Mythology PISSA (Ancient city) ANCIENT OLYMPIA - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

Location information

Listed 22 sub titles with search on: Mythology for destination: "PISSA Ancient city ANCIENT OLYMPIA".


Mythology (22)

Eponymous founders or settlers

Pisus

The founder of the city, they say, was Pisus, the son of Perieres, the son of Aeolus. (Paus. 6.22.2)

Gods & demigods

Artemis Cordaca

Cordaca (Kordaka), a surname of Artemis in Elis, derived from an indecent dance called ko/rdac, which the companions of Pelops are said to have performed in honour of the goddess after a victory which they had won. (Paus. vi. 22.1)

Kings

   Oenomaus, (Oinomaos). King of Pisa in Elis, son of Ares and father of Hippodamia. An oracle had warned him that he should perish by the hands of his son-in-law; and as his horses were swifter than those of any other mortal, he declared that all who came forward as suitors for Hippodamia's hand should contend with him in a chariot-race, that whoever conquered should receive her, and that whoever was conquered should suffer death. The race-course extended from Pisa to the altar of Poseidon, on the Corinthian Isthmus. The suitor started with Hippodamia in a chariot, and Oenomaus then hastened with his swift horses after the lovers. He had overtaken and slain many a suitor, when Pelops, the son of Tantalus, came to Pisa. Pelops bribed Myrtilus, the charioteer of Oenomaus, to take out the linch-pins from the wheels of his master's chariot, and Pelops received from Poseidon a golden chariot and horses of great swiftness. In the race which followed, the chariot of Oenomaus broke down, and he fell out and was killed. Thus Pelops obtained Hippodamia and the kingdom of Pisa.
    There are some variations in this story, such as that Oenomaus was himself in love with his own daughter, and for this reason slew her lovers. Myrtilus also is said to have loved Hippodamia, and as she favoured the suit of Pelops, she persuaded Myrtilus to take the linch-pins out of the wheels of her father's chariot. As Oenomaus was breathing his last, he pronounced a curse upon Myrtilus. This curse had its desired effect, for as Pelops refused to give to Myrtilus the reward he had promised, or else because Myrtilus had attempted to dishonour Hippodamia, Pelops thrust him down from Cape Geraestus. Myrtilus, while dying, likewise pronounced a curse upon Pelops, which was the cause of all the calamities that afterwards befell his house.The tomb of Oenomaus was shown on the river Cladeus, in Elis. His house was destroyed by lightning, and only one pillar of it remained standing.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Oenomaus : Various WebPages

Alxion

Father of Oenomaus.

Heroes

   Alcathous, (Alkathoos). The son of Pelops and Hippodamia, who obtained as his wife Evaechme, the daughter of Megareus, by slaying the Cithaeronian lion, and succeeded his father-in-law as king of Megara. He restored the walls of Megara, which is therefore sometimes called Alcathoe by the poets. In this work he was assisted by Apollo. The stone upon which the god used to place his lyre while he was at work was believed, even in late times, to give forth a sound, when struck, similar to that of a lyre.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Myrtilos (Myrtilus)

Perseus Encyclopedia

   Myrtilus, (Murtilos). Son of Hermes, by Cleobule or Myrto. He was the charioteer of Oenomaus, whose defeat by Pelops in the race was due to his treachery. When he demanded the reward that had been settled, the half of the realm of Oenomaus, Pelops threw him into the sea near Geraestus, in Euboea, and that part of the Aegean was thence called the Myrtoan Sea. He was placed among the stars as the constellation Auriga.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sphaerus or Cillas

Charioteer of Pelops, his tomb.

Chrysippus

Chrysippus (Chrusippos). A son of Pelops, carried off by Laius. This circumstance became a theme with many ancient writers, and hence the story assumed different shapes, according to the fancy of those who handled it. The death of Chrysippus was also related in different ways. According to the common account, he was slain by Atreus, at the instigation of his step-mother, Hippodamia.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Nov 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Chrysippus

Chrysippus (Chrusippos), a son of Pelops by the nymph Axioche or by Danaiis (Plut. Parall. Hist. Gr. et Rom. 33), and accordingly a stepbrother of Alcathous, Atreus, and Thyestes. While still a boy, he was carried off by king Laius of Thebes, who instructed him in driving a chariot (Apollod. iii. 5.5). According to others, he was carried off by Theseus during the contests celebrated by Pelops (Hygin. Feb. 271); but Pelops recovered him by force of arms. His step-mother Hippodamieia hated him, and induced her solns Atreus and Thyestes to kill him; whereas, according to another tradition, Chrysippus was killed by his either Pelops himself (Paus. vi. 20.4; Hygin. Flb. 85; Schol. ad Thuc. i. 9). A second mythical Chrysippus is mentioned by Apollodorus (ii. 1.5).

Hippalcmus

Hippalcmus, (Hippalkmos), the name of two mythical personages, the one a son of Pelops and Hippodameia, and the other an Argonaut. (Schol. ad Pind. Ol. i. 144; Hygin. Fab. 14.)

Heroines

Hippodameia (Hippodamia)

   Hippodamia, (Hippodameia). A daughter of Oenomaus, king of Pisa, in Elis, who married Pelops, son of Tantalus.

Suitors

Marmax

Suitor of Hippodamia, slain by Oenomaus.

Suitors of Hippodameia

According to the epic poem called the Great Eoeae the next after Marmax to be killed by Oenomaus was Alcathus, son of Porthaon; after Alcathus came Euryalus, Eurymachus and Crotalus. Now the parents and fatherlands of these I was unable to discover, but Acrias, the next after them to be killed, one might guess to have been a Lacedaemonian and the founder of Acriae. After Acrias they say that Oenomaus slew Capetus, Lycurgus, Lasius, Chalcodon and Tricolonus, who, according to the Arcadians, was the descendant and namesake of Tricolonus, the son of Lycaon. After Tricolonus there met their fate in the race Aristomachus and Prias, and then Pelagon, Aeolius and Cronius. Some add to the aforesaid Erythras, the son of Leucon, the son of Athamas, after whom was named Erythrae in Boeotia, and Eioneus, the son of Magnes the son of Aeolus.

Various

Parthenia and Eripha

Mares of Marmax.

You are able to search for more information in greater and/or surrounding areas by choosing one of the titles below and clicking on "more".


GTP Headlines

Receive our daily Newsletter with all the latest updates on the Greek Travel industry.

Subscribe now!

Ferry Departures

Promotions