Mythology STENYKLAROS (Ancient city) MESSINIA - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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Listed 7 sub titles with search on: Mythology for destination: "STENYKLAROS Ancient city MESSINIA".


Mythology (7)

Kings

Cresphontes

Cresphontes, a son of Aristomachus, who, with his brothers Temenus and Aristodemus, conquered the Peloponnesus. This was the famous conquest achieved by the Heraclidae. He and his two sons were subsequently slain by the Messenians.

Cresphontes Kresphontes), a Heracleid, a son of Aristomachus, and one of the conquerors of Peloponnesus, who obtained Messenia for his share. But during an insurrection of the Messenian nobles, he and two of his sons were slain. A third son, Aepytus, was induced by his mother, Merope, to avenge his father. (Apollod. ii. 8.4, &c.; Paus. ii. 18.6, iv. 3.3, 31.9, viii. 5. 34)

Aepytus

Aepytus. The younger son of Cresphontes, king of Messenia, and of Merope, daughter of the Arcadian king Cypselus. When his father and brothers were murdered during an insurrection, Aepytus, who was with his grandfather Cypselus, alone escaped. The throne of Cresphontes was meantime occupied by Polyphontes, who forced Merope to become his wife. When Aepytus had grown to manhood he returned to his kingdom, and put Polyphontes to death. From him the kings of Messenia were called Aepytidae.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Aepytus. The youngest son of Cresphontes the Heraclid, king of Messenia, and of Merope, the daughter of the Arcadian king Cypselus. Cresphontes and his other sons were murdered during an insurrection, and Aepytus alone, who was educated in the house of his grandfather Cypselus, escaped the danger. The throne of Cresphontes was in the meantime occupied by the Heraclid Polyphontes, who also forced Merope to become his wife (Apollod. ii. 8.5). When Aepytus had grown to manhood, he was enabled by the aid of Holcas, his father-in-law, to return to his kingdom, punish the murderers of his father, and put Polyphontes to death. He left a son, Glaucus, and it [p. 36] was from him that subsequently the kings of Messenia were called Aepytids instead of the more general name Heraclids. (Paus. iv. 3.3, &c., viii. 5.5; Hygin. Fab. 137, 184)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Sep 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Glaucus

Glaucus. A son of the Messenian king Aepytus, whom he succeeded on the throne. He distinguished himself by his piety towards the gods, and was the first who offered sacrifices to Machaon. (Paus. iv. 3.6.)

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