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Listed 33 sub titles with search on: Ancient literary sources for wider area of: "LOKRIDA Province FTHIOTIDA" .


Ancient literary sources (33)

Demosthenes

DRYMEA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Drymus

Demosthenes, Speeches 11-20 [On the Embassy]


ELATIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Elatea

He (Philip) lost no time, collected his army, pretended to march to Cirrha, and then bade the Cirrhaeans and the Locrians alike good-bye and good luck, and seized Elatea.


Diodorus Siculus

KORSIA (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Corsiae

In Boeotia the Phocians, who held three strongly fortified cities, Orchomenus, Coroneia, and Corsiae, conducted from these their campaign against the Boeotians


Pausanias

AMFIKLIA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Amphicleia

The road from Lilaea to Amphicleia is sixty stades. The name of this Amphicleia has been corrupted by the native inhabitants. Herodotus, following the most ancient account, called it Amphicaea; but the Amphictyons, when they published their decree for the destruction of the cities in Phocis, gave it the name of Amphicleia. The natives tell about it the following story. A certain chief, suspecting that enemies were plotting against his baby son, put the child in a vessel, and hid him in that part of the land where he knew there would be most security. Now a wolf attacked the child, but a serpent coiled itself round the vessel, and kept up a strict watch. When the child's father came, supposing that the serpent had purposed to attack the child, he threw his javelin, which killed the serpent and his son as well. But being informed by the shepherds that he had killed the benefactor and protector of his child, he made one common pyre for both the serpent and his son. Now they say that even to-day the place resembles a burning pyre, maintaining that after this serpent the city was called Ophiteia. They celebrate orgies, well worth seeing, in honor of Dionysus, but there is no entrance to the shrine, nor have they any image that can be seen. The people of Amphicleia say that this god is their prophet and their helper in disease. The diseases of the Amphicleans themselves and of their neighbors are cured by means of dreams. The oracles of the god are given by the priest, who utters them when under the divine inspiration. Fifteen stades away from Amphicleia is Tithronium
This extract is from: Pausanias Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., Harvard University Press. Cited Aug 2002 from Perseus Project URL bellow, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


AVES (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Abai

In the tenth year(348 BC) after the seizure of the sanctuary, Philip put an end to the war, which was called both the Phocian War and the Sacred War, in the year when Theophilus was archon at Athens, which was the first of the hundred and eighth Olympiad at which Polycles of Cyrene was victorious in the foot-race. The cities of Phocis were captured and razed to the ground. The tale of them was Lilaea, Hyampolis, Anticyra, Parapotamii, Panopeus and Daulis. These cities were distinguished in days of old, especially because of the poetry of Homer.
The army of Xerxes, burning down certain of these, made them better known in Greece, namely Erochus, Charadra, Amphicleia, Neon, Tithronium and Drymaea. The rest of the Phocian cities, except Elateia, were not famous in former times, I mean Phocian Trachis, Phocian Medeon, Echedameia, Ambrossus, Ledon, Phlygonium and Stiris. On the occasion to which I have referred all the cities enumerated were razed to the ground and their people scattered in villages. The one exception to this treatment was Abae, whose citizens were free from impiety, and had had no share in the seizure of the sanctuary or in the war (Paus. 10.3 .1-2).

This extract is from: Pausanias. Description of Greece (ed. W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., & H.A. Ormerod, 1918). Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


LARYMNA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Larymna

On crossing Mount Ptous you come to Larymna, a Boeotian city on the coast, said to have been named after Larymna, the daughter of Cynus.


Perseus Encyclopedia

ALES (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Halai

Town of Boeotia (Paus. 9,24,5).


AMFIKLIA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Amphiclea, Amphicaea

City of Phocis, burnt by Xerxes, destroyed after Sacred War.


Atalanta

Island off Locris.


AVES (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Abai

City of Phocis


DRYMEA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Drymaia (alt. Drymus)

A town in Phocis (Hrd. 8,33).


Drymaea

City of Phocis, burnt by Xerxes, destroyed after Sacred War.


ELATIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Elateia (Elatea)


KYNOS (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Cynus

Port of Opus.(Paus. 10,1,2).


LARYMNA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Larymna

City of Boeotia, anciently belonged to Opus.


OPOUS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Opus

City of Hypocnemidian Locrians, in Locris, Abderus a native of, Patroclus at.


SKARFIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Scarphea

In Locris, Achaeans defeated by Romans at.


THRONION (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Thronium

Town of Locris, on river Boagrius.


TITHOREA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Tithorea

City of Phocis, olive oil of, people of Tithorea steal earth from tomb of Amphion and Zethus at Thebes.


YAMPOLIS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Strabo

ALES (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Halae Araphenides

Carystus is at the foot of the mountain Oche; and near it are Styra and Marmarium, in which latter are the quarry of the Carystian columns and a temple of Apollo Marmarinus; and from here there is a passage across the strait to Halae Araphenides.


ALOPI (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Alope

Next after Cynus, one comes to Alope and to Daphnus, which latter, as I said, is razed to the ground; and here there is a harbor which is about ninety stadia distant from Cynus, and one hundred and twenty stadia from Elateia, for one going on foot into the interior (Strab. 9.4.3).


DAFNOUS (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Daphnus

After Boeotia and Orchomenus one comes to Phocis; it stretches towards the north alongside Boeotia, nearly from sea to sea; it did so in early times, at least, for in those times Daphnus belonged to Phocis, splitting Locris into two parts and being placed by geographers midway between the Opuntian Gulf and the coast of the Epicnemidians (Strab. 9,3,1).
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Daphnus is now razed to the ground. It was at one time a city of Phocis, bordering on the Euboean Sea; it divided the Epicnemidian Locrians into two parts, one part in the direction of Boeotia, and the other facing Phocis, which at that time reached from sea to sea. And evidence of this is the Schedieium in Daphnus, which, they say, is the tomb of Schedius; but as I have said, Daphnus "split" Locris on either side, so that the Epicnemidian and Opuntian Locrians nowhere bordered on one another; but in later times the place was included within the boundaries of the Opuntians (Strab. 9,3,17).
These extracts are from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Aug 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


ELATIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Elateia

Delphi, I say, is famous because of these things, but Elateia, because it is the largest of all the cities there, and has the most advantageous position, because it is situated in the narrow passes and because he who holds this city holds the passes leading into Phocis and Boeotia. For, first, there are the Oetaean Mountains; and then those of the Locrians and Phocians, which are not everywhere passable to invaders from Thessaly, but have passes, both narrow and separated from one another, which are guarded by the adjacent cities; and the result is, that when these cities are captured, their captors master the passes also.
This extract is from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Aug 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


KNIMIDES (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Cnemides

After Daphnus one comes to Cnemides, a natural stronghold, about twenty stadia by sea; and opposite it, in Euboea, lies Cenaeum, a cape facing the west and the Maliac Gulf, and separated from it by a strait about twenty stadia in width.


KYNOS (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Cynus

Cynus is the seaport, a cape which forms the end of the Opuntian Gulf, the gulf being about forty stadia in extent. Between Opus and Cynus is a fertile plain; and Cynus lies opposite Aedepsus in Euboea, where are the hot waters of Heracles, and is separated from it by a strait one hundred and sixty stadia wide. Deucalion is said to have lived in Cynus; and the grave of Pyrrha is to be seen there, though that of Deucalion is to be seen at Athens. Cynus is about fifty stadia distant from Mount Cnemis.
This extract is from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Aug 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


LARYMNA (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Larymna

As one proceeds a little farther, however, there are still two small towns belonging to the Boeotians: Larymna, near which the Cephissus empties, and, still farther on, Halae, which bears the same name as the Attic demes (Strab. 9,2,13).
...
This is best shown by the Cephissus, which fills lake Copais; for when the lake had increased so much that Copae was in danger of being swallowed up (Copae is named by the poet, and from it the lake took its name), a rent in the earth, which was formed by the lake near Copae, opened up a subterranean channel about thirty stadia in length and admitted the river; and then the river burst forth to the surface near Larymna in Locris; I mean the Upper Larymna, for there is another Larymna, which I have already mentioned, the Boeotian Larymna on the sea, to which the Romans annexed the Upper Larymna (Strab. 9,2,18).
These extracts are from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Aug 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


OPOUS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Metropolis of the Locrians

Opus is the metropolis, as is clearly indicated by the inscription on the first of the five pillars in the neighborhood of Thermopylae, near the Polyandrium: "Opoeis, metropolis of the Locrians of righteous laws, mourns for these who perished in defence of Greece against the Medes." It is about fifteen stadia distant from the sea, and sixty from the seaport. Cynus is the seaport, a cape which forms the end of the Opuntian Gulf, the gulf being about forty stadia in extent.
This extract is from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Sept. 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


SKARFIA (Ancient city) FTHIOTIDA

Scarpheia

Then one comes to the Boagrius River, which flows past Thronium and empties into the sea. They also call it Manes. It is a winter stream, so that at times one can cross it dry-shod, though at other times it has a breadth of two plethra. After this one comes to Scarpheia, which is situated ten stadia above the sea, thirty stadia distant from Thronium, and slightly less from the harbor itself. Then one comes to Nicaea and Thermopylae.


TARFI (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Tarphe, Pharygae

Tarphe is situated on a height, at a distance of twenty stadia from Thronium; its territory is both fruitful and well-wooded, for already this place had been named from its being thickly wooded. But it is now called Pharygae; and here is situated a temple of Pharygaean Hera, so called from the Hera in the Argive Pharygae; and, indeed, they say that they are colonists of the Argives (Strab. 9,4,6).
This extract is from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Sept. 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks


THRONION (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Thronium

After twenty stadia from Cnemides one comes to a harbor, above which, at an equal distance in the interior, lies Thronium. Then one comes to the Boagrius River, which flows past Thronium and empties into the sea. They also call it Manes. It is a winter stream, so that at times one can cross it dry-shod, though at other times it has a breadth of two plethra.


YAMPOLIS (Ancient city) ATALANTI

Hyampolis, Hya

Hyampolis (later called Hya by some), to which, as I have said(9.2.3), the Hyantes were banished from Boeotia. This city is very far inland, near Parapotamii, and is not the same as Hyampeia on Parnassus.(9.3.15)


Thucydides

ALOPI (Ancient city) LOKRIDA

Alope

About the same time the Athenians sent thirty ships to cruise round Locris and also to guard Euboea; Cleopompus, son of Clinias, being in command.
Making descents from the fleet he ravaged certain places on the sea-coast, and captured Thronium and took hostages from it. He also defeated at Alope the Locrians that had assembled to resist him.


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