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Listed 5 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for destination: "EFTRISSIS Ancient city PLATEES".


Homeric world (5)

Greeks of the Homeric Catalogue of Ships

Trojan War

Eutresis participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships. The poet mentions that it was a small town of the Thespians (Il. 2.502).


Heroes

Amphion & Zethus

They were brothers, sons of Zeus and Antiope, and they came from Eutresis. They built the first walls of the seven-gated Thebes, where they became kings (Od. 11.262, Strab. 9,2,28). Previously, they had fortified Eutresis. Zethus was the husband of Aedon, daughter of Pandareus, who bore to him Itylus (Od. 19.523)., and Amphion husband of Niobe, daughter of Tantalus.


For information about Amphion & Zethus, see Ancient Thebes, Homeric World, Kings


Ancient myths

Zeus & Antiope

Antiope: In Homer (Odyss. xi. 260) a daughter of the Boeotian river-god Asopus, mother by Zeus of Amphion and Zethus. In later legend her father is Nycteus of Hyria or Hysiae. As he threatened to punish her for yielding to the approaches of Zeus under the form of a satyr, she fled to Epopeus of Sicyon. This king her uncle Lycus killed by order of his brother Nycteus, now dead, and led her back in chains. Arrived on Mount Cithaeron, she gave birth to twins--Amphion by Zeus, Zethus by Epopeus--whom Lycus left exposed upon the mountain. After being long imprisoned and ill-treated by Dirce, the wife of Lycus , she escaped to Cithaeron, and made acquaintance with her sons, whom a shepherd had brought up. She made them take a frightful vengeance upon Dirce by tying her to a furious bull, for doing which Dionysus drove her mad, and she wandered through Greece until Phocus, king of Phocis, healed her and made her his wife.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Jan 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Antiope. A daughter of Nycteus and Polyxo (Apollod. iii. 5.5, 10.1), or of the river god Asopus in Bocotia (Odyss. xi. 260; Apollon. Rhod. i. 735). She became by Zeus the mother of Amphion and Zethus. Dionysus threw her into a state of madness on account of the vengeance which her sons had taken on Dirce. In this condition she wandered about through Greece, until Phocus, the grandson of Sisyphus, cured and married her. She was buried with Phocus in one common tomb (Paus. ix. 17.4).


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