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Location information

Listed 39 sub titles with search on: Information about the place for wider area of: "ATHENS, EAST DISTRICT Prefectural district ATTIKI" .


Information about the place (39)

Boundaries

FLYA (Ancient demos) CHALANDRI

Phlya

The ancient deme of Phlya extended to the modern municipalities of Chalandri, Agia Paraskevi, Glyka Nera and Paiania.


Commercial WebSites - Notable

AGIA PARASKEVI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Commercial WebSites

CHOLARGOS (Suburb of Athens) ATTIKI


KIFISSIA (Municipality) ATTIKI

General

EPIKIFISSIA (Ancient demos) ATTIKI

Epicephesia

The ancient deme is located beyond Cephisus river, to the northwest of Athens.


PERGASSES (Ancient demos) KIFISSIA

Pergassai, Pergasse

Aristophanes (Hippeis 321) gives us the information that Pergasse was on the road from the city of Athens to Aphidna. This combined with some inscriptions led the researchers to locate Pergasse to the West or North of Cephissia.


Greek & Roman Geography (ed. William Smith)

ATHMONON (Ancient demos) ATTIKI

Athmonun

Athmonun (Athmonon, also Athmonia, Harpocrat.; Steph. B.; Zonar.; Suid.), situated on the site of the village Marusi, which is a mile and a half from Kifisia on the road to Athens. The name of the modern village has been derived from Amarysia, a surname of Artemis, who was worshipped under this designation at Athmonum (Paus. i. 35.5). An inscription found near Marusi, in which the temenos of this goddess is mentioned, puts the matter beyond dispute. (horos Artemidos temenous Amarudias, Bockh, Inscr. n. 528.) Athmonum also possessed a very ancient temple of Aphrodite Urania (Pans. i. 14.7). The inhabitants of this demus appear to have been considered clever wine-dressers. (Aristoph. Pac. 190.)

This extract is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


IFESTIADES (Ancient demos) HERAKLIO

Hephaestiadae

Iphistiadae or Hephaestiadae (Iphistiadai, Hephaistiadai, Steph. B.; Hesych.), are the names of one demus, and not two separate demi, as Leake maintained. Iphistiadae appears to have been the correct form of the name, not only because it occurs much more frequently in inscriptions, but also because it is much more probable that a name formed from the obscure hero Iphistius should have been converted into one derived from the god Hephaestus, than that the reverse should have been the case. (Ross, p. 74.) We learn from Plato's will (Diog. Laert. iii. 41), that this demus contained an Heracleium or temple of Hercules, which has probably given its name to the modern village of Arakli, about two or three miles westward of Kivisia and Marusi. Hence Arakli indicates the site of Iphistiadae, as Marusi does that of Athmonum.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


IRESSIDE (Ancient demos) ATTIKI

Eiresidae

Eiresidae (Eiresidai, Steph. B.; Bekker, Anecd. i. p. 246), west or south-west of Cephisia, and adjacent to Iphistiadae. (Diog. Laert. iii. 41.)


KIFISSIA (Ancient demos) KIFISSIA

Cephisia

Cephisia (Kephisia), was one of the ancient twelve cities of Cecrops, and continued to be an important demus down to the latest times. It retains its ancient name (Kivisia), and is situated about nine miles NE. of Athens, at the foot of Mt. Pentelicus, nearly opposite Acharnae. It was the favourite summer residence of Herodes Atticus, who adorned it with buildings, gardens, and statues. We learn from modern travellers that a fountain of transparent water, and groups of shady trees, still remain here; and that it continues to be a favourite residence of the Athenians during the heat of summer. (Strab. ix. 397; Diog. Laert. iii. 41; Philostr. Vit. Soph. ii. 1. ยง 12; Gell. i. 2, xviii. 10; Harpocrat.; Phot.; Wordsworth, p. 227; Stephani, Reise durch Griechenland, p. 1.)

This extract is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


PENTELI (Ancient demos) PENTELI

Pentele

Pentele (Pentele, Steph.), was situated at the north-eastern extremity of the Athenian plain, at the marble quarries of Mt. Brilessus, which was called Mt. Pentelicus from this place. [See p. 322, a.] The fact of Pentele being a demus rests upon the authority of Stephanus alone, and has not yet been confirmed by inscriptions.


Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities

EPIKIFISSIA (Ancient demos) ATTIKI

Epicephesia

(Epikephesia). A deme of Attica belonging to the tribe Oeneis.


IFESTIADES (Ancient demos) HERAKLIO

Hephaestia

A deme of Attica belonging to the tribe Acamantis.


KIFISSIA (Ancient demos) KIFISSIA

Cephisia

A deme of Attica, at the foot of Mount Brilessus, and near the source of the Cephissus. It was the favourite residence of Herodes Atticus, who had a beautiful villa here.


PENTELI (Mountain) ATTIKI

Pentelicus

A mountain in Attica, celebrated for its marble; a branch of Mount Parnes, from which it runs in a southeasterly direction between Athens and Marathon to the coast. It was also called Brilessus


Local government Web-Sites

AGIA PARASKEVI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Agia Paraskevi


AMAROUSSION (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Amaroussion


CHALANDRI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Chalandri


CHOLARGOS (Municipality) ATTIKI

EKALI (Community) ATTIKI

Community of Ekali


FILOTHEI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Filothei


HERAKLIO (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Heraklion


LYKOVRYSSI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Lykovryssi


MELISSIA (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Melissia


NEA ERYTHREA (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Nea Erythrea


NEA IONIA (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Nea Ionia


NEO PSYCHIKO (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Neo Psychiko


PAPAGOS (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Papagos


PEFKI (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Pefki


PSYCHIKO (Municipality) ATTIKI

Municipality of Psychiko


Local government WebPages

ILIAKO CHORIO (City quarter) PEFKI

MELISSIA (Suburb of Athens) ATTIKI


PEFKI (Suburb of Athens) ATTIKI


PSYCHIKO (Suburb of Athens) ATTIKI


Maps


Perseus Encyclopedia

PENTELI (Mountain) ATTIKI

Pentelikon (Pentelicus)

Mountain of Attica, image of Athena on, Pentelic quarries, Pentelic marble.


The Princeton Encyclopedia of Classical Sites

FLYA (Ancient demos) CHALANDRI

Chalandri (Phlya)

  Once a village, now part of the almost unbroken urban development from Athens to Kephissia (and beyond), Chalandri lies slightly N of the N limits of both Hymettos and Tourkovouni, midway between them, and 4 km S of Marousi, the ancient deme of Athmonon. Thus it once occupied an important position in the Athenian plain alongside roads leading N to Pendeli and E to the Mesogaia. Many antiquities have been found in this area, for example, graves from Late Classical and Hellenistic times, an archaistic relief of Dionysos, and a Roman tomb of the 2d c. A.D., besides inscriptions and reused architectural blocks. The tomb has its vaulting intact, and, with the addition of an apse, now serves as the Church of the Panagia Marmariotissa.
  Despite the lack of more specific evidence, it seems obvious that Chalandri has inherited the location of an ancient village. Because it is known that the demes of Athmonon and Phlya were in part contiguous (IG II2 2727.48-49), and because all the demes around Marousi have been identified except to the S, scholars agree that Chalandri must therefore be the site of Phlya. As such, it possessed a telesterion restored by Themistokles (Plut. Them. 1.3), had a tradition of mystic rites older than those at Eleusis (Hippol. Haer. 5.20), and was visited by Pausanias (1.34.1), who recorded several other cults.

C.W.J. Eliot, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


KIFISSIA (Ancient demos) KIFISSIA

Kephissia

  One of the original twelve cities that formed the union of Attica under Theseus (Philochoros: FGrHist 328 F 94), Kephissia remained a deme in Classical times, on the site now occupied by the suburb of the same name. Its most famous resident was Herodes Atticus, whose elegant villa is described by Aulus Gellius (NA 1.2.2). Herodes' presence there has been amply documented not only by inscriptions, but also by the discovery in 1961 of his portrait bust and that of his favorite Polydeukion, possibly from the villa itself. These finds came from a lot behind the Church of the Panagia (Xydou). From the same period as Herodes is the long-known Roman tomb on the S side of Plateia Platanou. When found it still contained four sarcophagi. Although nothing of the tomb has survived in place above the level of the orthostate course, it can be convincingly restored with a vaulted roof on the basis of the almost similar tomb at Chalandri. About half a km E of this square, a deme decree of the 4th c. B.C. was recently found, recording the thanks of the citizens of Kephissia towards someone who had repaired their palaistra. This constitutes the only reference to a privately organized palaistra outside of Athens.

C.W.J. Eliot, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Sep 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


PENTELI (Mountain) ATTIKI

Pendeli

  At the NE corner of the Athenian plain, between Parnes and Hymettos, lies the mountain range of Pendeli, more commonly known in antiquity as Brilessos (e.g. Thuc. 2.23.1). It was famous for its fine-grained white marble, which, although at first used sparingly for sculpture in the early 6th c. B.C., later became a major source of material for Athenian buildings, particularly on the Acropolis. According to Pausanias (1.19.6) the quarries were largely exhausted in the 2d c. A.D. by the construction of the Panathenaic Stadium, a fact which modern exploitation has refuted.
  The ancient quarries can still be seen on the mountain's SW face. The most conspicuous, Spilia, with its large cavern behind, has a towering vertical face covered with channelings made by the miners. From here the marble was taken down hill along a steep, well-preserved road, with holes cut in the rock on either side to receive posts for the ropes to control the sleds. A few minutes' climb above Spilia is a small cave that served as a sanctuary of the nymphs. Among the finds were two excellent reliefs of the nymphs with Pan and Hermes from the 4th c. B.C. On the skyline directly above the quarries, 400 m SE of the summit, is a manmade platform suitable for the statue of Athena mentioned by Pausanias (1.32.2).

C.W.J. Eliot, ed.
This text is from: The Princeton encyclopedia of classical sites, Princeton University Press 1976. Cited Nov 2002 from Perseus Project URL below, which contains bibliography & interesting hyperlinks.


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