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Listed 12 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for wider area of: "SKYROS Island STEREA HELLAS" .


Homeric world (12)

Ancient towns

SKYROS (Ancient city) SKYROS

Scyrus

An homonymous city of the island of Scyrus, that was taken by Achilles (Il. 9.668).


Greek heroes of the Trojan War

Automedon, a son of Diores, was, according to Homer, the charioteer and companion of Achilles, whereas Hyginus (Fab. 97) makes him sail by himself with ten ships against Troy. According to Virgil (Aen. ii. 476), he fought bravely by the side of Pyrrhus, the son of Achilles. (Hom. Il. ix. 209, xvi. 148, 219, xvii. 429, &c., xix. 392, xxiv. 474)


Heroes

Diores

He was the father of Automedon, comrade and charioteer of Achilles (Il. 2.615).


Heroines

SKYROS (Ancient city) SKYROS

Iphis

She was the daughter of Enyeus of Scyrus, whom Achilles gave to Patroclus as a slave, after he took the island (Il. 9.667).


Perseus Project


Island

Scyrus

An island of the Aegean Sea, where Neoptolemus was born (Il. 19.325, Od. 11.509).


Kings

Neoptolemus

He was a son of Achilles, whom Odysseus led to Troy, since, according to an oracle, the town could be taken only by a descendant of Aeacus. There, like his father, he distinguished himself in the battle by his courage. After the sack of Troy, he led the Myrmidons back to Phthia and got married to Hermione, the daughter of Menelaus (Od. 3.188, 4,9, 11.506).


(Neoptolemos, also called Pyrrhus; i. e. the ruddy). The son of Achilles and Deidamia. He was brought up by his grandfather Lycomedes in Scyros. After Achilles' death, however, he was led by Odysseus to Troy, since, according to the prophecy of Helenus, that town could be taken only by a descendant of Aeacus. Here, like his father, he distinguished himself above all by a courage which none could withstand. He slew Eurypylus, son of Telephus, and was one of the heroes in the wooden horse, where he alone remained undaunted. Later legend depicts him as fierce and cruel: at the taking of Troy he killed the aged Priam at the altar of Zeus, hurled Hector's son, Astyanax, down from the walls, and offered up Polyxena upon his father's tomb. In Homer he arrives safely with much booty at Phthia, his father's home, and weds Menelaus's daughter Hermione, who was promised him during the siege of Troy. Later legend represents him as accompanied by Andromache, Hector's wife, who is allotted him as a part of his booty, and Helenus, and then, on the strength of a prophecy of Helenus, as going to Epirus and settling there. It was to a son of his by Lanassa, granddaughter of Heracles, that the later kings of Epirus traced back their descent, and accordingly styled themselves Aeacidae; while from his son by Andromache, Molossus, the district of Molossia was said to derive its name. He afterwards went to Phthia, to reinstate his grandfather Peleus in his kingdom whence he had been expelled by Acastus and wedded Hermione. He soon, however, met his death at Delphi, whither, according to one story, he had gone with dedicatory offerings, or, according to another, to plunder the temple of Apollo in revenge for his father's death. The accounts of his death vary, some attributing it to Orestes, the earlier lover of Hermione; others to the Delphians, at the instance of the Pythian priestess; others again to a quarrel about the meat-offerings. The scene of his death was the altar, a coincidence which was regarded as a judgment for his murder of Priam. His tomb was within the precincts of the Delphic temple, and in later times he was worshipped as a hero with annual sacrifices by the Delphians, as he was said to have vouchsafed valuable assistance against the Gauls when they threatened the sacred spot (B.C. 279).

This text is cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Neoptolemus : Various WebPages


SKYROS (Ancient city) SKYROS

Enyeus

King of Scyrus, father of Iphis (Il. 9.668).


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