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Listed 25 sub titles with search on: Mythology for destination: "DELOS Island KYKLADES".


Mythology (25)

Historic figures

Asteria

Daughter of Titan and Fivi, sister of Litous. Tranformed into quail to avoid Zeus and falling into sea made the island.


Asteria, a daughter of the Titan Coeus and the Titanid Phoebe, sister of Leto, and mother of Hecate by Perses, son of the Titan Crius. She is said to have turned into a quail (ortux) and plunged into the sea to escape the advances of Zeus. After her the island of Delos was first called Asteria, and later Ortygia.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Asteria, a daughter of the Titan Coeus (according to Hygin. Fab. Pref. of Polus) and Phoebe. She was the sister of Leto, and, according to Hesiod (Theog. 409), the wife of Perses, by whom she became the mother of Hecate. Cicero (de Nat. Deor. iii. 16) makes her the mother of the fourth Heracles by Zeus. But according to the genuine and more general tradition, she was an inhabitant of Olympus, and beloved by Zeus. In order to escape from his embraces, she got metamorphosed into a quail (ortux), threw herself into the sea, and was here metamorphosed into the island Asteria (the island which had fallen from heaven like a star), or Ortygia, afterwards called Delos (Apollod. i. 2.2, 4.1; Athen. ix.; Hygin. Fab. 53; Callimach. Hymn. in Del. 37; Serv. ad Aen. iii. 73). There are several other mythical personages of this name: one a daughter of Alcyoneus; a second, one of the Danaids (Apollod. ii. 1.5); a third, a daughter of Atlas (Hygin. Fab. 250, where, perhaps, Asterope is to be read); and a fourth, a daughter of Hydis, who became by Bellerophontes the mother of Hydissus, the founder of Hydissus in Caria (Steph. Byz. s. v. Hgdissos).

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Gods & demigods

Orion

And Artemis slew Orion in Delos.They say that he was of gigantic stature and born of the earth; but Pherecydes says that he was a son of Poseidon and Euryale. Poseidon bestowed on him the power of striding across the sea. He first married Side, whom Hera cast into Hades because she rivalled herself in beauty. Afterwards he went to Chios and wooed Merope, daughter of Oenopion. But Oenopion made him drunk, put out his eyes as he slept, and cast him on the beach. But he went to the smithy of Hephaestus, and snatching up a lad set him on his shoulders and bade him lead him to the sunrise. Being come thither he was healed by the sun's rays, and having recovered his sight he hastened with all speed against Oenopion.
But for him Poseidon had made ready a house under the earth constructed by Hephaestus. And Dawn fell in love with Orion and carried him off and brought him to Delos; for Aphrodite caused Dawn to be perpetually in love, because she had bedded with Ares.
But Orion was killed, as some say, for challenging Artemis to a match at quoits, but some say he was shot by Artemis for offering violence to Opis, one of the maidens who had come from the Hyperboreans.

This extract is from: Apollodorus, Library and Epitome (ed. Sir James George Frazer, 1921). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Porphyrion

One of the Giants. He tried to throw the island of Delos upon the gods, and was destroyed by Zeus at Heracles


Brizo

A goddess localized in Delos, to whom women, in particular, paid worship as being the protectress of mariners. They set before her eatables of various kinds (fish being excluded) in little boats. She also presided over an oracle.


Brizo, a prophetic goddess of the island of Delos, who sent dreams and revealed their meaning to man. Her name is connected with brizein, to fall asleep. The women of Delos offered sacrifices to her in vessels of the shape of boats, and the sacrifices consisted of various things; but fishes were never offered to her. Prayers were addressed to her that she might grant everything that was good, but especially, that she might protect ships. (Athen. viii.; Eustath. ad Hom.; Hesych. s. v. Brizomantis.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Glaucus

(Glaukos). A sea deity . . Some said that he dwelt with the Nereides at Delos, where he gave responses to all who sought them.


Asia

  The Oceanid wife of Prometheus. They had the son Deucalion, who with his wife Pyrrha was the only one to survive the great flood Zeus had sent to destroy mankind.
  Asia was together with her husband the creator of the human clay, which was first destroyed then recovered. She also named the continent of Asia.

This text is cited Sept 2003 from the In2Greece URL below.


Delius

Delius and Delia, (Delios and Delia or Delias), surnames of Apollo and Artemis respectively, which are derived from the island of Delos the birthplace of those two divinities. (Virg. Aen. vi. 12, Eclog. vii. 29; Val. Flacc. i. 446; Orph. Hymn. 33. 8.) They are likewise applied, especially in the plural, to other divinities that were worshipped in Delos, viz. Demeter, Aphrodite, and the nymphs. (Aristoph. Thesm. 333; Callim. Hymn. in Dian. 169, Hymn. in Del. 323; Hom. Hymn. in Apoll. Del. 157.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Loxo

Loxo, a daughter of Boreas, one of the Hyperborean maidens, who brought the worship of Artemis to Delos, whence it is also used as a surname of Artemis herself. (Callim. Hymn. in Del. 292; Nonnus, Dionys. v. p. 168)


Kings

Anius

Anius (Anios). Son of Apollo by Rhoeo or Creusa, whose father, Staphylus of Naxos, a son of Dionysus and Ariadne, committed her to the sea in a box. She was carried to Delos, and there gave birth to her son Anius. Apollo taught him divination, and made him his priest and king of Delos. His son Thasus, like Linus and Actaeon, was torn to pieces by dogs, after which no dogs were allowed in the island. His daughters by the nymph Dorippe, being descendants of Dionysus, had the gift of turning anything they pleased into wine, corn, or oil; but when Agamemnon, on his way to Troy, wished to take them from their father by force, Dionysus changed them into doves.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Anius (Anios), a son of Apollo by Creusa, or according to others by Rhoeo, the daughter of Staphylus, who when her pregnancy became known was exposed by her angry father in a chest on the waves of the sea. The chest landed in Delos, and when Rhoeo was delivered of a boy she consecrated him to the service of Apollo, who endowed him with prophetic powers (Diod. v. 62; Conon, Narrat. 41). Anius had by Dryope three daughters, Oeno, Spermo, and Elais, to whom Dionysus gave the power of producing at will any quantity of wine, corn, and oil --whence they were called Oenotropae. When the Greeks on their expedition to Troy landed in Delos, Anius endeavoured to persuade them to stay with him for nine years, as it was decreed by fate that they should not take Troy until the tenth year, and he promised with the help of his three daughters to supply them with all they wanted during that period (Pherecyd. ap. Tzetz. ad Lycoph. 569; Ov. Met. xiii. 623, &c.; comp. Dictys Cret. i. 23). After the fall of Troy, when Aeneas arrived in Delos, he was kindly received by Anius (Ov. l. c.; Virg. Aen. iii. 80, with Servius), and a Greek tradition stated that Aeneas married a daughter of Anius, of the name of Lavinia, who was, like her father, endowed with prophetic powers, followed Aeneas to Italy, and died at Lavinium (Dionys. Hal. i. 59; Aurel. Vict. De Orig. Gent. Rom. 9). Two other mythical personages, one a son of Aeneas by Lavinia, and the other a king of Etruria, from whom the river Anio derived its name, occur in Serv. ad Aen. iii. 80, and Plut. Parallel. 40.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Gods & heroes related to the location

Theseus

On his voyage from Crete, Theseus put in at Delos, and having sacrificed to the god and dedicated in his temple the image of Aphrodite which he had received from Ariadne, he danced with his youths a dance which they say is still performed by the Delians, being an imitation of the circling passages in the Labyrinth, and consisting of certain rhythmic involutions and evolutions. This kind of dance, as Dicaearchus tells us, is called by the Delians The Crane, and Theseus danced it round the altar called Keraton, which is constructed of horns ("kerata") taken entirely from the left side of the head. They say that he also instituted athletic contests in Delos, and that the custom was then begun by him of giving a palm to the victors.

This extract is from: Plutarch's Lives (ed. Bernadotte Perrin, 1914). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Odysseus

I can only compare you to a young palm tree which I saw when I was at Delos growing near the altar of Apollo - for I was there, too, with many people after me, when I was on that journey which has been the source of all my troubles. (Homer, Odyss. 6.149)


Persons related to the place

Olen

A mythical poet of Lycia belonging to early Greek times, standing in connection with the worship of Apollo in Delos and represented as having composed the first hymns for the Delians. The legend which was especially attributed to him was that of Apollo's sojourn among the Hyperboreans


The Lycian Olen, an earlier poet, who composed for the Delians, among other hymns, one to Eileithyia, styles her "the clever spinner", clearly identifying her with fate, and makes her older than Cronus.(Paus.8.21.1)


Achaeia

Comes to Delos from Hyperboreans.


Hecaerge

Hecaerge. A Hyperborean maiden, daughter of Boreas. She was one of those who introduced the worship of Artemis into Delos.
Epithet often applied to Artemis as being one who effects her works from a distance, which is the meaning of the word. The masculine form (hekaergos) is in like manner applied to Apollo.


Hecaerge, (Hekaerge), a daughter of Boreas, and one of the Hyperborean maidens, who were believed to have introduced the worship of Artemis in Delos. (Callim. Hymn. in Del. 292; Paus. i. 43.4, v. 7.4; Herod. iv. 35.) The name Hecaerge signifies hitting at a distance; and it is not improbable that the story of the Hyperborean maiden may have arisen out of an attribute of Artemis, who bore the surname of Hecaerge. (Anton. Lib. 13.) Aphrodite had the same surname at Iulis in Cos. (Anton. Lib. 1.)


Hyperoche

Hyperoche, (Huperoche), according to the Delian tradition, was one of the two maidens who were sent by the Hyperboreans to Delos, to convey thither certain sacred offerings, enclosed in stalks of wheat. She and her companion having died in Delos, were honoured by the Delians with certain ceremonies, described by Herodotus (iv. 33-35).


Laodice

Laodice (Laodike). A Hyperborean maiden, who, together with Hyperoche, and five companions, was sent from the country of the Hyperboreans to carry sacrifices to the island of Delos. (Herod. iv. 33.)


Lavinia

Lavinia, a daughter of Latinus and Amata, and the wife of Aeneas, by whom she became the mother of Ascanius or Silvius. (Liv. i. 1; Virg. Aen. vii. 52, &c., vi. 761; Dionys. i. 70.) Some traditions describe her as the daughter of the priest Anius, in Delos. (Dionys. i. 50; Aur. Vict. Orig. Gent. Rom. 9.)


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