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Πληροφορίες τοπωνυμίου

Εμφανίζονται 6 τίτλοι με αναζήτηση: Τοπωνύμια για το τοπωνύμιο: "ΚΑΥΚΑΣΟΣ Βουνό ΡΩΣΙΑ".


Τοπωνύμια (6)

Αρχαία τοπωνύμια

Ceraunian Mountains & Coast

Caucasian Mountains . . . their parts next to the sea are generally called Ceraunian


Alazon river

Alazon (Plin. vi. 10. s. 11), or Alazonius (Alazonios, Strab. p. 500: Alasan, Alacks), a river of the Caucasus, flowing SE. into the Cambyses a little above its junction with the Cyrus, and forming the boundary of Albania and Iberia. Its position seems to correspond with the Abas of Plutarch and Dion Cassius.


Ceraunii Montes

  Ceraunii Montes (ta Keraunia ore), a range of mountains belonging to the system of Caucasus, at its E. extremity; but its precise relation to the main chain is variously stated. Strabo makes it the name of the E. portion of the Caucasus, which overhangs the Caspian and forms the N. boundary of Albania, and in which he places the Amazons (xi. pp. 501, 504). Mela seems to apply the name to the whole chain which other writers call Caucasus, confining the latter term to a part of it. His Ceraunii are a chain extending from the Cimmerian Bosporus till they meet the Rhipaean mountains; overhanging, on the one side, the Euxine, the Maeotis, and the Tanais, and on the other the Caspian; and containing the sources of the Rha (Volga); a statement which, however interpreted, involves the error of connecting the Caucasus and Ural chains. (Mela, i. 19. § 13, iii. 5. § 14.) Pliny gives precisely the same representation, with the additional error of making the Ceraunii (i. e. the Caucasus of others) part of the great Taurus chain. (Plin. v. 27, vi. 10. s. 11.) He seems to apply the name of Caucasus to the spurs which spread out both to the NE. and SE. from the main chain near its E. extremity, and which he regarded as a continuous range, bordering the W. shore of the Caspian (vi. 9. s. 10). Eustathius also seems to regard them as a chain running northwards from the Caucasus. (Comment. ad Dion. Perieg. 389.) Ptolemy uses the name for the E. part of the chain, calling the W. portion Caucasii M., and the part immediately above Iberia Caucasus in a narrower sense. (Ptol. v. 9. § § 14, 15, 20, 22.) On the whole, it would seem that the Greek name Ceraunius and the native Caucasus (Kawkas) were applied at first indifferently to the highest mountains in the centre of the Caucasian isthmus, and afterwards extended, in a somewhat confused manner, to the whole, or portions, of the chain; and that the more accurate writers, such as Strabo and Ptolemy, adopted a specific distinction of a somewhat arbitrary character. The Ceraunii M. of Strabo seem to be the great NE. branch which meets the Caspian at the pass of Derbend, or perhaps the whole system of NE. spurs of which that is only one. It may fairly be conjectured that Mela and Pliny were ignorant how soon these spurs meet the Caspian, and hence their error in extending to meet the Rhipaei M.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sarmaticae Portae

  Sarmaticae Portae (hai Sarmatikai pulai, Ptol. v. 9. § § 11, 15), a narrow pass of the Caucasus, whence it is also called Caucasiae Portae. (Plin. vi. 11. s. 12, 15. s. 15.) From its vicinity to the Caspian sea, it was also called by some of the ancients Portae Caspiae (Suet. Nero, 19), Claustra Caspiarum (Tac. H. i. 6), and Via Caspia (Id. Ann. vi. 33); but Pliny (l. c.) notes this as an error; and the proper Portae Caspiae were in the Taurus (Forbiger, Geogr. vol. ii. p. 47, note 92). The Sarmaticae Portae formed the only road between Sarmatia and Iberia. Ptolemy (l. c.) distinguishes from this pass another in the same mountain, which he calls hai Albaniai Pulai (Portae Albaniae), and places the latter in the same latitude as the former, namely the 47th degree, but makes its longitude 3 degrees more to the E. The Albaniae Portae are those on the Alazon, leading over the mountain from Derbend to Berdan. At both spots there are still traces of long walls 120 feet in height; and on this circumstance seems to have been founded a legend, prevalent in that neighbourhood, of the Black Sea and the Caspian having been at one time connected by such a wall. (Forbiger, Ibid. p. 55, note 13, b.; comp. Ritter, Erdkunde, ii. p. 837.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Moschici montes

  Moschici montes (ta Moschika ore, Strab. i. p. 61, xi. pp. 492, 497, 521, 527, xii. p. 548; Plut. Pomp. 34; Mela, i. 19. § 13; Ptol, v. 6. § 13; Moschicus M., Plin. v. 27), the name applied, with that of Paryadres, and others, to the mountain chain which connects the range of Anti-Taurus with the Caucasus. Although it is obviously impossible to fix the precise elevation to which the ancients assigned this name, it may be generally described as the chain of limestone mountains, with volcanic rocks, and some granite, which, branching from the Caucasus, skirts the E. side of Imiretia, and afterwards, under the name of the Perengah Tagh, runs nearly SW. along the deep valley of Ajirah in the district of Tchildir; from whence it turns towards the S., and again to the W. along the valley of the Acampsis, to the W. of which, bearing the name of the Kop Tagh, it enters Lesser Asia. (Ritter, Erdkunde, vol. x. p. 816; Chesney, Exped. Euphrat. vol. i. p. 285.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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