Information about the place GRAMVOUSSA (Village) KISSAMOS - GTP + Greek Travel Pages

Location information

Listed 8 sub titles with search on: Information about the place  for wider area of: "GRAMVOUSSA Village KISSAMOS" .


Information about the place (8)

Commercial WebPages

Agria Gramvousa Island

AGRIA GRAMVOUSSA (Island) CHANIA
  Imeri Gramvousa contains the remains of a Venetian castle (1579). The castle, although built for 3,000 men, was never involved in a major battle. The Venetians handed it over to the Turks in 1692 -- 23 years after Iraklion fell.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Imeri Gramvoussa

IMERI GRAMVOUSSA (Island) CHANIA
  Imeri Gramvousa contains the remains of a Venetian castle (1579). The castle, although built for 3,000 men, was never involved in a major battle. The Venetians handed it over to the Turks in 1692 -- 23 years after Iraklion fell.

This text is cited Oct 2002 from the Crete TOURnet URL below, which contains images.


Gramvoussa

  On the NW coast of Crete the west coast of the gulf of Kissamos projects northwards and forms a promontory that the ancients named Korykos Akran.
  West of this tongue of land are two small rocky islets. The one north of the promontory is Agriogramvoussa, south of it and to the west is Gramvoussa itself.
  Due to its strategic location, Gramvoussa was fortified by the Venetians, who built a well-fortified castle on the top of a steepy rock at an altitude of 137 m. Construction on the castle of Gramvoussa started in 1579 and ended in 1582. It was destroyed in 1588, however, when thunder struck on the powder store.The castle was rebuilt in 1630.
  It was one of the three castles to remain under Venetian dominion after the Turkish occupation of Crete (the other two were those of Sitia and Spinalonga).
  Even though the castle was impregnable, during the Venetian-Turkish war the Italian commandant was bribed by the Turks and he gave over the castle in 1692.
  During the Greek uprising against the Turks, Gramvoussa played an important and desicive role. After many attempts the castle was finally occupied by the Cretan revolutionaries in 1825, when a team of Cretans disguised as Turks entered the castle. Gramvoussa was the first part of Crete to be liberated by the Turks.
  The rocky island became a shelter for over 3000 people, and a base of operations for the revolution teams. But it also became a base of pirates that plundered every ship that passed to the seas around the island, so with the agreement of the Greek Government a English-French garrison took over the island of Gramvoussa in 1828. Today, the high walls of the Gramvoussa are preserved, half ruined but awesome.
  Opposite the island of Gramvoussa is the wonderful beach of Balos.

This text is cited September 2004 from the Interkriti URL below, which contains images.


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

Elaea

ELEA (Ancient city) CHANIA
  Elaea (Elaia, Ptol. v. 14. § 3), a promontory on the NE. coast of Crete, which Pococke (Trav. vol. ii. p. 218) calls Chaule-burnau. (Comp. Engel, Kypros, vol. i. p. 89.)

Corycus

KORYKOS (Ancient location) CHANIA
  Corycus (Korukos, Ptol. iii. 17. § 2: Grabusa), the NW. promontory of Crete. In Strabo the name appears as Cimarus (Kimaros, x. p. 474). Elsewhere Strabo (xvii. p. 838) states that Corycus was the point whence the distances to the several ports of Peloponnesus were measured: as Grabusa ends in two projecting points, it is probable that the W. point was called Cimaros, the E. Corycus. We learn from Pliny (iv. 20) that the islands which lie off this promontory were called Corycae, and that part of the mass of rock which forms this point went by the name of Mount Coryous. Ptolemy mentions a city of this name, and there is a passage in which Juvenal (xiv. 267) mentions a Corycian vessel which evidently belonged to this Cretan town. When the Florentine traveller Buondelmonte visited the island in A.D. 1415, he found remains existing. (Cornelius, Creta Sacra, vol. i. p. 87; Pashley, Trav. vol. ii. p. 74; Hoeck, Kreta, vol. i. p. 377.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Present location

It is located on the cape to the SW of the Balos beach.

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