The inhabitants KYRINAIKI (Ancient country) LIBYA - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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The inhabitants (5)

Ancient tribes

Asbystae

KYRINAIKI (Ancient country) LIBYA
  Asbystae (Asbustai, Herod. iv. 170, 171; Lycophr. Alex. 895; Asbutai, Ptol. iv. 4. § 10), a Libyan tribe, in the inland parts of Cyrenaica, S. of Cyrene, and W. of the Giligammae; distinguished above the other Libyan tribes for their skill in the use of four-horsed chariots. (Herod. l. c.) Dionysius Periegetes (211) names them next to the Nasamones, inland (mesepeiroi). Pliny also places them next to the Nasamones, but apparently to the W. of them (v. 5). Ptolemy's position for them, E. of the mountains overhanging the Gardens of the Hesperides, agrees well enough with that of Herodotus. Stephanus Byzantinus mentions a city of Libya, named Asbysta (Asbusta, Eth. Asbustes), and quotes the following line from Callimachus:
hoie te Tritonos eph hudasin Asbustao:
- where the mention of the Triton is not at all inconsistent with the position of the Asbystae, as deter-mined by the other writers ; for the Triton is frequently placed near the Gardens of the Hesperides, on the W. coast of Cyrenaica.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Auschisae

  Auschisae (Auschisai, Herod. iv. 171; Auschitai, Apollod. ap. Steph. B.; Auchisai, Diod. Sic. iii. 42; Auchitai, Ptol. iv. 5. § 21; Auchetai, Nonn. Dionys. xiii. 375), a Libyan people in Cyrenaica, W. of the Asbystae extending S. of Barca as far W. as the Hesperides (aft. Berenice), on the coast of the Greater Syrtis. Ptolemy alone places them in Marmarica.
  There are some exceedingly interesting remains of forts, of an extremely ancient style of building, which are fully described by Barth, who regards them as works of the Auschisae, and fortifies his opinion by the statement of Pliny (iv. 1), that it was the common custom of the Libyan tribes to build forts. (Beechey, Proceedings of the Expedition to explore the N. coast of Africa, pp. 251, 252; Barth, Wanderungen, &c. p. 354.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited October 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Macae

SYRTIKE (Ancient area) LIBYA
  Macae (Makai), one of the aboriginal tribes of the Regio Syrtica, on the N. Coast of Libya, on the river Cinyps, according to Herodotus, who describes their customs (iv. 175; comp. Scyl. p. 46; Died. iii. 48; Plin. vi. 23, 26; Sil. iii. 275; Ptol. iv. 3. § 27, calls them Makaioi or Makai, Surtitai). Polybius mentions Maccaei in the Carthaginian army. (Pol. iii. 33.)

Names of the inhabitants

Barcaeans

VARKA (Ancient city) LIBYA

Barcaei

Barcaei (Barkaioi), the people of Barca. This is made a separate article for the purpose of correcting the error of most compilers, who mention a Libyan tribe of the name on the authority of Herodotus. That the city was in the midst of Libyan tribes, and that its population was to a great extent Libyan, is unquestionable; but the name Barcaei, in Herodotus, always refers to the city and its neighbourhood; and it may easily be inferred from his statements that the Libyan people, among whom the city was founded, were the Auschisae Herodotus expressly distinguishes the Barcaei, together with the Cyrenaeans, from the neighbouring Libyan tribes. (iii. 13, 91.) It is true that Ptolemy calls the native tribes above the Libyan Pentapolis Barcitae (Barkeitai, iv. 4. § 9), and that Virgil (Aen. iv. 42), by a poetical anticipation, mentions the Barcaei among the native peoples of N. Africa: Hinc deserta siti regio lateque furentes Barcaei. But such expressions belong to a period when the name had been long since extended from the city to the district of which it was the capital, and which Herodotus calls Barcaea (Barkaie, iv. 171), from which district in turn, as usual, the Libyan inhabitants of later time received their name. (See also Steph. B. s. v. Barke: kai Barkaion ton Libun, Phasi Barkaion ethnos, but the reading is doubtful, and recent editors give epos.) It is not meant to be denied that the name may possibly have been of Libyan origin; but it is some-what important to observe that Herodotus does not make the statement usually ascribed to him. For the arguments in favour of the existence of Barca as a Libyan settlement before its Grecian colonization, see Pacho (Voyage dans la Marmarique, p. 175, foll.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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