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Listed 7 sub titles with search on: Religious figures biography for wider area of: "ACHAIA Prefecture GREECE" .


Religious figures biography (7)

Bishops

KALAVRYTA (Small town) ACHAIA

Germanos

The first martyr of the 1821 War of Independence.


PATRA (Town) ACHAIA

Arethas of Caesarea

  Born at Patrae, Greece, about 860; was, like all the eminent men of that time, a disciple of Photius. He became Archbishop of Caesarea early in the tenth century, and is reckoned one of the most scholarly theologians of the Greek Church.
  He is the compiler of the oldest extant Greek commentary (scholia) on the Apocalypse, for which he made considerable use of the similar work of his predecessor, Andrew of Caesarea. To his interest in the earliest Christian literature, caught perhaps from the above-named Andrew, we owe the Arethas Codex, through which the text of the Greek Christian Apologists has, in great measure, reached us. He is also known as a commentator of Plato and Lucian; the famous manuscript of Plato. taken from Patmos to London was copied by order of Arethas. Other important Greek manuscripts, e.g. of Euclides, the rhetor Aristides, and perhaps of Dio Chrysostom, are owing to him.
  The latest known date of his life is 932.

Thomas J. Shahan, ed.
Transcribed by: John Fobian
This extract is cited June 2003 from The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent online edition URL below.


Links

(Following URL information in Greek only)


Patriarchs

KALAVRYTA (Province) ACHAIA

Chryssanthos Notaras, Patriarch of Ierossolyma

, , 1663 - 1731

(Following URL information in Greek only)


Saints

AROANIA (Village) ACHAIA

PATRA (Town) ACHAIA

Saint Andrew

  St. Andrew, the Apostle, son of Jonah, or John, was born in Bethsaida of Galilee. He was brother of Simon Peter. Both were fishermen, and at the beginning of Our Lord's public life occupied the same house at Capharnaum. From the fourth Gospel we learn that Andrew was a disciple of the Baptist, whose testimony first led him and John the Evangelist to follow Jesus. Andrew at once recognized Jesus as the Messias, and hastened to introduce Him to his brother, Peter. Thenceforth the two brothers were disciples of Christ. On a subsequent occasion, prior to the final call to the apostolate, they were called to a closer companionship, and then they left all things to follow Jesus.
  Finally Andrew was chosen to be one of the Twelve; and in the various lists of Apostles given in the New Testament he is always numbered among the first four. Like the majority of the Twelve, Andrew is not named in the Acts except in the list of the Apostles, where the order of the first four is Peter, John, James, Andrew; nor have the Epistles or the Apocalypse any mention of him. As one of the Twelve, Andrew was admitted to the closest familiarity with Our Lord during His public life; he was present at the Last Supper; beheld the risen Lord; witnessed the Ascension; shared in the graces and gifts of the first Pentecost, and helped, amid threats and persecution, to establish the Faith in Palestine.
  When the Apostles went forth to preach to the Nations, Andrew seems to have taken an important part, but unfortunately we have no certainty as to the extent or place of his labours. It is generally agreed that he was crucified by order of the Roman Governor, Aegeas or Aegeates, at Patrae in Achaia, and that he was bound, not nailed, to the cross, in order to prolong his sufferings. The cross on which he suffered is commonly held to have been the decussate cross, now known as St. Andrew's, though the evidence for this view seems to be no older than the fourteenth century. His martyrdom took place during the reign of Nero, on 30 November, A.D. 60); and both the Latin and Greek Churches keep 30 November as his feast.
  St. Andrew's relics were translated from Patrae to Constantinople, and deposited in the church of the Apostles there, about A.D. 357. When Constantinople was taken by the French, in the beginning of the thirteenth century, Cardinal Peter of Capua brought the relics to Italy and placed them in the cathedral of Amalfi, where most of them still remain. St. Andrew is honoured as their chief patron by Russia and Scotland.

J. Macrory, ed.
Transcribed by: Christine J. Murray
This extract is cited June 2003 from The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent online edition URL below.


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