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You are here GREECE ATHENS AKADIMIA PLATONOS
AKADIMIA PLATONOS (ATC), City quarter, ATHENS

Information on the area

Mythology (1)
   Gods & heroes related to the location (1)
Information about the place (1)
   Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1)
Monuments reported by ancient authors (5)
   Ancient sanctuaries (5)
Ancient Literature (1)
   Philosophy (1)

Mythology (1)

 Gods & heroes related to the location
Academus
Academus (Akademos), an Attic hero, who, when Castor and Polydeuces invaded Attica to liberate their sister Helen, betrayed to them that she was kept concealed at Aphidnae. For this reason the Tyndarids always showed him much gratitude, and whenever the Lacedaemonians invaded Attica, they always spared the land belonging to Academus which lay on the Cephissus, six stadia from Athens. (Plut. Thes. 32; Diog. Laert. iii. 1.9.) This piece of land was subsequently adorned with plane and olive plantations (Plut. Cim. 13), and was called Academia from its original owner.
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... EnglishHarry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English

Information about the place (1)

 Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities
Plato's Academy
Academia, (Akademeia). A public garden or grove in the suburbs of Athens, about six stadia from the city, named from Academus or Hecademus, who left it to the citizens for gymnastics. It was surrounded with a wall by Hipparchus, adorned with statues, temples, and sepulchres of illustrious men; planted with olive and plane trees, and watered by the Cephissus. The olive-trees, according to Athenian fables, were reared from layers taken from the sacred olive in the Erechtheum, and afforded the oil given as a prize to victors at the Panathenaean festival. Few retreats could be more favorable to philosophy and the Muses. Within this enclosure Plato possessed, as part of his patrimony, a small garden, in which he opened a school for the reception of those inclined to attend his instructions. Hence arose the Academic sect, and hence the term Academy has descended to our times. The appellation Academia is frequently used in philosophical writings, especially in Cicero, as indicative of the Academic sect. Sextus Empiricus enumerates five divisions of the followers of Plato. He makes Plato founder of the first Academy, Arcesilaus of the second, Carneades of the third, Philo and Charmides of the fourth, Antiochus of the fifth. Cicero recognizes only two Academies, the Old and New, and makes the latter commence as above with Arcesilaus. In enumerating those of the Old Academy, he begins, not with Plato, but Democritus, and gives them in the following order: Democritus, Anaxagoras, Empedocles, Parmenides, Xenophanes, Socrates, Plato, Speusippus, Xenocrates, Polemo, Crates, and Crantor. In the New, or Younger, he mentions Arcesilaus, Lacydes, Evander, Hegesinus, Carneades, Clitomachus, and Philo. If we follow the distinction laid down by Diogenes, and alluded to above, the Old Academy will consist of those followers of Plato who taught the doctrine of their master without mixture or corruption; the Middle will embrace those who, by certain innovations in the manner of philosophizing, in some measure receded from the Platonic system without entirely deserting it; while the New will begin with those who relinquished the more obnoxious tenets of Arcesilaus, and restored, in some measure, the declining reputation of the Platonic school.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks

Perseus: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English

Monuments reported by ancient authors (5)

 Ancient sanctuaries
Precinct of Artemis
As you go down to it you come to a precinct of Artemis, and wooden images of Ariste (Best) and Calliste (Fairest). In my opinion, which is supported by the poems of Pamphos, these are surnames of Artemis. There is another account of them, which I know but shall omit.
Perseus: Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=... English
Temple of Dionysus Eleuthereus
Then there is a small temple, into which every year on fixed days they carry the image of Dionysus Eleuthereus.
Perseus: Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=... English
Altar of Eros
Before the entrance to the Academy is an altar to Eros, with an inscription that Charmus was the first Athenian to dedicate an altar to that god.
Perseus: Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=... English
Altar of Prometheus
In the Academy is an altar to Prometheus, and from it they run to the city carrying burning torches. The contest is while running to keep the torch still alight; if the torch of the first runner goes out, he has no longer any claim to victory, but the second runner has. If his torch also goes out, then the third man is the victor. If all the torches go out, no one is left to be winner.
Perseus: Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=... English
Altars of the Muses, of Athena and of Heracles
There is an altar to the Muses, and another to Hermes, and one within to Athena, and they have built one to Heracles. There is also an olive tree, accounted to be the second that appeared.
Perseus: Pausanias, Description of Greece, Attica
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?lookup=... English

Ancient Literature (1)

 Philosophy
The Academy
The University of Tennessee at Martin.
http://www.utm.edu/research/iep/a/academy.htm
Ferry Departures
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