EL
Greek Travel Pages

Location information

Listed 70 sub titles with search on: Sights for destination: "CHANIA Town CRETE".


Sights (70)

Castles, fortresses & fortifications

Fort Firca

  The fort still known with its Turkish name, Firca (Firka = barracks) was built in order to protect the entrance of the harbour. A thick chain from Firca to the base of the light-house closed the harbour in case of siege. The fort was the headquarters of the Military Commander of the city. The inside area was divided into barracks and ammunition warehouses. The buildings of the west wing have two-floors with dome covered rooms. Over the door of the first floor there is the following inscription : "ALOYSIUS BRAGADEUS PROVISOR CYDONIAE M. DCXX". In the centre of the court, there is a large water reservoir, where the water running from the roofs was collected. In the period of the Turkish occupation and until fairly recently, Firca was used as military barracks and a prison. The flag of the Unification of Crete to Greece was symbolically raised on the corner watch-tower on 1st December 1913.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


  The Firkas Bastion is at the western end of the outer harbour. It now houses the Naval Museum. The Venetians used it as a prison for Greeks condemned to death. Eleftherios Venizelos and King Constantine officially raised the Greek flag here in 1913. During the summer months, the Firkas is host to a local Cretan dance group that gives public performances. Plays and concerts are also performed here.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Buildings

Regional Division of Chania

Tel: +30 28213 40100-2, Fax: +30 28213 40201

Walls

The Venetian walls

  The evolution in the military arts, the discovery of gun powder and the expansion of the Ottoman empire in the Eastern Mediterranean were the main reasons that forced the Venicians to build new fortifications in the city of Hania and other strategic points nearby. The planning of the new walls was assigned to the Veronese enginner Michelle Sammichieli, who also supervised the work from 1538 to the end.The wall was given a square shape and each of the four corners was fortified with a heart-shaped bulwark. A moat was dug around the wall. There were three gates on the wall : Porta Retimiotta, the main gate; Porta Sabbionara on the east side, and a small gate at San Salvatore bulwark. The fortifications of Hania were built with local resources and the forced labour of the local villagers.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


  The Venetian walls (Venetika Teihi) contain the old city. This area is full of narrow alleyways and fine Venetian and Turkish buildings. Five sections compose the old city: Kastelli, on the hill above the harbour; Skalakia, covering the centre near the market; Splantzia, south of the city; Evraiki and Topanas, behind the Firkas in the harbour. In the thirteenth century the Genoese, traditional enemies of the Venetians, gained the support of the local population and seized the city. Twenty years later the Venetians again gained control of the city, renaming it La Canea. They quickly strengthened its fortifications and in two stages, during the fourteenth and sixteenth centuries, built the city walls. Despite these great fortifications, the city fell to Turkish invaders in 1645 after a two-month siege.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


The Bulwark of St. Nicholas of Molos

  The jetty is founded on a series of the reefs which made the harbour inaccessible to ships. Almost in the centre of the jetty is located the bulwark of St. Nicholas of Molos, named after the small church built there. The bulwark extended to the entrance of the harbour, which it protected, together with the Fort Fircas.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Bulwark San Salvatore

  This is located on the North-west corner of the Venician fortifications and it was named after the Monastery of San Salvatore, still surviving in the area. Over this bulwark, there is a four-sided watch-tower which, together with the Fort of Fircas, could protect the sea and a part of the west side of the fortifications.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Gate and Bulwark Subbionara

  Bulwark Sabbionara (of the sand) is better well known today by its Turkish name, Kum- Kapi ( Kum Kapisi = Door of the Sand). It is situated on the north-east corner of the Venician Walls and is literally built in the sea. On the front part, the visitor can still see a round emblem with the lion of St. Mark and a coat of arms. The gate is the only surviving one today, though considerably altered in the years of the Turkish occupation.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Bulwark Lando or Schiave or St. Dimitrios

  This bulwark was built on the south-west corner of the Venician fortifications and was named after the Orthodox church of St. Dimitrios, which stands in the district "Krio Vrisali" (old fountain). A circular watch-tower of the same name survives almost intact and fully restored. During excavations the "parapetto" (parapet) was revealed as well as the gun-openings. (The excavation was carried out by the 13th Agency of Byzantine Antiquities).

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Bulwark of Santa Lucia

  This bulwark is situated on the South-east corner of the fortifications. It was named after the Orthodox church of Saint Fotini (Lucia) on the street which today is called Minoos. The watch-tower, part of which still survives, was built in 1568. A large part of the bulwark was buried in the 1930s under Nikoforos Fokas and Cyprus strs.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Kastelli Walls

  The Venetians fortified the Kastelli and it was the centre of their city. The Venetians rebuilt existing walls (using many Greco-Roman remains) and created the main thoroughfare (Corso). This is the present day Odos Kanevaro and went from the east gate to the west gate (Porto Colombo) of Kastelli. The bombings of World War II destroyed both gates. There were two other gates. One is on the north-central side beside the Great Arsenale. Its steps rose to the present day offices of the Technical University of Crete. The south gate at Odos Katre is still visible. On Odos Sifaka you will see one of the minor doors of the Kastelli at Odos Katre and large portions of the inner wall with the columns and stones from Greco-Roman structures that the Venetians incorporated when they rebuilt the wall.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


The New Gate

  Because it was the last of the gates to be built, the locals called it the New Gate and the Venetians called it the Gate of Jesus. There is a plaque in the middle with the date of construction (1587) and the governor's name, Zuanne Mocenigo. This gate provided access to the provinces of Pediada, Viannos, and Monofatsi.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Buildings

Mansion of the first governor of Crete

  The residence of the first governor of Crete is between the Venizelos home and the Galiki Skoli.


Arsenali - Megalo Neorio ( The Great Shipyard )

  This is the last building on the west side of a complex of 17 shipyards. Construction of the building was begun in 1585 by the Commissioner General Alvise Grimani. The thickness of its walls, its isolation from the rest of the "Neoria", as well as the public services which were periodically housed there may account for the name "Great". The second floor, constructed in 1875 housed the school of the Christian Community. When restoration finishes it will be used by the "Mediterranean Centre of Architecture".

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


  The need for the presence of the Venician fleet in Crete forced Venice to build shipyards, (Arsenali or Neoria) where the ships were repaired in winter time. The south complex was completed in 1599, with the construction of 17 Neoria. In 1607 the construction of five more Neoria begins on the eastern basin of the harbour. These are known as the Moro Neoria and only two were ever completed. Today only 7 survive out of the 17. In their original form they were open on the side of the sea. The ceilings are arched, and they are connected with arched openings of the same thickness as the walls.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Great Arsenale

  In Chania harbour there is the Great Arsenale. This arsenal's second floor was used as a Town Hall and as a Mayor's residence during the Venetian era. The city and the University are presently making plans to restore the Arsenale.


Municipal Market

  The Market, impressive for its size and shape, was built on the remains of the bulwark Pietta Forma. The construction survey was commissioned to K. Thranthakis. The structure is in the shape of a cross with 76 shops grouped according to their wares in the four arms of the cross. The south facade is particularly well constructed out of chiselled limestone, in the architectural style of the local tradition, developed during the Venetian period. Construction was completed in 1913 and the formal opening was made by Eleftherios Venizelos on 4th December 1913 as part of the celebrations for the Unification of Crete to Greece.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


  The covered market is in the centre of the city on busy Odos Hatzi Michali Yannari. Behind the market are the old Venetian and Turkish parts of the city, while in front is the modern commercial centre of Chania. The city market (agora) of Chania is prominent on the main east-west street of Chania and dates from the beginning of the century.
A cruciform building modelled on the market at Marseilles, it stands in the place of the main entrance of the Venetian fort that surrounded the city. Materials from the fort were used to build the market. The market celebrated its eightieth anniversary in 1993. The site that the market occupies is that of the former Venetian Pittafora Bastion. West of the market's front door are some of the bastion's remains. Near these remains the large and imposing Rethimnon Gate, the main entrance to the old city, once stood.
The Public Market of Chania has many grocery shops, as well as bakeries, meat, fish, and cheese stores. Many shops sell the local, well known, Cretan herbs. There is also a variety of restaurants and cafes frequented by the Chaniotes, as the people of Chania are called, during the day. The market has a lively atmosphere, especially on Saturdays.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Important specialized building, erected in the period of the Cretan State. It is cross-shaped in plan, influenced by the buildings of the so-called Iron Age of the 19th century, which characterizes the period of the Industrial Revolution. The building is distinguished by its elegance and good balance and preserves in schematic form the typical features of the late Neoclassicism.
The building of the Market was founded on April 14, 1911 by the Municipal Manolis Mountakis and was inaugurated on December 4, 1913 by the Prime Minister, Eleutherios Venizelos, during the celebration of the Union of Crete with Greece. Since then it has been used as the town's public market.

This text is cited Feb 2003 from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture URL below, which also contains image.


Turkish Bath (Hamum)

  Public baths - Hamams constitute a very old Moslem tradition, brought by the Ottomans of Asia Minor and spread throughout their domain. According to the Koran only running water can purify. On the whole, body hygiene was closely associated with worship and meditation. The Hamam is situated on Halithon Str., near the place where a Roman Bath used to be, and is decorated with beautiful mosaics. It is a multiple-domed structure with an arcade on the perimetre, which was demolished in 1941. The Hamam was built on the site of the Venician Monastery of St. Clara opposite St. Francis.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Dikastiko Megaron (Court House building)

  Construction was begun in the late years of the Turkish occupation in order to house a military hospital. The building complex consists of several wings in the form of a free rectangle, surrounding a central court with free access from the facade. Both this complex and its morphology greatly affected the design of the modern city and the planning of some key road junctions, as well as the circus opposite the facade. The building was renovated after a destructive fire in 1936, and a third floor was added to the central part.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Tabakaria

  Tabakaria grew into a district of leather processing houses on the rocky eastern side of the city, beyond the walls, in the middle of the 19th century. This area was chosen for the following reasons : the abundant brackish subterranean waters used to soften leather, and its relative closeness to the city. Today some of the leather processing houses are still in operation. Adjusted to the natural properties of the land, the buildings have only one floor on the side of the street and two or three floors on the side of the sea. They are made of stone with tile roofs. They are built close to each other with very narrow, steep passages and steps going down to the sea. They constitute a unique architectural complex.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Religious monuments

The Ahmet Aga Minaret

  Moslem temples are a part of the religious life of the Ottoman Turks in Crete. Aga Tzami (mosque) is situated on Hatzimichaly Daliani street (former Schinoplokathika). Only the minaret and some buildings which now house a knitwear factory survive.


The former Santa Maria de Miracoli Monastery

  The monastery of the Virgin Mary of Miracles was built in 1615 by Marussa Mengano for the Dominican nuns of Hania. Today only two parts of the convent survive : the south and part of the east wall, and only a few of the cells on the south. It is located at the end of St. Marcus str. on Kasteli. The building complex has a central court like the other Venician structures. The church had one nave with a pointed arch supported by sculptured pillars. Today the visitor can see only part of the covered arcade, supported by arches, and some cells on the ground and first floors. Most of the convent was destroyed during the bombings of 1941

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Renier chapel

  This is a small chapel, part of the mansion of the Renier family on Theofanous street. It is a small, arch-covered structure. The main arch is supported by pillar-like spandrels. On the south wall, there is a post-gothic, three-lobe, blind arch of the same thickness as the wall. The chapel probably dates from the latter half of the 16th century.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


The Kioutsouk Hassan Mosque or Giali Tzamissi

  This is the only surviving mosque in the city, built in the latter half of the 17th century. Following research carried out by the 13th Agency of Byzantine Antiquities, it was discovered that a small chapel was previously built at the site. The mosque is a cubic structure covered by a large hemispheric drumless dome. On the west and north side it is surrounded by an arcade covered by six small drumless domes. Originally the arcade was open as is the custom in mosques. Around 1880 the arcade was converted into a covered one with arched openings and pronounced the neo-classical style. The mosque is the property of the Harbour Office and periodically hosts various exhibitions.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Roman Catholic Church-Chalidon street

  This three-aisle church, situated on Halithon str, is dedicated to the Virgin Mary and was inaugurated on 25th April 1879. It has been in operation since then and is the Cathedral of the Catholic diocese of Crete, as well as the parish church for the catholic parish of Hania. The Capuchin monks arrived in Hania by order of Pope Paul the 5th, in 1566. Led by father Ignatius the 4th Aritus, they established their first Monastery in Crete. Soon they opened a hospital next to the church, which they called "College". The Monastery of the Capuchin Monks took its present form in 1842, and a new wing was added in 1860. It was completely renovated in 1990-1991.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


The Franciscan Monastery of San Salvatore

  This monastery is situated within the fortifications on the north-west side. (This part of the fortress was named after the monastery.) The entrance to the nave is on Theotokopoulos str. This is the entrance for the worshipers. On one side it is connected with the monks’ cells through a covered arcade. It was constructed in three phases : Originally there was a small arch-covered chapel, probably built in the 15th century. The first extension to the west was built in the 16th century, and the church took its present form in the late Venician period. In the years of the Turkish occupation it was converted into a mosque, the Topou Aga Han or Aga Tzamissi.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Various

  The town of Chania, inhabited since ancient times till today, is with the harbour of Souda - one of the safest & largest gulfs of the Mediterranean & important Naval bases - a commercial, tourist, financial, transport, cultural and artistic centre, but it is also a live museum. The excavations of recent years on the hill of Castelli showed ceramic of all eras from the Neolithic period until Roman times. The Minoan settlement that takes up the whole of Castelli must have been quite important. The recent finding of three clay signs with the Grammic B scripture is considered to be one of the most important findings not only in the field of writing but also because it supports the theory that there was on important palace in the area.
  Apart from the archaeological sights, Chania has interesting Middle-Age & more modern monuments interspersed in various neighbourhoods. In the neighbourhood of Topchanas we can see the dominating Fort Firkas (1629). At the entrance of the port we can also see the Venetian lighthouse that was repaired by the Egyptians. The remains of the Venetian navy yard of the 15th cent.
  Very impressive, as well as the mosque of Hassan Passa at Santrivani and various churches in Splantzia, are the temples of St. Frangiskos, the temple of St. Salvador of the Frangiskans (15th to 17th cent.) which hosts the Byzantine & Post-Byzantine collection of Chania. There are also interesting monuments of the end of the 19th & the beginning of the 20th cent. such as the Town Park (1870), the Town Market (1911), the prefecture, the stadium & others.
(text: Roula Kastrinaki)
This text (extract) is cited February 2004 from the Chania Prefecture Tourism Committee tourist pamphlet.


Venetian Portal

  Next to the entrance to the Roman Catholic church on Halidon is a very interesting doorway, doubtless part of the monastery that was around the San Francesco Church, with a Latin inscription from the Venetian era.


The Waterfront ( Limani)

  The visitor can admire the harmonious matching of the architectural elements of different historical periods in the buildings along the waterfront of the Venician harbour, and those in the surrounding alleys. Most of these buildings have been converted into cafeterias and restaurants, which offer tasty dishes using mostly local products. The picturesqueness and serenity of the harbour have made it a pole of attraction both for local and foreign visitors.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


The Venician Harbour of Hania

  The harbour was first constructed between 1320 and 1356 by the Venicians to protect the City. Certain problems were caused to the habrour by the north winds and the silt deposits in the basin from rain waters and sewage. To solve these problems a jetty was built with an opening for the renewal of water. At the entrance to the harbour, there is a light-house, which was rebuilt in the period of the Egyptian occupation as it is seen today.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Odos Skridlof (Leather Street)

  Beyond the cathedral is Odos Skridlof with its concentration of leather shops. Leather goods of all sizes and descriptions are displayed here. Odos Skridlof (Leather Street) has the atmosphere of a bazaar. Here you can buy locally produced leather products as well as rugs, and other souvenirs. At the entrance of Odos Skridlof you can see remains of the old Venetian wall. The wall continues west, behind the shops on the south side, towards Odos Halidon but the stores on Odos Hatzi Michali Yannari block its view.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains image.


Kanevaro Street

  The main thoroughfare (Corso) was the present day Odos Kanevaro and went from the east gate to the west gate (Porta Colombo) of Kastelli. Along this street were the beautiful Venetian mansions of the noblemen, Permarin, Da Molin, and Zangaroli. The air raids at the beginning of the Battle of Crete in the Second World War destroyed them all. The portals from the Zangaroli mansion are in the Archaeological Museum's garden. In the Kastelli (Platia Ekaterini) there is an excavation by a Greek and Swedish group of archaeologists that found, among other things, the Masters Impression, a clay seal. The picture shows a male figure on a wall with a large size city behind it. It is dated about 1450 B.C. and it is on display in the Archaeological Museum of Chania. Substantial remains of a Minoan city, which some archaeologists believe was the ancient city of Kydonia, were found here.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Traditional settlements

The old town

  Many parts of the city have a completely different atmosphere at night. Activity within the Venetian walls starts at sunset, especially during the summer months. If possible, tour during the evening. Only the Archaeological and Naval Museums are not open at night. The city market is open in the evening on Tuesdays and Fridays.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains image.


Splantzia

  This area called Splantzia that starts at Platia 1821 (or Platia Splantzia) and goes south to the Santa Lucia Bastion, is a maze of narrow streets and is one of the more interesting and pleasant areas of Chania, mainly because it has yet to have major tourist development. Splantzia is best enjoyed in the evening. Venetian soldiers lived in the neighbourhood of Splantzia during that era, as well as the Turks during their occupation.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains image.


Topanas, The Jewish District

Following the conquest of the City by the Turks (1645), a new state of affairs is created. The turks reside mostly in the eastern districts : Kasteli and Splanzia, while the Christians live mainly in the district Topanas, on the west side of the city. This district was named after the Venician ammunition warehouse (Top-Hane in Turkish), which was situated at the beginning of Theotokopoulos str. The Jewish district was located north-west of the city, behind the harbour. The residences of the richest Jews were mainly on Konthilaki str. The visitor can still see the Synagogue, Kehal Hayyim on a side street. Gerola, basing his choice on Coronelli's map, identifies the Synagogue with the church of St. Catherine, claiming that the church was later converted into a Synagogue. The building has one large vaulted nave and two smaller chambers on the south side associated with Jewish worship. All the Jews in Hania were exterminated during World War II, when the ship on which they were trying to escape was sunk by the Germans off the coast of Hania.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Kasteli

  The area of Kastelli is the hill to the northeast of Platia Sindrivaniou. Substantial remains of a Minoan city, which some archaeologists believe was the ancient city of Kydonia, were found here. The Venetians fortified the Kastelli and it was the centre of their city. The cathedral was here, as well as many palazzos - noblemen's houses. The Venetians rebuilt existing walls (using many Greco-Roman remains).

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains image.


Squares & gardens

Platia 1821 (1821 Square)

  Platia 1821 was to the Turks what Sindrivani was to the Christians, a central meeting place. Under the square there is a partially excavated Turkish bath and a large Venetian cistern. This cistern is said to have held enough water for the city for six months. The cistern became obsolete after the earthquake of 1595 changed the course of the stream that fed it. It may be significant that the San Rocco (the saint protector against cholera) Church was built here. There is a memorial plaque to Bishop Melhisedek in the platia. The Turks, fearing an uprising, hanged him from the plane tree in 1821.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Eleftherios Venizelos Square "Sindrivani"

  At the end of Halithon street, the visitor finds Eleftherios Venizelos Square. The square used to be called "Sindrivani" (fountain) due to a small marble water fountain, decorated with lionheads and Venician coats of arms. This fountain can now be seen in the Archaeological Museum of Hania. The present square differs from the old one which was closed in by buildings. On the west side of the square was "Porta Colombo" and on the west "Porta de Cap". The north side of the square was destroyed by fire in 1932. The old City Hall is situated on the north-west corner. One of the towers of the Byzantine walls, converted into a house, stands on the opposite corner.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


At the bottom of Odos Halidon you reach Platia Sindrivaniou. Sindrivani Square was once at the heart of Chania. It was a local gathering place for Christians during the Turkish occupation. At one time the fountain in the museum garden was here. As you enter the square, directly in front of you, is a Venetian construction, the Hotel Palazzo. It has an outer staircase with the remains of a fountain below it. To the right is a large three-storey building overlooking the square, dating from the sixteenth century. This building has been a hospital, an Admiralty, and a Town Hall and is presently being renovated for future use as a hotel. Approximately 100 metres on the left from Sindrivani is a characteristic Venetian staircase under which are the remains of a fountain.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Platia 1866 (1866 Square)

  The newly renovated Platia 1866 is an important landmark in Chania. The square has statues of local war heroes and a Turkish fountain. On the southwest corner of the square, behind the Samaria and Omalos Hotels, is the long distance bus station (KTEL). Buses leave frequently from here for Iraklion, Rethimnon, Kastelli, Omalos and the Samaria Gorge, and other villages of the Nomos of Chania. There is an information booth in the station.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


The Public Garden (Kipos) of Chania

  The Turkish Pasha designed the Kipos - The Public Garden - in 1870, following the style of a formal European garden. Located in the city centre between Odos Dimokratias and Odos Tzanakaki, it encompasses a small zoo, a cafe, an open air cinema, and the city clock tower in the northeast corner.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Houses

Lithinon Street - The Government House

  The hill of Kasteli is crossed lengthwise by a wide road, the Venician Corso (today Kanevaro str.) At the end of the first vertical street on the north side (Lithinon str), was built the impressive complex of the Government House, "Palazzo". Today only the ground floor, part of the 1st floor, and the entrance to the central court survive. On Lithinon street, the frame of the entrance to the Archive still exists, dated in 1624. The Turkish Government House and the Turkish prison, where several offices of the Technical University of Crete are now housed, are nearby.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


Eleftherios Venizelos House

  The site where the Venizelos family house is built was bought by Eleftherios' father, Kyriakos Venizelos in 1876. The style is that of a villa and was finished in 1880. It has two floors and is surrounded by a garden planted with trees and vines. Later it was renovated by Eleftherios Venizelos, who transferred the reception rooms to the ground floor and the bedrooms to the first floor. Today it houses the "Eleftherios Venizelos Institution".

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


The building was constructed in around 1880 as a villa, in the square of Chalepa, the suberb of Chania. It assumed its present form in 1927 when Eleutherios Venizelos himself undertook the task to renovate the house. The outer, south staircase was then abolished and replaced by an open balcony on the first floor and a protected entrance on the ground floor. The reception halls were all housed on the ground floor and a spacious, open balcony was added to the main facade. A typical characteristic of the building was the surrounding area, especially the front garden, which was often taken care of by Eleutherios Venizelos himself.
In 1980 the building was protected by a preservation order. It still belongs to the Venizelos family.
The house was renovated in 1927 by Eleutherios Venizelos. The last restoration was carried out in 1957 by the engineer George Melakis who repaired the interior and several of the installations of the building.

This text is cited Feb 2003 from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture URL below, which also contains image.


The Gate of the Renier Mansion

  The mansion of the Venician-Cretan family Renier is situated on Theofanous str. The largest part of the impressive Renier building complex still survives, though changed by several interventions. Over the arched frame of the entrance the visitor can read the following inscription : MULTA TYLIT, FESTIUE ET STUDVIT DULCES/PATER ET ALSIT, SEMPER REQUIES GERENAT. CDC VIII. IDI. B. IAN (Much was brought, done and studied by the sweet father who laboured and sweated. Let him sleep in serene eternity. The Ides of January.)

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains image.


The French Embassy

The building housing the French Embassy in the late years of the Turkish occupation and during the period of the Cretan State, was built by the engineer Leonidas Lygounakis as a home for his son. It was finally given as dowry to his daughter Erasmia, who married the French Consul Blanc. After that it was used as the French Embassy. Today it is the property of the Technical University of Crete and is used as a cultural and conference centre.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


Residence of Baroness Von Schwartz

An exquisite example of the Neoclassical arcitecture during the last decades of the Turkish occupation. It was built in the suberb of Chalepa and is one of the most important buildings of Chania. Built as a typical villa, the house is distinguished by its elegance, the well-balanced volumes and the simplicity of the form. Of special interest is the main entrance opening to the courtyard, with the marble staircase and the porch, as well as the interior decoration of the building.
The building was constructed in 1860 and from 1965 onwards it became the centre of social and philanthropic activity in Crete during the last years of the Turkish occupation and the Harmosteia on the island. It has been proteced by a preservation order.
The building today is abandoned.

This text is cited Feb 2003 from the Hellenic Ministry of Culture URL below, which also contains image.


Beautiful locations

Halepa

  The neighbourhood of Halepa rewards the visitor with several interesting buildings, including the residence of the celebrated prime minister of Greece, Eleftherios Venizelos; the house of the first governor of Crete; the Russian-styled church of Agia Magdalini on Dagli Street; Galiki Skoli, a former convent which is now part of the Technical University of Crete; and the Tabakaria, a traditional leather processing area on the seashore.

This text is cited Nov 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains image.


Lighthouses

The Venetian lighthouse

  From the original Venician light-house which dominated the entrance of the harbour, only the base survives today, built with the same sandstone as the Walls. The present light-house, rebuilt during the Egyptian occupation (1821-1841), is different from the original and is rather reminiscent of a minaret, as regards its shape and the inside stone staircase leading to the balcony and the glass tower.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Chania URL below, which contains images.


You are able to search for more information in greater and/or surrounding areas by choosing one of the titles below and clicking on "more".

Ferry Departures
From

Copyright 1999-2019 International Publications Ltd.