she assumed the appearance of Deiphobus. (xxii. 227.) He accompanied Helena to the wooden horse in which the Achaeans were concealed. (Od. iv. 276.) Later traditions describe him as the conqueror of Achilles, and as having married Helena after the death of Paris, for he had loved her, it is said, before, and had therefore prevented her being restored to the Greeks. (Hygin. Fab. 110; Dictys. Cret. i. 10, iv. 22; Serv. ad Aen. ii. 166; Tzetz. ad Lycoph. 168; Schol. ad Hom. Il. xxiv. 251; Eurip. Troud. 960.) It was for this reason that, on the fill of Troy all the hatred of the Achaeans was let loose against him, and Odysseus and Menelaus rushed to his house, which was among the first that were consumed by the flames. (Hom. Od. viii. 517; Serv. ad Aen. ii. 310.) He himself was killed by Helena (Hygin. Fab. 240); according to other traditions, he fell in battle against Palamedes (Dares Phryg. 26); or he was slain and fearfutlly mangled by Menelaus (Dict. Cret. v. 12; Quint. Smyrn. xiii. 354, &c.; Eustath,. ad Hom.) In this fearful condition he was found in the lower world by Aeneas, who erected a monument to him on cape Rhoeteum. (Virg. Aen. vi. 493, &c.) His body, which remained unburied, was believed to have been changed into a plant used against hypochondriasis. Pausanias (v. 22.2) saw a statue of him at Olympia, a work of Lycius, which the inhabitants of Apollonia had dedicated there.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Deiphobus : Perseus Encyclopedia


Democoon

Democoon (Demokoon), a natural son of Priam, who came from Abydos to assist his father against the Greeks, but was slain by Odysseus. (Hom. II. iv. 500; Apollod. iii. 12.5)


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Demoleon

Demoleon, there are four mythical beings of this name, a centaur (Ov. Met. xii. 355, &c.), a son of Phrixus and Chalciope (Hygin. Fab. 14), a son of Antenor and Theano, who was slain by Achilles (Hom. Il. xx. 394), and a son of Hippasus, who was slain by Paris. (Quint. Smyrn. x. 119, &c.)


Demoleon. A son of Antenor, killed by Achilles (Hom. Il. xx. 395).


Demuchus

A Trojan, son of Philetor, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 20.457).


Dius

He was a son of Priam (Il. 24.251).


Dolops

A Trojan, son of Lampus, grandson of Laomedon, who was slain by Menelaus (Il. 15.525).


Dolon

He was the son of Eumedes, who wanted to penetrate as a spy in the camp of the Achaeans, but Odysseus and Diomedes caught him and killed him (Il. 10.314).


Doryclus

He was a son of Priam and was slain by Ajax (Il. 11.489).


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Dresus

A Trojan, who was slain by Euryalus (Il. 6.20).


Dryops

He was a son of Priam and was slain by Achilles (Il. 20.457).


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Elasus

A Trojan, who was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.696).


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Ennomus

A Trojan, who was slain by Odysseus (Il. 11.422).


Epistor

A Trojan, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 16.695).


Oileus

He was the charioteer of Bienor and was slain by Agamemnon (Il. 11.93).


Evippus

A Trojan, who was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.417).


Echeclus

Echeclus (Echeklos), a son of Agenor, who was slain by Achilles. (Hom. Il. xx. 473; Paus. x. 27). A Trojan of the same name occurs in the Iliad. (xvi. 692.)


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Echeclus

A Trojan, who was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.694).


Echemnon or Echemon

Echemon, a son of Priam, who was killed, with his brother Chromius, by Diomedes. (Hom. Il. v. 160; Apollod. iii. 12.5)


Echepolus

A Trojan, son of Thalysius, who was slain by Antilochus (Il. 4.458).


Eniopeus

He was the son of Thebaeus, charioteer of Hector and was slain by Diomedes (Il. 8.120).


Thestor

He was the son of Enops and was slain by Patroclus (Il. 16.401).


Thoas

A Trojan, who was slain by Menelaus (Il. 16.311).


Thoon

He was the son of Phaenops, brother of Xanthus and was slain by Diomedes (Il. 5.152).


Thoon

A Trojan, who was slain by Antilochus (Il. 13.545).


Thoon

A Trojan, who was slain by Odysseus (Il. 11.422).


Thoon

A Trojan, who attacked against the wall, that protected the Achaeans (Il. 12.140).


Thymbraeus

A Trojan, who was slain by Diomedes (Il. 11.320).


Thymoetes

One of the elders of Troy (Il. 3.146).


(Thumoites). One of the elders of Troy, whose son was killed by the order of Priam, because a soothsayer had predicted that Troy would be destroyed by a boy born on the day on which this child was born.


Iamenus

A Trojan, who was slain by Leonteus (Il. 12.139 & 193).


Idaeus

A messenger and charioteer of Priam (Il. 3.248, 24.325).


Idaeus

Idaeus, a son of Dares, the Trojan priest of Hephaestus. (Hom. Il. v. 11.)


Hicetaon

Son of Laomedon, brother of Priam and father of Melanippus (Il. 3.147, 15.546, 20.238).


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Ilioneus

A Trojan, son of Phorbas, who was slain by Peneleos (Il. 14.489).


Hippodamas

A Trojan, who was slain by Achilles (Il. 20.401).


Hippodamus

A Trojan, who was slain by Odysseus (Il. 11.334).


Hippolochus

He was a son of Antimachus, brother of Peisander and was slain by Agamemnon (Il. 11.122).


Hippomachus

He was the son of Antimachus and was slain by Leonteus (Il. 12.189).


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