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Listed 9 sub titles with search on: Information about the place for wider area of: "PYRGOS Municipality ILIA" .


Information about the place (9)

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PYRGOS (Town) ILIA

Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

DYSPONTION (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Dyspontium

Duspontion: Eth. Duspontieus. An ancient town, in the territory of Pisa, said to have been founded by a son of Oenomaus, is described by Strabo as situated in the plain on the road from Elis to Olympia. It lay north of the Alpheius, not far from the sea, and probably near the modern Skaphidi. Being destroyed by the Eleians in their war with the Pisatae, its inhabitants removed to Apollonia and Epidamnus.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


FIAS (Ancient city) ILIA

Pheia

  Phea (hai Pheiai, Hornm. Il. vii. 135, Od. xv. 297; Pheia, Thuc. Strab; Phea, Steph. B. s. v.: Eth. Pheates, Steph. B.). A city of Elis in the Pisatis, situated upon the isthmus connecting the promontory Ichthys (C. of Katakolo) with the mainland. Strabo erroneously speaks of two promontories upon this part of the coast; one called Pheia, from the name of the neighbouring town, and another more to the south, of which he has not given the name. (Strab. viii. 343.) Pheia is mentioned by Homer, who places it near the Iardanus, which is apparently the mountain torrent north of Ichthys, and which flows into the sea on the northern side of the lofty mountain Skaphidi. (Hom. l. c.) Upon a very conspicuous peaked height upon the isthmus of Ichthys are the ruins of a castle of the middle ages, called Pontikokastro, built upon the remains of the Hellenic walls of Pheia. On either side of Ichthys are two harbours; the northern one, which is a small creek, was the port of Pheia; the southern one is the broad bay of Katakolo, which is now much frequented, but was too open and exposed for ancient navigation. The position of these harbours explains the narrative of Thucydides, who relates that in the first year of the Peloponnesian War (B.C. 431), the Athenian fleet, having sailed from Methone in Messenia, landed at Pheia (that is, in the bay of Katakolo), and laid waste the country; but a storm having arisen, they sailed round the promontory Ichthys into the harbour of Pheia. In front of the harbour was a small island, which Polybius calls Pheias (Strab. l. c.; Polyb. iv. 9). About a mile north of the small creek at Pontikokastro, there is a harbour called Khortus, which Leake is disposed to identify with the port mentioned by Thucydides, on the ground that the historian describes it not as the port of Pheia, but as a harbour in the district Pheia (ton en te Phgeiai limena but we think it more probable that the historian intended the creek at the foot of Pontikokastro. In any case Pheia stood on the isthmus of Ichthys, and neither at Khortus nor at the mouth of the torrent of Skaphidi, at one or other of which spots Pheia is placed by Boblaye, though at neither are there any ancient remains.think it more probable that the historian intended the creek at the foot of Pontikokastro. In any case Pheia stood on the isthmus of Ichthys, and neither at Khortus nor at the mouth of the torrent of Skaphidi, at one or other of which spots Pheia is placed by Boblaye, though at neither are there any ancient remains.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited May 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


LETRINI (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Letrini

  Letrinoi, Letrina. A town of Pisatis in Elis, situated near the sea, upon the Sacred Way leading from Elis to Olympia, at the distance of 180 stadia from Elis, and 120 from Olympia. It was said to have been founded by Letreus, a son of Pelops. (Paus. vi. 22. § 8.) Together with several of the other dependent townships of Elis, it joined Agis, when he invaded the territories of Elis; and the Eleians were obliged to surrender their supremacy over Letrini by the peace which they concluded with the Spartans in B.C. 400. (Xen. Hell. iii. 2. 25, 30.) Xenophon speaks of Letrini, Amphidoli, and Marganeis as Triphylian places, although they were on the right bank of the Alpheius; and if there is no corruption in the text, which Mr. Grote thinks there is , the word Triphylian must be used in a loose sense to signify the dependent townships of Elis. The Letrinaiai guai are mentioned by Lycophron (158). In the time of Pausanias nothing remained of Letrini except a few houses and a temple of Artemis Alpheiaea. Letrini may be placed at the village and monastery of St. John, between Pyrgo and the port of Katakolo, where, according to Leake, among many fragments of antiquity, a part of a large statue was found some years ago. g remained of Letrini except a few houses and a temple of Artemis Alpheiaea. Letrini may be placed at the village and monastery of St. John, between Pyrgo and the port of Katakolo, where, according to Leake, among many fragments of antiquity, a part of a large statue was found some years ago.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited June 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Local government Web-Sites

PYRGOS (Municipality) ILIA

Municipality of Pyrgos


Official Web-Sites

KATAKOLO (Village) ILIA

Katakolo

  A coastal large village, in the area of ancient Fias, whose citadel was the base of the today's castle. It is Pyrgos’ haven, 13,5 km W. The inhabitants are 612.
Sights
  In the northwest of Katakolo, on St Andrew’s bay, there is a devastated castle, Ponticokastro. It used to be a powerful fort of Vilardouini. The castle is built at the site of the citadel of ancient Fias. Fias was Ilida 's haven whose remnants are found deep in the sea after the powerful earthquake of the 6th century.
  The Castle was constructed in the Byzantine period and was modified by the Francs (13th century), who called it Bo Vouar or Bel Vedere. It was repeatedly destroyed, mainly during the Turkish domination.

This text is cited December 2004 from the West Greece Region General Secretariat URL below, which contains image.


PYRGOS (Town) ILIA

Pyrgos

  Pirgos is the capital of the prefecture of Ilia. The town owes its name to the presence of a tall tower (pyrgos) erected by loannis Tsernotas (1512-20).
  It was known by this name as early as 1687.
  Its chief landmarks are the two exquisite neoclassical buildings designed by Schiller, the Municipal Market and the Apollo Municipal Theater.
  In the evenings the residents of this little town congregate in the flagstone paved main square lined by cafes and pastry shops. In the narrow alleyways, small tavernas and grills serve up local delicacies, savory tidbits from Ilia's fertile soil.
  In 1995 the "Olympia Film Festival" started for children and young people and it takes place every year with great success.
History
  The history of the town is the "history of the raisins: itself. "The raisin issue" was an important one for the area in the first three decades of the country.
  The port in Katakolo has played an important role in the economic development of the town. Other factors that contributed to that development were the construction of the railway that connected Pyrgos with Katakolo, the extensive cultivation of vineyards and the workers that moved to Pyrgos from Gortinia, Zakynthos and Cephalonia.
  The economic development had a positive effect in the town itself. The town hall, the neoclassical market by Chiller, the Apollo theatre and some neoclassical houses were built around that time.
  What also contributed to the cultural development of the town were the newspapers "Patris" (the oldest one in Greece!) and "Avgi", the magazine "Odysseus" that presented in its pages the famous poets Elytis, Seferis and Kavafis under the supervision of the poet Takis Sinopoulos, the broadcasting station and the Public Library.
  In the last decades the charity organizations "Agia Filothei" and "Vasiliada" were set up, the "Latsio Dimotiko Megaro" was built and the "Apollo" theatre was restored.

This text is cited December 2004 from the West Greece Region General Secretariat URL below, which contains image.


Perseus Project

DYSPONTION (Ancient city) PYRGOS

Dyspontium


Present location

FIAS (Ancient city) ILIA

Pontikokastro


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