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Listed 3 sub titles with search on: Ancient literary sources for destination: "KRISSA Ancient city PARNASSOS".


Ancient literary sources (3)

Perseus Encyclopedia

Strabo

Crisa

For Crisa itself belongs to Phocis, being situated by the sea itself [...] (Strab. 9,3,1).
...
In front of Cirrha lies the fertile Crisaean Plain; for again one comes next in order to another city, Crisa, from which the Crisaean Gulf is named (Strab. 9,3,3).
...
Now Anticyra still endures, but Cirrha and Crisa have been destroyed, the former earlier, by the Crisaeans, and Crisa itself later, by Eurylochus the Thessalian, at the time of the Crisaean War. For the Crisaeans, already prosperous because of the duties levied on importations from Sicily and Italy, proceeded to impose harsh taxes on those who came to visit the temple, even contrary to the decrees of the Amphictyons. And the same thing also happened in the case of the Amphissians, who belonged to the Ozolian Locrians. For these too, coming over, not only restored Crisa and proceeded to put under cultivation again the plain which had been consecrated by the Amphictyons, but were worse in their dealings with foreigners than the Crisaeans of old had been. Accordingly, the Amphictyons punished these too, and gave the territory back to the god (Strab. 9,3,4).

These extracts are from: The Geography of Strabo, ed. H. L. Jones, Cambridge. Harvard University Press
Cited Sept. 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Homeric Hymns

But when they were passed by all the coast of Peloponnesus, then, towards Crisa, that vast gulf began to heave in sight which through all its length cuts off the rich isle of Pelops. There came on them a strong, clear west-wind by ordinance of Zeus and blew from heaven vehemently, that with all speed [435] the ship might finish coursing over the briny water of the sea. So they began again to voyage back towards the dawn and the sun: and the lord Apollo, son of Zeus, led them on until they reached far-seen Crisa, land of vines, and into haven: there the sea-coursing ship grounded on the sands.
Commentary:
The harbour of Crisa was Cirrha, which may well have been in existence and have been known by that name to the hymnwriter, although he calls it simply the "harbour". Cirrha was destroyed with Crisa, after the First Sacred War, but (unlike Crisa) was subsequently rebuilt. For the two places, which were confused by later writers, see Frazer on Paus.x. 37. 6.

This extract is from: Homeric Hymns (ed. Hugh G. Evelyn-White, 1914). Cited Nov 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


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