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The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

Kreusa

  In antiquity, the market town for Thespiae. The site is on the N slope of Mt. Korombili, near the modern town of Livadhostro. The harbor, protected from the violent local storms by a mole in ancient times, had no importance of its own in the Classical period, but served as a port for Thebes, and maintained close relations with Corinth. During the war against Antiochos, the Romans used the town as a base of operations. Pausanias saw nothing there worth reporting; the site is now marked by the remains of walls with towers, and a gate 3 m wide. A bronze statue known as the Livadhostro Poseidon, now in the National Museum, was found in the sea off nearby Haghios Vasilios at the end of the 19th c.

M. H. Mc Allister, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


Perseus Project index

Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Creusa

  Kreousa, Kreousia, Creusa, Kreusis, Eth. Kreusios. A town of Boeotia, at the head of a small bay in the Corinthian gulf, described by ancient writers as the port of Thespiae. (Strab. ix.; Paus. ix. 32. § 1; Creusa, Thespiensium emporium, in intimo sinu Corinthiaco retractum, Liv. xxxvi. 21.) The navigation from Peloponnesus to Creusis is described by Pausanias as insecure, on account of the many headlands which it was necessary to double, and of the violent gusts of wind rushing down from the mountains. Creusis was on the borders of Megaris. One of the highest points of Mt. Cithaeron projects into the sea between Creusis and Aegosthenae, the frontier town in Megaris, leaving no passage along the shore except a narrow path on the side of the mountain. In confirmation of Pausanias, Leake remarks that this termination of Mt. Cithaeron, as well as all the adjoining part of the Alcyonic sea, is subject to sudden gusts of wind, by which the passage of such a cornice is sometimes rendered dangerous. On two occasions the Lacedaemonians retreated from Boeotia by this route, in order to avoid the more direct roads across Mt. Cithaeron. On the first of these occasions, in B.C. 378, the Lacedaemonian army under Cleombrotus was overtaken by such a violent storm, that the shields of the soldiers were wrested from their hands by the wind, and many of the beasts of burden were blown over the precipices. (Xen. Hell. v. 4. 16, seq.) The second time that they took this route was after the fatal battle of Leuctra, in B.C. 371. (Xen. Hell. vi. 4 § 25, seq.) The exact site of Creusis is uncertain, but there can be no doubt that it must be placed with Leake somewhere in the bay of Livadhostra.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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