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Listed 6 sub titles with search on: Religious figures biography for destination: "AGION OROS Mountain CHALKIDIKI".


Religious figures biography (6)

Saints

New Martyr Nicodemos of Mt. Athos


Monks & ascetics

Acindynus Gregorius

Acindynus Gregorius (Gregorios Akinduns), a Greek Monk, A. D. 1341, distinguished in the controversy with the Hesychast or Quietist Monks of Mount Athos. He supported and succeeded Barlaam in his opposition to their notion that the light which appeared on the Mount of the Transfiguration was uncreated. The emperor, John Cantacuzenus, took part (A. D. 1347) with Palamas, the leader of the Quietists, and obtained the condemnation of Acindynus by several councils at Constantinople, at one especially in A. D. 1 351. Remains of Acindynus are, De Essentia et Operatione DEI adversus imperitiam Gregorii Palamae, &c. in " Variorum Pontificum ad Petrum Gnapheum Eutychianum Epistol." p. 77, Gretser. 4to. Ingolst. 1616, and Carmen Iambicum de Haeresibus Palamae, " Graeciae Orthodoxae Scriptores," by Leo. Allatius, p. 755, vol. i. 4to. Rom. 1652.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Sep 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Callistus

Callistus, a monk of mount Athos. During the war between Palaeologus and Cantacuzenus he was sent by the monks to Constantinople to endeavour to restore peace; but he was ill-treated there by the empress Anna and the patriarch Joannes. About the year A. D. 1354, the emperor Cantacuzenus made Callistus patriarch of Constantinople. The year after, when he was requested by the same emperor to crown his son Matthaeus, Callistus refused to comply with the request and withdrew to a monastery. As he refused to perform his duties as patriarch, Philotheus was appointed in his [p. 580] place. But when afterwards Joannes Palacologus had gained possession of the imperial throne, Callistus was restored to the patriarchal see. The year after his restoration he was sent as ambassador to the Servian princess Elizabeth to conclude a peace, and during this embassy he died near Pherne, the capital of the Servians. There is a Greek homily on the exaltation of the cross by one Callistus, which is printed with a Latin translation in Gretser, but whether it is the work of our Callistus, or of another wlo was patriarch of Constantinople in A. D. 1406, is uncertain. There are some other works of a theological nature which are ascribed to one Callistus, but they have never been printed.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Macarius Macres

Macarius Macres or MACRA (ho Makres) or MACRUS (ho Makros), a monk of Mount Athos, and an intimate friend of George Phranza, by whose interest he was appointed Hegumenus, or abbot of the monastery of the Almighty (tou Pantokratoros), at Constantinople. He also obtained the dignity of Protosyncellus. He was a strenuous opponent of the Latin church; and this involved him in serious disputes with Joseph II., patriarch of Constantinople, who was favourable to the union of the churches. Notwithstanding his hostility to the Latins, Macarius was sent by the emperor Joannes II. Palaeologus, on a mission to the Pope Martin V., preparatory to the summoning of a general council to determine the union, and died on his return in the beginning of the year 1431. It is not clear whether Macarius Macres was the same or a different person from another Macarius, a monk of Xanthopulus, of Jewish origin, and spiritual father to the emperor Manuel Palaeologus (Phranza, ii. 1); but it is quite clear that he is to be distinguished from Macarius Curunas (ho Kourounas), who also was sent by Joannes Palaeologus to the pope, after the death of Macarius Macres (Sguropulus, Hist. Concil. Florent. ii. 15,16). Macarius Macres wrote a book against the Latin doctrine of the procession of the Holy Spirit from the Son, with this title, Hoti to legein kai ek tou Psoiu to pneuma to hagion ekporeuesthai oute anankaion estin alla kainotomia tes orthodoxon pisteos, Quod necessarium non est, sed Innovatio Fidei, dicere et Filio procedere Spiritum Sanctum. This work is extant in MS., and is cited by Allatius in his De Eccles. Occident. et Orient. Perpetua Consens. Some other works by Macarius Hieromonachus are extant in MS., but it is not certain if the writer was our Macarius; a small piece, De Inventione et Translatione S. Euplenmii Martyris, is distinctly ascribed to him. (Phrantza, ii. 9, p. 35, ed. Vienna, 1796, pp. 156, 157, ed. Bonn; Sguropulus, l. c.; Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. viii. p. 370; Cave, Hist. Litt. ad ann. 1420.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2006 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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