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Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Astypalaea

ASTYPALEA (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  Astupalaia, Eth. Astupalaieus, Astupalaiates, Astypalaeensis. Called by the present inhabitants Astropalaea, and by the Franks Stampalia), an island in the Carpathian sea, called by Strabo (x. p. 392) one of the Sporades, and by Stephanus B. (s. v.) one of the Cyclades, said to be 125 (Roman) miles from Cadistus in Crete (Plin. iv. 12. s. 23), and 800 stadia from Chalcia, an island near Rhodes. (Strab. l. c.) Pliny describes Astypalaea (l. c.) as 88 miles in circumference. The island consists of two large rocky masses, united in the centre by an isthmus, which in its narrowest part is only 450 or 500 feet across. On the N. and S. the sea enters two deep bays between the two halves of the island; and the town, which bore the same name as the island, stood on the western side of the southern bay. To the S. and E. of this bay lie several desert islands, to which Ovid (Ar. Am. ii. 82) alludes in the line:--cinctaque piscosis Astypalaea vadis. From the castle of the town there is an extensive prospect. Towards the E. may be seen Cos, Nisyros, and Telos, and towards the S. in clear weather Casos, Carpathus, and Crete.
  Of the history of Astypalaea we have hardly any account. Stephanus says that it was originally called Pyrrha, when the Carians possessed it, then Pylaea, next the Table of the Gods (Theon trapeza), on account of its verdure, and lastly Astypalaea, from the mother of Ancaeus. (Comp. Paus. vii. 4. § 1.) We learn from Scymnus (551) that Astypalaea was a colony of the Megarians, and Ovid mentions it as one of the islands subdued by Minos. ( Astypaleia regna, Met. vii. 461.) In B.C. 105 the Romans concluded an alliance with Astypalaea (Bockh, Inscr. vol. ii. n. 2485), a distinction probably granted to the island in consequence of its excellent harbours and of its central position among the European and Asiatic islands of the Aegaean. Under the Roman emperors Astypalaea was a libera civitas. (Plin. l. c.) The modern town contains 250 houses and not quite 1500 inhabitants. It belongs to Turkey, and is subject to the Pashah of Rhodes, who allows the inhabitants, however, to govern themselves, only exacting from them the small yearly tribute of 9500 piastres, or about 601. sterling. This small town contains an extraordinary number of churches and chapels, sometimes as many as six in a row. They are built to a great extent from the ruins of the ancient temples, and they contain numerous inscriptions. In every part of the town there are seen capitals of columns and other ancient remains. We learn from inscriptions that the ancient city contained many temples and other ancient buildings. The favourite hero of the island was Cleomedes, of whose romantic history an account is given elsewhere. Cicero probably confounds Achilles with this Cleomedes, when he says (de Nat. Deor. iii. 18) that the Astypalaeenses worship Achilles with the greatest veneration.
  Hegesander related that a couple of hares having been brought into Astypalaea from Anaphe, the island became so overrun with them that the inhabitants were obliged to consult the Delphic oracle, which advised their hunting them with dogs, and that in this way more than 6000 were caught in one year. (Athen. ix. p. 400, d.) This tale is a counterpart to the one about the brace of partridges introduced from Astypalaea into Anaphe. Pliny (viii. 59) says that the muscles of Astypalaea were very celebrated; and we learn from Ross that they are still taken off the coast.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Calymna

KALYMNOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  Calymna (Kalumna, Kalumna: Eth. Kalumnios: Kalimno), an island off the coast of Caria between Leros and Cos. It appears to have been the principal island of the group which Homer calls Calydnae (nesoi Kaludnai, Il. ii. 677): the other islands were probably Leros, Telendos, Hypseremos (Hypsereisma) and Plate. (Comp. Strab. x. p. 489.) Calymna is the correct orthography, since we find it thus written on coins and inscriptions. (Bockh, Inscr. No. 2671.) This form also occurs in Scylax, Strabo, Ovid, Suidas, and the Etymologicum Magnum; but out of respect for Homer, whose authority was deemed paramount, most of the ancient writers call the island Calydna, and some were even led into the, error of making two different islands, Calydna and Calymna. (Plin. iv. 12. s. 23; Steph. B, s. vv.)
  The island was originally inhabited by Carians, and was afterwards colonised by Thessalian Aeolians or Dorians under Heraclid leaders. It also received an additional colony of Argives, who are said to have been shipwrecked on the island after the Trojan war. (Diod. v. 54; Hom. Il. ii. 675.) At the time of the Persian war it was subject to Artemisia of Halicarnassus, together with the neighbouring islands of Cos. and Nisyrus. (Herod. vii. 99.)
  Calymna is an island of some size, and contains at present 7000 inhabitants. A full account of it, together with a map, is given by Ross in the work cited below. The description of Ovid (de Art. Am. ii. 81) - silvis umbrosa Calymne - does not apply to the present condition of the island, and was probably equally inapplicable in antiquity; since the island is mountainous and bare. It produces figs, wine, barley, oil, and excellent honey; for the latter it was also celebrated in antiquity. (Fecundaque melle Calymne, Ov. Met. viii. 222; Strab. l. c.)
  With respect to the ancient towns, Pliny in one passage (iv. 12. s. 23) mentions only one town, Coos; but in another (v. 31. s. 36) he mentions three, Notium, Nisyrus, Mendeterus. The principal ancient remains are found in the valley above the harbour Linaria on the western side of the island; but Ross found no inscriptions recording the name of the town. The chief ruins are those of a great church tou Christou tes Hierousalem, built upon the site of an ancient temple of Apollo, of which, there are still remains. Stephanus (s. v. Kaludna) speaks of Apollo Calydneus. South of the town there is a plain still called Argos, as in the island of Casus. (Ross, Reisen auf den Griechischen, Inseln, vol. ii. p. 92, seq., vol. iii. p. 139.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Cinara

KINAROS (Island) LEROS
  Cinara or Cinarus (Kinaros: Zinari), a small island in the Aegaean sea, NE. of Amorgos, named after the artichoke (kinara) which it produced. (Plin. iv. 12. s. 22; Mel. ii. 7; Athen. ii. p. 70; Colum. x. 235.)

Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  Leros (Leros: Eth. Lerios: Leros), a small island of the Aegean, and belonging to the scattered islands called Sporades. It is situated opposite the Sinus Iassius, on the north of Calymna, and on the south of Lepsia, at a distance of 320 stadia from Cos and 350 from Myndus. (Stadiasm. Mar. Magni, § § 246, 250, 252.) According to a statement of Anaximenes of Lampsacus, Leros was,like Icaros, colonised by Milesians. (Strab. xiv. p. 635.) This was probably done in consequence of a suggestion of Hecataeus; for on the breaking out of the revolt of the Ionians against Persia, he advised his countrymen to erect a fortress in the island, and make it the centre of their operations, if they should be driven from Miletus. (Herod. v. 125; comp. Thucyd. viii. 27.) Before its occupation by the Milesians, it was probably inhabited by Dorians. The inhabitants of Leros were notorious in antiquity for their ill nature, whence Phocylides sang of them: -
Lerioi kakoi, ouch ho men, hus d'ou,
Pantes, plen Prokleous: kai Proklees Lerios.

(Strab. x. p. 487, &c.) The town of Leros was situated on the west of the modern town, on the south side of the bay, and on the slope of a hill; in this locality, at least, distinct traces of a town have been discovered by Ross. (Reisen auf d. Griech. Inseln, ii. p. 119.) The plan of Hecataeus to fortify Leros does not seem to have been carried into effect. Leros never was an independent community, but was governed by Miletus, as we must infer from inscriptions, which also show that Milesians continued to inhabit the island as late as the time of the Romans. Leros contained a sanctuary of Artemis Parthenos, in which, according to mythology, the sisters of Meleager were transformed into guinea fowls (meleagrides; Anton. Lib. 2; comp. Ov. Met. viii. 533, &c.), whence these birds were always kept in the sanctuary of the goddess. (Athen. xiv. p. 655.) In a valley, about ten minutes' walk from the sea, a small convent still bears the name of Partheni, and at a little distance from it there are the ruins of an ancient Christian church, evidently built upon some ancient foundation, which seems to have been that of the temple of Artemis Parthenos. This small island, says Ross, though envied on account of its fertility, its smiling valleys, and its excellent harbours, is nevertheless scorned by its neighbours, who charge its inhabitants with niggardliness (l. c. p. 122; comp. Bockh, Corp. Inscript. n. 2263; Ross, Inscript. ined. ii 188.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  Patmos (Patmos: Patmo), one of the Sporades Insulae, in the south-east of the Aegean, to the west of Lepsia and south of Samos, is said to have been 30 Roman miles in circumference. (Pliny, iv. 23; Strab. x. p. 488; Thucyd. iii. 23; Eustath. ad Dion. Per. 530.) On the north-eastern side of the island there was a town with a harbour of the same name as the island, and the southernmost point formed the promontory Amazonium (Stadiasm. Mar. Mag. p. 488, ed. Hoffmann). This little island is celebrated as the place to which St. John was banished towards the close of the reign of Domitian, and where he is said to have composed the Apocalypse (Revel. i. 9). A cave is still shown in Patmos where the apostle is believed to have received his revelations. (Comp. Iren. ii. 22; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. iii. 18; Dion Cass. lviii. 1.) The island contains several churches and convents, and a few remains of the ancient town and its castle. (Walpole, Turkey, tom. ii. p. 43; Ross, Reisen auf den Griech. Inseln, vol. ii. p. 123, foll.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

Pharmacusa

FARMAKONISSI (Small island) LEROS
(Pharmakousa). An island off the coast of Miletus, where Iulius Caesar was taken prisoner by pirates. Here, too, King Attalus died.

Cinara

KINAROS (Island) LEROS
A small island in the Aegean Sea, east of Naxos, celebrated for its artichokes (kinarai).

Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
A small island, one of the Sporades, opposite to the mouth of the Sinus Iassius, on the coast of Caria ( Herod.v. 125). Here the sisters of Meleager were said to have been transformed into guinea-pigs (meleagrides).

Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
One of the islands called Sporades, in the Icarian Sea, celebrated as the place to which the Apostle John was banished, and in which he wrote the Apocalypse.

Individuals' pages

Local government Web-Sites

Municipality of Astypalea

ASTYPALEA (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Municipality of Kalymnos

KALYMNOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Local government WebPages

Astipalea

ASTYPALEA (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Municipality of Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Maps

Non-profit organizations WebPages

AGIA MARINA (Small town) LEROS

ALINDA (Village) LEROS

BLEFOUTIS (Settlement) LEROS

GOURNA (Village) LEROS

KALYMNOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  The terrain of this fourth largest of the Dodecanese is mountainous, except for two fertile valleys. It is along these valleys that its biggest villages have sprouted Kalimnos or Pothia and Vathi.
  Castles, remnants of fortresses, ar chaeological finds, and old churches bear witness to the continuous importance of Kalimnos in the history of the Aegean. Its natural attractions - caves, lovely beaches. unspoilt scenery - make it a mini earthly paradise Kalimnos is widely known as the spongefishers' island, since such a large portion of the population is engaged in this age - old occupation. Once the island's capital was located at Horio, which benefited from the protection offered by the castle of the Knights of St. John just above it. Today's capital is Pothia or Kalimnos, founded around 1850 by the inhabitants of Horio. Its brightly coloured houses surround the port like the seats in an amphitheatre, arranged along the hillsides down to the caiques and fishing boats bobbing below. An old church dedicated to Christ the Saviour adorns the waterfront It is decorated with frescoes and valuable icons, while its Iconostasis is the work of the well known sculptor, Yiannoulis Halepas. Kalimnos has other charming villages, like Vathi, set in a fertile valley full of citrus tress, and Metohi, on the southeast side of the island. The quiet hamlet of Emborios lies to the north.
  To the west are Massouri, Mirties, Kamari and Panormos where one can try sea-food delicacies such as "fouskes" and "chtapokeftedes". On the road to Panormos, you will notice the remains of a three - aisled basilica dedicated to Christ of Jerusalem, which was erected around the 6th century on the site of an ancient temple where Delian Apollo was worshipped. To the north of the main town is Pera Kastro, also called the Castle of the Golden Hands (Hrissoheria) , because the chapel in its interior has an icon of the Virgin whose hands are covered with gold leaf Northeast of Pothia. at the foot of Flaska hill, is the cave of the Seven Virgins or Nymphs (not to be visited). Kalimnos boasts two other caves, the richly decorated Skalies, about 100 metres from the village of Skalia in the north of the island (not to be visited), and Kefalas or Trypas. Kefalas to the south (which can be visited and one can approach it by boat). At Therma, only one kilometre or so from Pothia. there are radioactive springs and therapeutic bathing installations, rooms where visitors may spend the night, and specially trained personnel to assist them. Among the lovely beaches on Kalimnos are Massouri, Mirties and Arginondas along the west coast and Vlyhadia in the south.

KRITHONI (Settlement) LEROS

LEROS (Port) DODEKANISSOS

PANAGIES (Beach) LEROS

PARTHENI (Village) LEROS

PLATANOS (City quarter) LEROS

XIROKAMBOS (Village) LEROS

Non commercial Web-Sites

Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Perseus Project

KALYMNOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
Calymnus, Calymnos, Kalymnos, Calymna, Kalymna, Calymnae, Calydnae, Calydnos, Calyndian, Calyndians, Calymnian, Calymnians

Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS

Remarkable selections

The natural setting of Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  The largest part of the island is relatively flat with plains reaching down to the sea and low mountains (the highest point being Kleidi, 320 m.). That is also why it took its name from the ancient Greek word "leros" which means smooth, flat. Dense vegetation covers a large part of the island. The landscape is made even more beautiful by plains forested with pine, eucalyptus, oak and olive trees. It is a landscape that is constantly changing. The sea cutting sharply into it has formed at many points deep, protected harbors and large bays. The gulf of Partheni is in the northern part of Leros; the islet of Archangelos lies at its entrance, protecting it from the winds. At the southern tip of the island is the long and narrow bay of Xerokambos; Kalymnos stands opposite and the Glaronisia ("Gull islands") are before it.
  The island has two large harbors, Lakki to the southeast, one of the largest natural harbors in the Mediterranean, and Ayia Marina to the northeast. There are many small picturesque islands surrounding it on all sides: Ayia Kyriaki, Peganousa, Farmakonissi, Strongyli, Trypiti. Most of these are good fishing spots and the depths of the sea are of incomparable beauty, enchanting to divers. Leros has quite a number of small springs.
  The best known are Paliaskloupis, Kalikaris, Sykidia and Panayies. The island has a mild and pleasant climate without great fluctuations. The incredible variety of flowers that ornament courtyards, doors and windows bear witness to that. The average summer temperature is between 20°-26° C while in winter it dips to 12°-17° C. Thus, Leros is an ideal place for holidays, no matter the season.
This text (extract) is cited March 2004 from the Municipality of Leros tourist pamphlet.

The Catholic Encyclopedia

Leros

  Titular see of the Cyclades, suffragan of Rhodes. According to Strabo, this island must have been a colony of Miletus; it next became independent before falling under the Roman domination.
  According to the poet Phocylides, the inhabitants of Leros had, without exception, an evil reputation. It was here that Aristagoras, the leader of the Tonian revolt against the Persians (499 B.C.), was advised to hide from the vengeance of Darius.
  The island possessed a famous sanctuary of Artemis the Virgin, on the site of which the present convent of Parthenia and the adjoining church are supposed to be built. A possession of the Knights of Rhodes, the island sustained a siege in 1505, and was taken by the Turks in 1523; it was recovered by the Venetians, who razed its fortifications, in 1648; and it once more fell into the possession of the Osmanli.
  The island is about nine and a quarter miles long by seven and a half wide. It is barren, mountainous, and rich only in marble quarries.

S. Vailhi, ed.
Transcribed by: Mario Anello
This extract is cited June 2003 from The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent online edition URL below.


Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  A small volcanic island in the Aegean Sea, off the coast of Asia Minor, to the south of Samos and west of Miletus, in lat. 37° 20' N. and long. 26° 35' E. Its length is about ten miles, its breadth six miles, and its coast line thirty seven miles. The highest point is Hagios Elias (Mt. St. Elias) rising to over 1050 feet.
  The island was formerly covered with luxuriant palm groves, which won it the name of Palmosa; of these groves there remains but a clump in the valley called “The Saint's Garden”. The ancient capital occupied the northern (Ruvali) isthmus.
  The modern town of Patmos lies in the middle part of the island. Above it towers the battlements of St. John's Monastery, founded in 1088 by St. Christobulus. The Island of Patmos is famous in history as the place of St. John's exile; there according to general belief the Beloved Disciple wrote the Apocalypse, the imagery of which was in part inspired by the scenery of the island. The spot where St. John was favoured with his revelations is pointed out as a cave on the slope of the hill, half way between the shore and the modern town of Patmos.

Charles L. Souvay, ed.
Transcribed by: Mary Thomas
This extract is cited June 2003 from The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent online edition URL below.


The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

Astypalaia

ASTYPALEA (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  Astypalaia. Island lying between Anaphe and Kos, which was named after the ancient town and capital. The modern capital now occupies the site of the ancient city, as is testified by many ruins, inscriptions, and coins found there. The mole, which protects the port from the N, was built evidently during the Roman Imperial period.
  The island was inhabited first by the Carians, later by Minoans (Ov. Met. 7.456-62), and then, during the historical period, by Megarians and Dorians from the Argolis. It became a member (454-424 B.C.) of the Delian-Athenian Confederacy. As has been attested, especially from Hellenistic inscriptions, the city must have played an important role in the Aegean, owing to the seafaring ability of its inhabitants and the fertility of the soil. The town was governed by the boule, the demos, and gerousia.
  There were a prytaneion, an agora, a theater, and the Sanctuaries of Athena and Asklepios, Apollo, and Artemis. Small Hellenistic coins represent Perseus, Gorgo, and later Dionysos, Athena, and Asklepios.
  During the Roman period, Astypalaia became civitas foederata, while in the Imperial period it was autonomous.

G. S. Korres, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Kalymnos

KALYMNOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  An island situated to the N of Kos. Kalymnos was settled by Dorians. Together with the adjacent islands it appears in the Catalogue of Ships of the Iliad (2.676-77). After the Persian Wars it became an Athenian ally. Before the end of the 3d c. B.C. it was annexed to Kos, to constitute a deme. Numerous ancient sites testify to its importance in antiquity. The main centers of occupation in Classical times seem to have flourished at Vathy. At Embolas, to the N of the valley of Vathy, is preserved a circuit wall belonging to a town. A Hellenistic tower known as Phylakai is to the SE. The crag of Kastellas is protected by a Hellenistic (?) rubble wall. At Pothaia to the S a sanctuary may have existed. An Ionic Temple of Apollo has been investigated at Christos tes Jerousalem. The cult goes back to the archaic period. A cemetery with chamber tombs has been located at Damos. Sykia, on the W side of the island, has limestone quarries. On the N, in the area between Emporion and Argeinonta, various remains have been reported, such as pottery, coins, and tombs.

D. Schilardi, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Oct 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Leros

LEROS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  One of the Sporades, lying between Patmos and Kalymnos, ca. 40 km from the Anatolian coast (Caria). The island was inhabited in prehistoric times and again at least from the 7th c. B.C. A close, though not exactly definable, political relationship with Miletos is attested epigraphically and by statements of Herodotos (5.125) and Thucydides (8.26-27) from at least the early 5th c. to Roman times. It has been suggested that Leros was a deme of Miletos in Hellenistic times, a cleruchy earlier. Habitation of the island apparently continued uninterrupted into Byzantine times.
  There have been no systematic excavations. The principal ancient town may have been located on the site of the modern Ayia Marina, where remains of a few unidentified Classical structures are visible. However, the places where various inscriptions have been found suggest that the administrative center was Parthenion in the N part of the island. The temple of Parthenos (Artemis) mentioned by Athenaeus (Deipnosophists (14.655,b,c) and in inscriptions has not been located, but is presumed to have been in the locality now known as Partheni (Metochion). At the S end of the island, on top of the hill of Xerokampos, are the remains of a wall probably built in the late 4th c. B.C., usually thought to be part of a tower. This, and a similar tower at Partheni, may link Leros to the precautions taken by Miletos on its peripheral islands, in order to control the sea in Hellenistic times. Architectural fragments of Classical date are built into later structures, especially churches, in various parts of the island (Smalu and Lakki), implying widespread habitation in Classical times. Inscriptions and some ancient objects are in the Archaeological HaIl in the Library at Platanos.

J. L. Benson, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Patmos

PATMOS (Island) DODEKANISSOS
  An island located to the S of Samos. Very few ancient authors mention the island: Thucydides (3.33.3), Strabo (10.5. 13, C488), Eust. (Comm. ad. Dionys. Perieg. 530), an anonymous author (Stadiasmus Mans Magni, 283-GGM, I 498) and Pliny (HN 4.70). Patmos was poorly inhabited in antiquity. The early inhabitants were Dorians. Ionian settlers came later. Political exiles were deported there during the Roman period. On the coastal area, N of the isthmus Stavros, are the foundations of the supposed Temple of Aphrodite. Artemis was worshiped in the place where the Cloister of St. John now stands. The center of ancient Patmos is situated E of the modern harbor of Skala, occupying a narrow isthmus. The acropolis (Kastelli) preserves sections of a fortification wall and three towers, belonging probably to the 3d c. B.C. and built in isodomic style. An ancient necropolis has been located in the vicinity of Kastelli, around Nettia. Tombs have been also reported at Kambos in the N part of the island.

D. Schilardi, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains 1 image(s), bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Telendos

TELENDOS (Island) KALYMNOS
  A small island located to the W of Kalymnos. The narrow strait between the two islands must have served as anchorage in ancient times. A tentative theory suggests that the deme-center of Panormos, a deme of Kalymnos, lay on Telendos, but we lack evidence. Ruins of a Hellenic fort have been observed in the N part of the island. On the E side there is a badly preserved rock-cut theater. Other ruins of Roman and later times are evident throughout Telendos.

D. Sshilardi, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


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