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Listed 100 (total found 154) sub titles with search on: Information about the place for wider area of: "MAGNESSIA Prefecture THESSALIA" .


Information about the place (154)

Miscellaneous

PORTARIA (Village) VOLOS

  The Municipality of Portaria comprises four villages perched on the slopes of northwestern Pelion. It lies between the beautiful beaches of the Pagasitikos Gulf and snow-capped peaks where exceptional ski runs have been created.
  There are dozens of hotels and hostels. There is a good road link with Volos and on the way up there is a wonderful view of Volos nestling in the bay.
  There is a police station, a post office, a bank, a medical centre and a pharmacy in Portaria.
This text (extract) is cited February 2004 from the Municipality of Portaria pamphlet (2001).


Commercial WebPages

KLIMA (Settlement) SKOPELOS

PELION (Mountain) MAGNESSIA

Commercial WebSites

PELION (Mountain) MAGNESSIA

PORTARIA (Village) VOLOS

Educational institutions WebPages

AGRIA (Municipal unit) VOLOS

General

PSATHOURA (Isolated island) ALONISSOS

Psathoura


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

AFETES (Ancient port) SOUTH PELION

Aphetae

  Aphetae (Aphetai or Aphetai: Eth. Aphetaios), a port of Magnesia in Thessaly, said to have derived its name from the departure of the Argonauts from it. The Persian fleet occupied the bay of Aphetae, previous to the battle of Artemisium, from which Aphetae was distant 80 stadia, according to Herodotus. Leake identifies Aphetae with the modern harbour of Trikeri, or with that between the island of Palea Trikeri and the main. (Herod. vii. 193, 196, viii. 4; Strab. p. 436; Apoll. Rhod. i. 591; Steph. B. s. v.; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 397, Demi of Attica, p. 243, seq.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited July 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Halonnesus

  Halonnesus (Halonnesos: Eth. Halonnesios), an island in the Aegaean sea, lying off the southern extremity of the Magnesian coast in Thessaly. The possession of this island gave rise to a dispute between Philip and the Athenians in B.C. 343, and is the subject of an oration which is included among the works of Demosthenes, but which was ascribed, even by the ancients, to Hegesippus, who was the head of the embassy sent by the Athenians to Philip to demand restitution of Halonnesus. Halonnesus lies between Sciathus and Peparethus, and appears to be the same island as the one called Scopelus (Skopelos) by Ptolemy (iii. 13. § 47) and Hierocles (p. 643, Wessel.), which name the central one of these three islands still bears. Strabo (ix. p. 436) speaks of Sciathus, Halonnesus, and Peparethus without mentioning Scopelus; while in the lists of Ptolemy and Hierocles the names of Sciathus, Scopelus, and Peparethus occur without that of Halonnesus. Halonnesus is also mentioned by Pliny (iv. 12. s. 23), Mela (ii. 7), and Stephanus B. (s. v.); but they do not speak of Scopelus. The modern island of Skopelo is one of the most flourishing in the Aegaean, in consequence of its wines, which it exports in large quantities. (Leake, Norther Greece, vol. iii. p. 111, seq.; Fiedler, Reise durch Griechenland, vol. ii. p. 13, seq.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


ALOS (Ancient city) MAGNESSIA

Halus

ho or he Halos, Alos: Eth. Haleus. A town of Phthiotis in Thessaly, mentioned by Homer. (Il. ii. 682.) It is described by Strabo as situated near the sea, at the extremity of Mount Othrys, above the plain called Crocium, of which the part around Halus was called Athamantium, from Athamas, the reputed founder of Halus. (Strab. ix. pp. 432, 433.) Strabo also says that the river Amphrysus, on the banks of which Apollo is said to have fed the oxen of Admetus, flowed near the walls of Halus. Halus is likewise mentioned by a few other writers. (Herod. vii. 173; Dem. de Fals. Leg. p. 392; Mela, ii. 3; Plin. iv. 7. s. 14.) Leake places Halus at Kefalosi, which is situated at a short distance from the sea on a projecting extremity of Mt. Othrys above the Crocian plain, exactly as Strabo has described. A Hellenic citadel occupied the summit of the projecting height; and remains of the walls are seen also on the northern slope of the hill, having short flanks at intervals, and formed of masonry which, although massive, is not so accurately united as we generally find it in the southern provinces of Greece. The walls may be traced also on the descent to the south-east, and seem to have been united at the foot of the hill to a quadrangular inclosure situated entirely in the plain, and of which the northern side followed the course of the stream, and the western the foot of the height. The walls of this lower inclosure are nine feet and a half thick, are flanked with towers, and their masonry, wherever traceable, is of the most accurate and regular kind; two or three courses of it still exist in some places. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 336.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


DIMITRIAS (Ancient city) MAGNESSIA

Demetrias

  Eth. Demetrieus. A city of Magnesia in Thessaly, situated at the head of the Pagasaean gulf, was founded about. B.C. 290 by Demetrius Poliorcetes, who removed thither the inhabitants of Nelia, Pagasae, Ormenium, Rhizus, Sepias, Olizon, Boebe and lolcos, all of which were afterwards included in the territory of Demetrias. (Strab. ix.) It soon became an important place, and the favourite residence of the Macedonian kings. It was favourably situated for commanding the interior of Thessaly, as well as the neighbouring seas; and such was the importance of its position that it was called by the last Philip of Macedon one of the three fetters of Greece, the other two being Chalcis and Corinth. (Pol. xvii. 11; Liv. xxxii. 37.) Leake remarks that it may have been recommended to the kings of Macedonia as a residence not more for its convenience as a military and naval station in the centre of Greece, than for many natural advantages, in some of which it seems to have been very preferable to Pella. The surrounding seas and fertile districts of Thessaly supplied an abundance of the necessaries and luxuries of life: in summer the position is cool and salubrious, in winter mild, even when the interior of Thessaly is involved in snow or fog. The cape on which the town stood commands a beautiful view of the gulf, which appears like an extensive lake surrounded by rich and varied scenery; the neighbouring woods supply an abundance of delightful retreats, embellished by prospects of the Aegaean sea and its islands, while Mount Pelion might at once have afforded a park, an icehouse, and a preserve of game for the chase.
  After the battle of Cynoscephalae, B.C. 196, Demetrias was taken away from Philip, and garrisoned by the Romans. (Pol. xviii. 28; Liv. xxxiii. 31.) In B.C. 192, it was surprised by the Aetolians; and the news of its defection from the Romans determined Antiochus to defer no longer his departure to Greece. (Liv. xxxv. 34, 43.) After the return of Antiochus to Asia in B.C. 191, Demetrias surrendered to Philip, who was allowed by the Romans to retain possession of the place. (Liv. xxxvi. 33.) It continued in the hands of Philip and his successor till the over-throw of the Macedonian monarchy at the battle of Pydna, B.C. 169. (Liv. xliv. 13.) Demetrias is mentioned by Hierocles in the sixth century.
  The ancient town is described by Leake as occupying the southern or maritime face of a height, now called Goritza, which projects from the coast of Magnesia, between 2 and 3 miles to the southward of the middle of Volo. Though little more than foundations remains, the inclosure of the city, which was less than 2 miles in circumference, is traceable in almost every part. On three sides the walls followed the crest of a declivity which falls steeply to the east and west, as well as towards the sea. To the north the summit of the hill, together with an oblong space below it, formed a small citadel, of which the foundations still subsist. A level space in the middle elevation of the height was conveniently placed for the central part of the city. The acropolis contained a large cistern cut in the rock, which is now partly filled with earth...Many of the ancient streets of the town are traceable in the level which lies midway to the sea, and even the foundations of private houses: the space between one street and the next parallel to it, is little more than 15 feet. About the centre of the town is a hollow, now called the lagumi or mine, where a long rectangular excavation in the rock, 2 feet wide, 7 deep, and covered with flat stones, shows by marks of the action of water in the interior of the channel that it was part of an aqueduct, probably for the purpose of conducting some source in the height upon which stood the citadel, into the middle of the city. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 375, seq.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


ESSON (Ancient city) MAGNESIA

Aeson

Aeson or Aesonis (Aidon, Aidonhis: Eth. Aidhonios), a town of Magnesia in Thessaly, the name of which is derived from Aeson, the father of Jason.


FERES (Ancient city) RIGAS FERAIOS

Pherae

  Pherai: Eth. Pheraios, Pheraeus. One of the most ancient cities of Thessaly, was situated in the SE. corner of Pelasgiotis, W. of the lake Boebeis, and 90 stadia from Pagasae, which served as its harbour. (Strab. ix. 436.) It was celebrated in mythology as the residence of Admetus and his son Eumelus, the latter of whom led from Pherae and the neighbouring towns eleven ships to the Trojan War. (Hom. Il. ii. 711-715.) Pherae was one of the Thessalian towns which assisted the Athenians at the commencement of the Peloponnesian War. (Thuc. ii.22.) At this time it was under the government of an aristocracy; but towards the end of the war Lycophron established a tyranny at Pherae, and aimed at the dominion of all Thessaly. His designs were carried into effect by his son Jason, who was elected Tagus or general-issimo of Thessaly about B.C. 374, and exercised an important influence in the affairs of Greece. He had so firmly established his power, that, after his assassination in B.C. 370, he was succeeded in the office of Tagus by his two brothers Polydorus and Polyphron. The former of these was shortly afterwards assassinated by the latter; and Polyphron was murdered in his turn by Alexander, who was either his nephew or his brother. Alexander governed his native city and Thessaly with great cruelty till B.C. 359, when he likewise was put to death by his wife Thebe and her brothers. Two of these brothers, Tisiphonus and Lycophron, successively held the supreme power, till at length in B.C. 352 Lycophlron was deposed by Philip, king of Macedon, and Pherae, with the rest of Thessaly, became virtually subject to Macedonia.
  In B.C. 191 Pherae surrendered to Antiochus, king of Syria, but it shortly afterwards fell into the hands of the Roman consul Acilius. (Liv. xxxvi. 9, 14.) Situated at the end of the Pelasgian plain, Pherae possessed a fertile territory. The city was surrounded with plantations, gardens, and walled enclosures. (Polyb. xviii. 3.) Stephanus B. (s. v.) speaks of an old and new Pherae distant 8 stadia from each other.
  In the middle of Pherae was a celebrated fountain called Hypereia. (Hupereia, Strab. ix.; Pind. Pyth. iv. 221; Sophocl. ap. School. ad Pind. l. c.; Plin. iv. 8. s. 15.) The fountain Messeis was also probably in Pherae. (Strab. ix.; Hom. Il. vi. 457; Val. Flacc. iv. 374; Plin. l. c.)
  The remains of Pherae are situated at Velestino, where the ancient walls may be traced on every side except towards the plain. On the northern side are two tabular summits, below the easternmost of which on the southern side is the fountain Hypereia, which rushes from several openings in the rock, and immediately forms a stream. Apollonius says (i. 49) that Pherae was situated at the foot of Mt. Chalcodonium (Chalko donion), which is perhaps the southern and highest summit of Mt. Karadagh.

This is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FTHIOTIDES THIVES (Ancient city) VOLOS

Thebae Phthiotides

  Phthiae (Thebai hai phthiotides, Polyb. v. 99; Strab. ix. p. 433; Thebae Phthiae, Liv. xxxii. 33), an important town of Phthiotis in Thessaly, was situated in the northeastern corner of this district, near the sea, and at the distance of 300 stadia from Larissa. (Polyb. l. c.) It is not mentioned in the Iliad, but it was at a later time the most important maritime city in Thessaly, till the foundation of Demetrias, by Demetrius Poliorcetes, about B.C. 290. ( Thebas Phthias unum maritimum emporium fuisse quondam Thessalis quaestuosum et fugiferum, Liv. xxxix. 25.) It is first mentioned in B.C. 282, as the only Thessalian city, except Pelinnaeum, that did not take part in the Lamiac war. (Diod. xviii. 11.). In the war between Demetrius Poliorcetes and Cassander, in B.C. 302, Thebes was one of the strongholds of Cassander. (Diod. xx. 110.) It became at a later time the chief possession of the Aetolians in northern Greece; but it was wrested from them, after an obstinate siege, by Philip, the son of Demetrius, who changed its name into Philippopolis. (Polyb. v. 99, 100; Diod. xxvi. p. 513, ed. Wesseling.) It was attacked by the consul Flamininus, previous to the battle of Cynoscephalae, B.C. 197, but without success. (Liv. xxxiii. 5; Polyb. xviii. 2.) After the defeat of Philip, the name of Philippopolis was gradually dropped, though both names are used by Livy in narrating the transactions of the year B.C. 185. (Liv. xxxix, 25.) It continued to exist under the name of Thebes in the time of the Roman Empire, and is mentioned by Hierocles in the sixth century. ( Thebae Thessalae, Plin. v. 8. s. 15; Thebai phthiotidos, Ptol. iii. 13. § 17; Steph. B. s. v.; Hierocl. p. 642, ed. Wess.) The ruins of Thebes are situated upon a height half a mile to the north-east of Ak-Ketjel. The entire circuit of the walls and towers, both of the town and citadel, still exist; and the circumference is between 2 and 3 miles. The theatre, of which only a small part of tile exterior circular wall of the cavea remains, stood about the centre of the city, looking towards the sea.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FYLAKI (Ancient city) ALMYROS

Phylace

  Phulake: Eth. Phulakesios. A town of Phthiotis in Thessaly, one of the places subject to Protesilaus, and frequently mentioned in the Homeric poems. (Il. ii. 695, xiii. 696, xv. 335, Od. xi. 290; comp. Apoll. Rhod. i. 45; Steph. B. s. v.) It contained a temple of Protesilaus. (Pind. Isthm. i. 84.) Pliny erroneously calls it a town of Magnesia (iv. 9. s. 16). Strabo describes it as standing between Pharsalus and Phthiotic Thebes, at the distance of about 100 stadia from the latter (ix. pp. 433, 435). Leake places it at about 40 minutes from Ghidek, in the descent from a pass, where there are remains of an ancient town. The situation near the entrance of a pass is well suited to the name of Phylace.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


GLAFYRES (Ancient city) VOLOS

Glaphyrae

  Glaphupai. A town of Thessaly, mentioned by Homer along with Boebe and Iolcos (II. ii. 712; comp. Steph. B. s. v.), but of which the name does not subsequently occur. Leake conjectures that it is represented by the Hellenic ruins situated upon one of the hills above the modern village of Kaprena, between Boebe and Iolcos. The entire circuit of the citadel on the summit of the hill may be traced, and on its lower side part of the wall is still standing.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


IKOS (Ancient city) ALONISSOS

Icus

  Icus (Ikos: Eth. Ikios), one of the group of islands off the coast of Magnesia in Thessaly, lay near Peparethus, and was colonised at the same time by the Cnossians of Crete. (Scymn. Chins, 582; Strab. ix. p. 436; Appian, B.C. v. 7.) The fleet of Attalus and the Rhodians sailed past Scyrus to Icus. (Liv. xxxi. 45.) Phanodemus wrote an account of this insignificant island. (Steph. B. s. v.) It is now called Sarakno. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 312.)


IOLKOS (Ancient city) VOLOS

Iolcus

  Iolkos, Ep. Iaolkos, Dor. Ialkos: Eth. Iolkios, fem. Iolkis, Iolkias. An ancient city of Magnesia in Thessaly, situated at the head of the Pagasaean gulf and at the foot of Mt. Pelion (Pind. Nem. iv. 88), and celebrated in the heroic ages as the residence of Jason, and the place where the Argonauts assembled. It is mentioned by Homer, who gives it the epithets of euktimene and euruchoros. It is said to have been founded by Cretheus (Apollod. i. 9. § 11), and to have been colonised by Minyans from Orchomenos. (Strab. ix.) lolcus is rarely mentioned in historical times. It was given by the Thessalians to Hippias, upon his expulsion from Athens. (Herod. v. 94.) The town afterwards suffered from the dissensions of its inhabitants, but it was finally ruined by the foundation of Demetrias in B.C. 290, when the inhabitants of Iolcos and of other adjoining towns were removed to this place. It seems to have been no longer in existence in the time of Strabo, since he speaks of the place where Iolcos stood (ho tes Iolkou topos).
  The position of Iolcos is indicated by Strabo, who says that it was on the road from Boebe to Demetrias, and at the distance of 7 stadia from the latter. In another passage he says that lolcos is situated above the sea at the distance of 7 stadia from Demetrias. Pindar also, as we have already seen, places Iolcos at the foot of Mt. Pelion, consequently a little inland. From these descriptions there is little doubt that Leake is right in placing Iolcos on the steep height between the southernmost houses of Volo and Vlckho-makhala, upon which stands a church called Episkopi. There are at present no ancient remains at this place; but some large squared blocks of stone are said to have formerly existed at the foot of the height, and to have been carried away for the construction of buildings elsewhere. Moreover, it is the only spot in the neighbourhood which has any appearance of being an ancient site. It might indeed appear, from Livy (xliv. 12, 13), that lolcus was situated upon the coast; but in this passage, as well as in Strabo, the name of lolcos seems to have been given to this part of the coast as well as to the city itself.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


KASTHANEA (Ancient city) RIGAS FERAIOS

Casthanaea

  Kasthanaia, Kastanaia, Eth. Kasthanaios. A town of Magnesia in Thessaly, at the foot of Mt. Pelium, with a temple of Aphrodite Casthanitis. It is mentioned by Herodotus in his account of the terrible storm which the fleet of Xerxes experienced off this part of the coast. Leake places it at some ruins, near a small port named Tamukhari. It was from this town that the chesnut tree, which still abounds on the eastern side of Mt. Pelium, derived its name in Greek and the modern languages of Europe.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


MAGNESIA (Ancient area) THESSALIA

Magnesia

  Magnesia, inhabited by the Magnets (Magnetes), was the long and narrow slip of country between Mts. Ossa and Pelion on the W. and the sea on the E., and extending from the mouth of the Peneius on the N. to the Pagasaean gulf on the S. The Magnetes were members of the Amphictyonic league, and were settled in this district in the Homeric times. (Il. ii. 756.) The Thessalian Magnetes are said to have founded the Asiatic cities of Magnesia on Mt. Sipylus and of Magnesia on the river Maeander. (Aristot. ap. Athen. iv. p. 173; Conon, 29; Strab. xiv. p. 647).

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


MITHONI (Ancient city) SOUTH PELION

Methone

A town of Thessaly, mentioned by Homer (Il. ii. 716) as belonging to Philoctetes. Later writers describe it as a town of Magnesia, but we have no further particulars respecting it.


NILIA (Ancient city) VOLOS

Nelia

A town of Magnesia in Thessaly, between which and lolcus Demetrias was situated. Leake identifies it with the remains of a small Hellenic town above Lekhonia.


OLIZON (Ancient city) SOUTH PELION

Olizon

  Eth. Olizonios. An ancient town of Magnesia in Thessaly, mentioned by Homer, who gives it the epithet of rugged. (Hom. Il. ii. 717.) It possessed a harbour (Scylax, p. 25); and as it was opposite Artemisium in Euboea (Plut. Them. 8), it is placed by Leake on the isthmus connecting the peninsula of Trikhiri with the rest of Magnesia.


ORMINION (Ancient city) VOLOS

Ormenium

  A town of Thessaly, mentioned in the Catalogue of Ships along with Hypereia and Asterium as belonging to Eurypylus (Hom. Il. ii. 734). It was said to have been founded by Ormenus, the grandson of Aeolus, and was the birthplace of Phoenix. (Demetr. Scepsius, ap. Strab. ix. p. 438, seq.) Strabo identifies this town with a place in Magnesia named Orminium, situated at the foot of Mt. Pelion, at the distance of 27 stadia from Demetrias, on the road passing through Iolcus, which was 7 stadia from Demetrias and 20 from Orminium. (Strab. l. c.) Leake, however, observes that the Ormenium of Homer can hardly have been the same as the Orminium of Strabo, since it appears from the situation of Asterium that Eurypylus ruled over the plains of Thessaliotis, which are watered by the Apidanus and Enipeus. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 434, seq.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PAGASSES (Ancient city) VOLOS

Pagasae

  Pagasai: also Pagasa, gen. - ae, Eth. Pagasaios, Pagasaeus. A town of Magnesia in Thessaly, situated at the northern extremity of the bay named after it. (Pagasetikos kolpos, Scylax, p. 24; Strab. ix. p. 438; Pagasites, Dem. Phil. Epist. 159; Pagasaeus Sinus, Mela, . c. c. Pagasicus, Plin. iv. 8. s. 15.) Pagasae is celebrated in mythology as the port where Jason built the ship Argo, and from which he sailed upon his adventurous voyage: hence some of the ancients derived its name from the construction of that vessel, (from pegnumi), but others from the numerous and abundant springs which were found at this spot. (Strab. ix. p. 436.) Pagasae was conquered by Philip after the defeat of Onomarchus. (Dem. Ol. i. pp. 11, 13; Diod. xvi. 31, where for Pagai we ought probably to read Pagasai.) On the foundation of Demetrias in B.C. 290, Pagasae was one of the towns, whose inhabitants were transferred to the new city; but after the Roman conquest Pagasae was restored, and again became an important place. In the time of Strabo it was the port of Pherae, which was the principal city in this part of Thessaly. Pagasae was 90 stadia from Pherae, and 20 from Iolcos. (Strab. l. c.) The ruins of the ancient city are to be seen near Volo, which has given the modern name to the bay. The acropolis occupied the summit of some rocky heights above Cape Angkistri, and at the foot of the rocks are many copious sources of water, of which Strabo speaks. But as these springs are rather saline to the taste, the city was provided in the Roman times with water from a distance by means of an aqueduct, the ruined piers of which are still a conspicuous object. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 368, seq.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PELION (Mountain) MAGNESSIA

Pelium

  Pelium (Pelion), a lofty mountain in Thessaly, extending along the coast of Magnesia. It rises to the south of Ossa, and the last falls of the two mountains are connected by a low ridge. (Herod. vii. 129.) It forms a chain of some extent, stretching from Mt. Ossa to the extremity of Magnesia, where it terminates in the promontories of Sepias and Aeantium. It attains its greatest height above Iolcos. According to Ovid it is lower than Ossa (Fast. iii. 441), which Dodwell describes as about 5000 feet high. In form it has a broad and extended outline, and is well contrasted with the steeply conical shape of Ossa. On its eastern side Mt. Pelium rises almost precipitously from the sea; and its rocky and inhospitable shore (akta alimenos Peliou, Eurip. Alc. 595) proved fatal to the fleet of Xerxes. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 384.) Mt. Pelium is still covered with venerable forests, to which frequent allusion is made in the ancient poets. Homer constantly gives it the epithet of einosiphullon (Il. ii. 744, &c.). Its northern summit is clothed with oaks, and its eastern side abounds with chestnuts; besides which there are forests of beeches, elms, and pines. (Dicaearch. Descript. Mont. Pel. in Geogr. Graec. Min. p. 106, ed. Paris, 1855; Ov. Fast. v. 381; Valer. Flacc. ii. 6.)
  Mt. Pelium is celebrated in mythology. It plays an important part in the war of the giants and the gods: since the giants are said to have piled Ossa upon Pelium, in order to scale Olympus. It has been observed that this part of the fable is well explained by the respective forms of Ossa and Pelium. As Pelium is viewed from the south, two summits are seen at a considerable distance from each other, - a concavity between them, but so slight as almost to give the effect of a table-mountain, upon which fiction might readily suppose that another hill of the conical form of Ossa should recline. (Holland, Travels, vol. ii. p. 96.) Mt. Pelium was said to be the residence of the Centaurs, and more especially of Cheiron, the instructor of Achilles, a legend to which the number of medicinal plants found on the mountain perhaps gave rise. (Dicaearch. l. c.; Hom. Il. ii. 743, xvi. 143; Pind. Pyth. ii. 83, iii. 7; Virg. Georg. iii. 92.)
  According to Dicaearchus (l. c.), the cave of Cheiron and a temple of Zeus Actaeus occupied the summit of the mountain. The same writer relates that it was the custom of the sons of the principal citizens of Demetrias, selected by the priest, to ascend every year to this temple, clothed with thick skins, on account of the cold. Between the two summits of Mt. Pelium there is a fine cavern, now commonly known by the name of the cave of Achilles, and which accords with the position of the cave of Cheiron, mentioned by Dicaearchus. The same writer likewise speaks of two rivers of Mt. Pelium, called Crausindon and Brychon. One of them is now named Zervokhia, and falls into the gulf between Nekhori and St. George. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 384, seq.) Lastly, Pelium was connected with the tale of the Argonauts, since the timber of which their ship was built was cut down in the forests of this mountain. The north-western summit of Mt. Pelium is now named Plessidhi but the mountain is frequently called Zagora, from the; town of this name immediately below the summit on the eastern side. (Leake, l. c. Mezieres, Memoire sur Ie Pelion et l'Ossa, Paris, 1853.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PTELEOS (Ancient city) ALMYROS

Pteleum

  Pteleon Eth. Pteleates, Pteleousios, Pteleeus. A town of Thessaly, on the south-western side of Phthiotis, and near the entrance of the Sinus Pagasaeus. It stood between Antron and Halos, and was distant from the latter 110 stadia, according to Artemidorus. (Strab. ix. p. 433.) It is mentioned by Homer as governed by Protesilaus, to whom the neighbouring town of Antron also belonged. (Il. ii. 697.) In B.C. 192, Antiochus landed at Pteleum in order to carry on the war against the Romans in Greece (Liv. xxxv. 43). In B.C. 171, the town, having been deserted by its inhabitants, was destroyed by the consul Licinius. (Liv. xlii. 67.) It seems never to have recovered from this destruction, as Pliny speaks of Pteleum only as a forest ( nemus Pteleon, Plin. iv. 8. s. 15). The form Pteleos is used by Lucan (vi. 352) and Mela (ii. 3). Pteleum stood near the modern village of Pteleo, or Ftelio, upon a peaked hill crowned by the remains of a town and castle of the middle ages, called Old Ftelio. On its side is a large marsh, which, as Leake observes, was probably in the more flourishing ages of Greece a rich and productive meadow, and hence the epithet of lechepoien, which Homer has applied to Pteleum. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. i.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PYRASSOS (Ancient city) VOLOS

Pyrasus

  Purasos, Purrhasos, Eth. Purasaios. A town of Phthiotis in Thessaly, mentioned by Homer along with Phylace and Iton, and described by him as Purrhason anthemoenta, Demetros temenos. (Il. ii. 695.) Pyrasus was situated on the Pagasaean gulf, at the distance of 20 stadia from Thebes, and possessed a good harbour (eulimenos, Strab. ix. p. 435). It had disappeared in the time of Strabo. Its name was superseded by that of Demetrium, derived from the temple of Demeter, spoken of by Homer, and which Strabo describes as distant two stadia from Pyrasus. Demetrium is mentioned as a town of Phthiotis by Scylax (p. 24, Hudson), Livy (xxviii. 6), Stephanus B. (s. v. Demetrion), and Mela (ii. 3). Leake places Pyrasus at Kokkina, where there are vestiges of an ancient town, consisting of wrought quadrangular blocks, together with many smaller fragments, and an oblong height with a flat summit, partly if not wholly artificial. He also states that at Kokkina there is a circular basin full of water near the shore, which was once probably a small harbour, since there are traces of a mole not far from it. The exact site of the temple was probably at a spot, 5 minutes short of Kokkina, where exist many stones and some hewn blocks. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 366.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


RIZOUS (Ancient city) THESSALIA

Rhizus

  Pizous. A port-town of Pontus, at the mouth of the river Rhizius, about 120 stadia to the east of the river Calus, and 30 stadia west of the mouth of the Ascurus. In the time of Procopius (Bell. Goth. iv. 2) the place had risen to considerable importance, so that Justinian surrounded it with strong fortifications. The Table mentions on its site a place under the name of Reila, which is probably only a corruption of the right name, which still exists in the form of Rizeh, though the place is also called Irrish.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


SIPIAS (Ancient city) SOUTH PELION

Sepias

A promontory of Magnesia, opposite the island of Sciathos, and forming the SE. extremity of Thessaly. It is now called C. St. George. It is celebrated in mythology as the spot where Peleus laid in wait for Thetis, and from whence he carried off the goddess (Eurip. Androm. 1266) and in history as the scene of the great shipwreck of the fleet of Xerxes.


Sciathus

  Sciathus (Skiathos: Eth. Skiathios: Skiatho), a small island in the Aegaean sea, N. of Euboea, and a little E. of the Magnesian coast of Thessaly, is described by Pliny as 15 miles in circumference (iv. 12. s. 23). It is said to have been originally colonised by Pelasgians from Thrace, who were succeeded by Chalcidians from Euboea. (Scymn. Ch. 584.) It possessed two towns, one of which was also called Sciathus, but the name of the other is unknown. (Scylax, p. 23, Hudson; Strab. ix. p, 436; Ptol. iii. 13. § 47.) It is frequently mentioned in the history of the invasion of Greece by Xerxes, since the persian and grecian fleets were stationed near its coasts. (Herod. vii. 176, 179, 182, 183, viii. 7.) it afterwards became one of the subject allies of athens, but was so insignificant that it had to pay only the small tribute of 200 drachmae yearly. (Franz, Elem. Epigr. 52.) the town of sciathus was destroyed by the last philip of macedonia, B.C. 200, to prevent its falling into the hands of Attalus and the Romans. (Liv. xxxi. 28, 45.) In the Mithridatic War it was one of the haunts of pirates. (Appian, Mithr. 29.) It was subsequently given by Antony to the Athenians. (Appian, B.C. v. 7.) Sciathus was celebrated for its wine (Athen, i. p. 30, f.), and for a species of fish found off its coasts and called kestreus. (Athen. i. p. 4, c.; Pollux, vi. 63.) the modern town lies in the se. part of the island, and possesses an excellent harbour. The inhabitants have only been settled here since 1829, previous to which time their town stood in the NE. part of the island upon a rock projecting into the sea, and accessible only upon one side, as more secure against the pirates. Ross says that the new town stands upon the site of the ancient city, but the latter was not the homonymous capital of the island, which occupied the site of the old town in the NE. part of the island, as appears from an inscription found there by Leake. The ancient city in the SE. of the island, upon which the modern town now stands, is probably the second city mentioned by Scylax, but without a name. (Ross, Wanderungen in Griechenland, vol. ii. p. 50; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 111.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Peparethos

  Peparethos, Eth. Peparethios. An island in the Aegaean sea, lying off the coast of Thessaly, to the east of Halonnesus. Pliny describes it as 9 miles in circuit, and says that it was formerly called Evoenus (iv. 12. s. 23). It was said to have been colonised by some Cretans under the command of Staphylus. (Scymn. Ch. 579; Hom. Hymn. Apoll. 32.) Peparethus was an island of some importance, as appears from its frequent mention in history, and from its possessing three towns (tripolis, Scylax, p. 23), one of which bore the same name as the island. (Strab. ix. p. 436.) The town suffered from an earthquake in the Peloponnesian War, B.C. 426. (Thuc. iii. 89.) It was attacked by Alexander of Pherae (Diod. xv. 95), and the island was laid waste by Philip, because the inhabitants, at the instigation of the Athenians, had taken; possession of Halonnesus. (Dem. de Cor. p. 248, Epist. Phil. p. 162.) In B.C. 207, Philip sent a garrison to the city of Peparethus, to defend it against the Romans (Liv. xxviii. 5); but he destroyed it in B.C. 200, that it might not fall into the hands of the latter. (Liv. xxxi. 28.) Peparethus; was celebrated in antiquity for its wine (Athen. i, p. 29; Heracl. Pont. Fragm. 13; Plin. xiv. 7. s. 9) and oil. (Ov. Met. vii. 470) Diodes, the earliest Greek historian who wrote upon the foundation of Rome, was a native of Peparethus. Peparethus is now called Khilidhromia, and still produces wine, which finds a good market on the mainland.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


SPALAFTHRA (Ancient city) SOUTH PELION

Spalathra

Spalauthra, Spalethre, Spalathron, Eth. Spalathraios. A town of Magnesia, in Thessaly, upon the Pagasaean gulf. It is conjectured that this town is meant by Lycophron (899), who describes Prothous, the leader of the Magnetes in the Iliad, as ho ek Palauthron (Spalauthron).


Cicynethus

  Cicynethus (Kikunethos: trikeri), a small island off the coast of Thessaly in the Pagasaean gulf. (Scylax, p. 29; Artemiod. ap. Strab. ix. p. 436; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iv. p. 396.)


VIVI (Ancient city) MAGNESSIA

Boebe

  Boibe: (Eth. Boibeus, fem. Boibeis), a town of Magnesia in Thessaly, mentioned by Homer, and situated on the eastern side of the lake, called after it Boebeis Lacus (Boibeis limne, Horn. Il. ii. 712; Herod. vii. 129, et alii; also Boibia limne, Eurip. Alc. 590; and Boibias, Pind. Pyth. iii. 34.) The lake is frequently mentioned by the ancient writers, but the name of the town rarely occurs. The lake receives the rivers Onchestus, Amyrus, and several smaller streams, but has no outlet for its waters. From its proximity to Mt. Ossa, it is called Ossaea Boebeis by Lucan (vii. 176). Athena is said to have bathed her feet in its waters (Hes. ap. Strab. ix. p. 442), which is perhaps the reason why Propertius (ii. 2. 11) speaks of sanctae Boebeidos undae. The lake is a long narrow piece of water, and is now called Karla from a village which has disappeared. It produces at present a large quantity of fish, of which no mention is made in the ancient writers, unless, as Leake suggests, Boibe should be substituted for Bolbe in a fragment of Archestratus quoted by Athenaeus (vii. p. 311, a.). The same writer remarks that the numerous flocks on the heights around the villages of Kaprena and Kanalia on the lake illustrate the epithet polumelotate bestowed upon Boebe by Euripides; while the precipitous rocks of Petra are probably the Boibiados kremnoi alluded to by Pindar.
  The town of Boebe was at a later time dependent upon Demetrias. Its site and remains are described by Leake. It occupied a height advanced in front of the mountain [of Kanulia], sloping gradually towards the plain, and defended by a steep fall at the back of the hill. It appears to have been constructed of Hellenic masonry, properly so called. The acropolis may be traced on the summit, where several large quadrangular blocks of stones are still in their places, among more considerable ruins formed of small stones and mortar. Of the town walls there are some remains at a small church dedicated to St. Athanasius at the foot of the hill, where are several large masses of stone showing, by their distance from the acropolis, that the city was not less than two miles in circumference.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Halonnesus

   (Halonnesos), and Halonesus (Halonesos). An island of the Aegaean Sea, off the coast of Thessaly, and east of Sciathos and Peparethos, with a town of the same name upon it. The possession of this island occasioned great disputes between Philip and the Athenians: there is a speech on this subject among the extant orations of Demosthenes, but probably written by Hegesippus.


DIMITRIAS (Ancient city) MAGNESSIA

Demetrias

nbsp;  A town in Magnesia in Thessaly, on the innermost recesses of the Pagasaean Gulf, founded by Demetrius Poliorcetes, and peopled by the inhabitants of Iolcus and the surrounding towns. Its position was such that it was styled by the last Philip of Macedon one of the three fetters of Greece, the other two being Chalcis and Corinth.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FERES (Ancient city) RIGAS FERAIOS

Pherae

   (Pherai). An ancient town of Thessaly in the Pelasgian plain, ninety stadia from its porttown Pagasae, on the Pagasaean Gulf. It is celebrated in mythology as the residence of Admetus, and in history on account of its tyrants, who extended their power over nearly the whole of Thessaly. Of these the most powerful was Iason, who was made Tagus, or military chief, of Thessaly about B.C. 374.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FTHIOTIDES THIVES (Ancient city) VOLOS

Thebae

Called Phthioticae (hai Phthiotides), an important city of Thessaly in the district Phthiotis, at a short distance from the coast, and with a good harbour.


FYLAKI (Ancient city) ALMYROS

Phylace

(Phulake). A small town of Thessaly in Phthiotis, the birthplace of Protesilaus, hence called Phylacides; his wife Laodamia is also called Phylaceis.


IOLKOS (Ancient city) VOLOS

Iolcus

(Iolkos). An ancient town in Magnesia in Thessaly, at the top of the Pagasean Gulf, about a mile from the sea. It was celebrated in mythology as the residence of Pelias and Iason, and as the place from which the Argonauts sailed in quest of the golden fleece.


KASTHANEA (Ancient city) RIGAS FERAIOS

Casthanaea

A town of Thessaly, on the coast of Magnesia, northwest of the promontory Sepias. It is noticed by Herodotus in his account of the terrible storm experienced by the fleet of Xerxes off this coast.


MAGNESIA (Ancient area) THESSALIA

Magnesia

A narrow strip of country along the eastern coast of Thessaly, extending from the Peneus on the north to the Pagasaean Gulf on the south. Its inhabitants, the Magnetes, are said to have founded the two cities in Asia mentioned below.


PELION (Mountain) MAGNESSIA

Pelion

   (to Pelion oros), more rarely Pelios (Pelios). A lofty range of mountains in Thessaly, in the district of Magnesia, situated between the lake Boebeis and the Pagasaean Gulf. Its sides were covered with wood, and on its summit was a temple of Zeus Actaeus. Mount Pelion was celebrated in mythology. Near its summit was the cave of the Centaur Chiron. The Giants, in their war with the gods, are said to have attempted to heap Ossa and Olympus on Pelion, or Pelion and Ossa on Olympus, in order to scale heaven. On Pelion the timber was felled with which the ship Argo was built.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PEPARITHOS (Ancient city) SKOPELOS

Peparethus

A small island in the Aegaean Sea, off the coast of Thessaly, and east of Halonesus. It produced a considerable quantity of wine.


PTELEOS (Ancient city) ALMYROS

Pteleum

(Pteleon). An ancient seaport town of Thessaly in the district Phthiotis, at the southwestern extremity of the Sinus Pagasaeus, was destroyed by the Romans.


RIZOUS (Ancient city) THESSALIA

Rhizus

(Rhizous). A town of Magnesia in Thessaly.


SIPIAS (Ancient city) SOUTH PELION

Sepias

Now St. George. A promontory in the southeast of Thessaly, in the district Magnesia, on which a great part of the fleet of Xerxes was wrecked.


Sciathus, (Skiathos)

Now Skiatho; a small island in the Aegaean Sea, north of Euboea and east of the Magnesian coast of Thessaly, with a town of the same name upon it. Near it both the Greek and the Persian fleets were stationed at the time of the invasion by Xerxes.


Links

MAGNESIA (Ancient area) THESSALIA

Magnesia

  Peninsula of Thessalia north of Euboea.
  Magnesia owed its name to the mythological hero Magnes, a son of Aeolus, who was himself the father of Polydectes, the tyrant of the island of Seriphos where Perseus, still a baby, and his mother Danae landed after being abandoned at sea by Danae's father Acrisius, and of Dictys, who found them and became their protector against his brother who had fallen in love with Danae.

Bernard Suzanne (page last updated 1998), ed.
This text is cited July 2003 from the Plato and his dialogues URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks.


PELION (Mountain) MAGNESSIA

Local government Web-Sites

ALONISSOS (Municipality) NORTH SPORADES

Municipality of Alonissos


ARGALASTI (Municipal unit) SOUTH PELION

Municipality of Argalasti


ARTEMIDA (Municipal unit) VOLOS

Municipality of Artemida


IOLKOS (Municipal unit) VOLOS

Municipality of Iolkos


MAGNESSIA (Prefecture) THESSALIA

Prefecture of Magnesia


MAKRINITSA (Municipal unit) VOLOS

Community of Makrynitsa


MILIES (Municipal unit) SOUTH PELION

Municipality of Milies


MOURESSI (Municipal unit) ZAGORA-MOURESI

Municipality of Mouressi


NEA IONIA (Municipal unit) VOLOS

Municipality of Nea Ionia


PORTARIA (Municipal unit) VOLOS

Municipality of Portaria


PTELEOS (Municipal unit) ALMYROS

Municipality of Pteleos


Municipality of Skiathos


SKIATHOS (Municipality) NORTH SPORADES

Municipality of Skiathos


SKOPELOS (Municipality) NORTH SPORADES

Municipality of Skopelos


VOLOS (Municipal unit) MAGNESSIA

Municipality of Volos


ZAGORA (Municipal unit) MAGNESSIA

Municipality of Zagora


Local government WebPages

Agios Dimitrios

  This is the fifth municipal region one comes across when travelling from Volos. A picturesque village, the balcony of Pelion one could say, having a marvelous view of the Aegean Sea. The cobbled roads, the footpaths and the fountains made of stone, offer a fine opportunity for long walks inside the village as well as the forest. The picturesque churches of Agios Georgios, Agios Dimitrios, Agios Ioannis Theologos, Metamorfosi tou Sotiros and Panagia are decorated with marvelous murals and woodcut iconostasis worth seeing. The byzantine church of Metamorfosi tou Sotiros is the only church in Pelion having five domes.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


Anilio

  The sixth and last municipal region one meets when travelling from Volos is Anilio. This mountainous village seems chiseled upon the green slopes of the mountain. A landscape of the mountainous Pelion "drowned" by dense vegetation of chestnut and walnut trees. The picturesque churches and shrines, especially those of Panagia, Agia Triada (Holy Trinity ) with murals and Agios Athanasios with marvelous woodcut iconostasis and samples of three-aisled basilica. At 4 km from the village there are the beautiful beaches of Banika and Plaka.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


Kissos

  Kissos is the 4th region one come across when travelling from Volos. This is a shady, mountain village in an altitude of 500meters above the sea level, built between beeches and chestnut trees coiled by ivies, creating a feast of a totally green landscape. Historically Kissos, between 1881 and 1912 used to be the center of a municipality including the boroughs of Agios Ioannis, Agios Dimitrios, Agios Konstantinos and the village of Anilio. In 1753, according to tradition, Rigas Feraios, taught at its school. At the paved square, one can see the famous Basilica of Agia Marina, built in the 17th c., famous for its golden-platted iconostasis, made of hand curved linden, worked by three generations of artisans from Epirus. The famous artist from Epirus, Ioannis Pagonis, painted its hagiographies. The byzantine icons of the church were donated by monks from Mount Athos. Because of its importance, the church of Agia Marina has been declared a landmark.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


Mouressi

  The 3rd region one comes across when travelling from Volos is Mouresi. A picturesque, mountainous village filled with vegetation and spring waters persuading the visitor for a more detailed visit. The picturesque churches of Agia Paraskevi and the Assumption, built around the end of the 18thc., as well as those of Agia Triada (Holy Trinity), Agios Fanourios and of Stavros (of the Cross), reveal the characteristic art of the masons of another era. 5Km away, there is the picturesque borough of Damouhari, the only natural harbor of the East Pelion. Its magnificent beach with its white pebbles in the wild, natural and impressive landscape stimulates the visitor. At the top of a small hill there is an ancient, deserted Venetian Castle. The old, filled with hagiographies, country church of Agios Nicolaos is also worth visiting. 4Km away there is the splendid and unique beach of Papa-Nero, having a Camping-site, taking up a large area of sable and pebbles, revealing thus its characteristic peculiarity.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


(Following URL information in Greek only)


PANORMOS (Ancient city) SKOPELOS

Panormos

Photo Album in URL, information in Greek only


PILIO (Ski centre) PELION

  Pelion is the perfect place for holidays, all seasons of the year. Especially, during winter, people from all over the world are gathered here, in Pelion Ski Center, to enjoy the snow and winter sports. Have you ever imagined skiing with a view over the Aegean Sea? This unique combination of mountain and sea is to be found at Pelion Ski Center! Descend the pure white slopes of Pelion with the blue of the sea keeping you company... Enjoy your favorite sport or learn how to ski and have the fun of a lifetime!
  Pelion Ski Center offers modern facilities, easy and more difficult tracks for ski or snowboard, expert and skilled teachers, teleferique, locker rooms and restaurant-cafeteria.

This text is cited September 2004 from the Municipality of Portaria URL below, which contains images


SELINOUS (Ancient city) SKOPELOS

The city of Skiathos

  The city of Skiathos is the only built-up area of the island. It is built on the southeastern tip of the island in a windless bay which separates the island of Bourtzi in two. It is a relatively new settlement, built in 1829 - 1830 on the site of the ancient city, on two hills situated at the edge of the sea. The ancient settlement was built in 800 BC. The large natural port of the modern city is ideal in shape and in location. This has been a basic element in regulating the life on the island both in the old and in the modern times. In the modern city of Skiathos, the houses are small and simple, with two floors in their majority and built amphitheatrically one next to the other. The streets are narrow without any typical planning apart from few parts in the city.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from the Municipality of Skiathos URL below, which contains images.


STAFYLOS (Settlement) SKOPELOS

(Following URL information in Greek only)


Tsagarada

  Tsagarada is the second region one comes across when travelling from Volos. This is one of the most appealing villages of Pelion. It can be reached through a densely vegetated forest and it offers unforgettable experiences, combining both the mountain landscape and the splendid blue beaches of the Aegean Sea.
   Its history begins in 1500DC and its greatest peak is depicted upon the impressive mansions and its ancient churches that give their name to the boroughs of Agioi Taxiarhes, Agia Paraskevi, Agios Stefanos, Agia Kiriaki and Agios Georgios. The most characteristic of all, is Agioi Taxiarhes having a miracle depicted upon the woodcut iconostasis. At the square that bears the same name, one can see four fountains. There is also Agia Paraskevi, built in 1909. At its square there is the famous thousand-year-old plane tree whose perimeter is about 13m and under it there is the famous arched fountain built in stone. Both Agia Kiriaki and Agios Georgios have characteristic old, stone-built campaniles.
   Almost 7Km away there is the magnificent beach of Milopotamos, divided in two by huge, impressive rocks. A little bit more to the north there is Karavostasia, where, as the historian Herodotus narrates, according to myth, Xerxis fleet crashed in AD480. Towards the north, 5,5Km away, one can find the beautiful beach of Fakistra with its emerald waters. At its left, there is Palaiokastro (meaning Old Castle). It is said that right here used to be the village. One can see the remnants of a Castle while not far away, there is the ancient country church of Panagia Megalomata in the rock cave where the "Secret School" used to be.

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


Xorychti

  Leaving Volos behind, the first region one comes across is Xourihti, a picturesque region built upon a densely vegetated precipitous gorge with a magnificent view of the Aegean Sea. This colorful region has been named after an old mine-quarry. Its old and well-preserved churches (Panagia, Agioi Pantes, Agios Konstantinos, Agia Barbara) are points of interest for every visitor. Another worth visiting place is Rahi and its natural cave with built stone benches inside it. The old fountains and the Centaurs' cave may also attract the interest of any visitor. Walking down the country footpath or driving through a 4 Km passable earthen road one can visit the blue beach of Limnionas

This text is cited Sep 2002 from an old URL of the Municipality of Mouressi


Maps

MAGNESSIA (Prefecture) THESSALIA

PTELEOS (Municipal unit) ALMYROS


    English Greek

Ministry of Culture WebPages

MAGNESSIA (Prefecture) THESSALIA

Prefecture of Magnessia

In the following WebPages you can find an interactive map with all the monuments and museums of the Prefecture, with relevant information and photos.


Non-profit organizations WebPages

Agios Georgios Nilias


AGRIA (Small town) VOLOS

Almyros


CHANIA (Settlement) VOLOS

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