EL
Greek Travel Pages

Location information

Listed 9 sub titles with search on: Various locations for destination: "EGYPT Country MIDDLE EAST".


Various locations (9)

Ancient authors' reports

Nilos


Aegyptus river

The Nile is mentioned by Homer under the name of Aegyptus river (Hom.Od. 258, 14.258).


Ancient place-names

Pelusium

At the E. mouth of the Nile, near the Arabian frontier of Egypt, Pelusian mouth, Greek settlements there, Psammenitus' encampment there in Cambyses' invasion.


Pelusium

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 23/7/2001: 67 for Pelusium.


Arsinoitis

Province of Egypt.


Aias

Aias or Aeas (Aias oros, Ptol. iv. 5. § 14; Plin. vi. 29. s. 33), was a headland of the limestone range which separates Upper Egypt from the Red Sea. It was in the parallel of Thebes, and S. of the modern Koseir (Philoteras), in lat. 29 1/4. The district occupied by the Icthyophagi commenced a little to the north of the headland of Aias.


Alabastra town

  Alabastra or Alabastron (Alabastra, Alabastron polis, Ptol. iv. 5. § 59; Plin. v. 9. s. 11, xxxvii. 8. s. 32), a city of Egypt, whose site is differently stated by Pliny and Ptolemy. Pliny places it in Upper Egypt; Ptolemy in the Heptanomis. It would accordingly be either south or north of the Mons Alabastrites. It was doubtless connected with the alabaster quarries of that mountain. If Alabastra stood in the Heptanomis, it was an inland town, connected with the Nile by one of the many roads which pervade the region between that river and the Arabian hills.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Alabastrinon mountain

  Alabastrites Mons (Alabastrinon oros, Ptol. iv. 5. § 27), formed a portion of the limestone rocks which run westward from the Arabian hills into Upper and Middle Egypt. This upland ridge or spur was to the east of the city of Hermopolis Magna, in lat. 27 1/4, and gave its name to the town of Alabastra. It contained large quarries of the beautifully veined and white alabaster which the Egyptians so largely employed for their sarcophagi and other works of art. The grottoes in this ridge are by some writers supposed to occupy the site of the city Alabastra, but this was probably further from the mountain. They were first visited by Sir Gardner Wilkinson in 1824. The grottoes of Koum-el-Ahmar are believed to be the same with the ancient excavations. They contain the names of some of the earliest Egyptian kings, but are inferior in size and splendour to the similar grottoes at Benihassan. The sculptures in these catacombs are chiefly devoted to military subjects-processions, in which the king, mounted on a chariot, is followed by his soldiers on foot, or in war-chariots, with distinctive weapons and standards. The monarch is also represented as borne in a kind of open litter or shrine, and advancing with his offerings to the temple of Phtah. His attendants seem, from their dress, to belong to the military caste alone. (Wilkinson, Topography of Thebes, p. 386.; Mod. Egypt, vol. ii. p. 43.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


You are able to search for more information in greater and/or surrounding areas by choosing one of the titles below and clicking on "more".

Ferry Departures
From

Copyright 1999-2019 International Publications Ltd.