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Listed 28 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for wider area of: "ARCADIA Prefecture PELOPONNISOS" .


Homeric world (28)

Gods & demigods

AKAKISSION (Ancient city) MEGALOPOLI

Hermes the Helper

(Hom. Il. 16.185 & Od. 24.10)


Acacesius (Akakesios), a surname of Hermes (Callim. Hym. in Dian. 143), for which Homer (Il. xvi. 185; Od. xxiv. 10) uses the form akaketa (akaketes). Some writers derive it from the Arcadian town of Acacesium, in which he was believed to have been brought up by king Acacus; others from kakos, and assign to it the meaning: the god who cannot be hurt, or who does not hurt. The same attribute is also given to Prometheus (Hes. Theog. 614), whence it may be inferred that its meaning is that of benefactor or deliverer from evil.


TRAPEZOUS (Ancient city) GORTYS

Giant (Giants)

Homer mentions in Odyssey that the Giants were mortals and insolents (Od. 7.205-6, 4.59-60). Pausanias mentions that the Giants were thought to be dragonfooted, but this turned out to be false, when a corpse of a giant was found and was of a human shape (Paus. 8,29,3-4).


Gigantes. In Homer the Gigantes are a wild and gigantic race of aborigines, kinsmen of the gods, as are the Cyclopes and Phaeacians. With their king Eurymedon, they are destroyed for their wickedness. Hesiod makes them the sons of Gaea, sprung from the blood of the mutilated Uranus. Neither Hesiod nor Homer knew anything of their struggle with the gods (Gigantomachia), the story of which seems to be a reflection of the myth of the Titans and their contest with the gods, and to be associated with local legends. The two are often confused by later poets. The place of the contest was Phlegra, or the place of burning; and Phlegra was always localized in volcanic regions. In the earlier stories it is on the Macedonian peninsula of Pallene; and in later times on the Phlegraean plains in Campania between Cumae and Capua, or again at Tartessus in Spain. Led on by Alcyoneus and Porphyrion, they hurled rocks and burning trunks of trees against heaven. But the gods called Heracles to their assistance, a prophecy having warned them that they would be unable to destroy the giants without the aid of a mortal. Heracles slew not only Alcyoneus, but gave the others, whom the gods had struck down, their death-blow with his arrows. As Enceladus was flying, Athene threw the island of Sicily upon him. Polybotes was buried by Poseidon under the island of Nisyros, a piece of the island of Cos, which Poseidon had broken off with his trident, with all the giants who had fled there. Besides these, the following names are given among others: Agrius, Ephialtes, Pallas, Clytius, Eurytus, Hippolytus, Thoon. In the oldest works of art the Giants are represented in human form and equipped with armour and spears; but in course of time their attributes became terrific--awful faces, long hanging hair and beard, the skins of wild animals for garments, trunks of trees and clubs for weapons. In the latest representations, but not before, their bodies end in two scaly snakes instead of feet, as in the In the Gigantomachia of Pergamus, the grandest representation of the subject in antiquity, we find a great variety of forms; some quite human, others with snakes' feet and powerful wings, others with still bolder combinations of shape; some are naked, some clothed with skins, some fully armed, and others slinging stones.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


The Gigantomachy at the spring Olympias

Battle between the (Olympian) gods and giants. The Arcadians claim that the battle took place near the spring Olympias in Trapezous, and not at Thrace.


Greek heroes of the Trojan War

ARKADIA (Ancient area) PELOPONNISOS

Stentor

A hero from Arcadia or Thrace, famous for his extremely loud voice. According to Homer, his voice was as loud as the voices of fifty men together. In the passage 5.784 of the Iliad, Hera appeared in his likeness.


A herald of the Greeks in the Trojan War, whose voice was as loud as that of fifty other men together, so that his name has become proverbial for any loud-voiced person ( Il.v. 783; Juv.xiii. 112).


Greek leaders in the Trojan War

TEGEA (Ancient city) ARCADIA

Agapenor

He was the son of Ancaeus and succeeded Echemus to the throne of Tegea. He participated in the Trojan War as the leader of the Arcadians with sixty ships (Il. 2.609). After the war, on the return home, a storm carried his fleet to Cyprus, where Agapenor founded Paphos and built the sanctuary of Aphrodite at Palaepaphos (Paus. 8,5,2-3)..


Agapenor, a son of Ancaeus, and grandson of Lycurgus. He was king of the Arcadians, and received sixty ships from Agamemnon, in which he led his Arcadians to Troy (Hom. Il. ii. 609, &c.; Hygin. Fab. 97). He also occurs among the suitors of Helen (Hygin. Fab. 81; Apollod. iii. 10.8). On his return from Troy he was cast by a storm on the coast of Cyprus, where he founded the town of Paphus, and in it the famous temple of Aphrodite (Paus. viii. 5.2, &c.).



Greeks of the Homeric Catalogue of Ships

ARKADIA (Ancient area) PELOPONNISOS

Trojan War

Arcadia, kingdom of Agapenor, bordered Aegialea of Achaia, Sicyon, Argolis, Messene, Lacedaemon and Elis. It participated in the Trojan War with 60 ships, which were given by Agamemnon because Arcadia had neither access to the sea nor fleet (Il. 2.603-610). Arcadian cities mentioned by Homer are: Pheneos, Orchomenus, Rhipe, Stratia, Enispe, Tegea, Mantineia, Stymphalus and Parrhasia.


ENISPI (Ancient city) VYTINA

Trojan War

Enispe participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships. The poet calls it "wind-swept" (Il. 2.606).


MANTINIA (Ancient city) ARCADIA

Trojan War

Mantineia participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships. The poet calls it "lovely" (Il. 2.607).


ORCHOMENOS (Ancient city) LEVIDI

Trojan War

Orchomenus participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships. The poet calls the city "rich in flocks" (Il. 2.605).


PARASSIA (Ancient city) MEGALOPOLI

Trojan War

Parrhasia participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.608).


PARASSIA (Ancient area) ARKADIA

Trojan War

Parrhasia participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships. (Il. 2.605).


RIPI (Ancient city) ARCADIA

Trojan War

Rhipe participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.606).


STRATII (Ancient city) ARCADIA

Trojan War

Stratia participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.606).


TEGEA (Ancient city) ARCADIA

Trojan War

Tegea participated in the Trojan War and is listed in the Homeric Catalogue of Ships (Il. 2.607).


Heroes

Ancaeus

Ancaeus, son of Lycurgus by Eurynome and father of Agapenor, leader of the Arcadians in the Trojan War (Il. 2.609), was an Argonaut and was killed during the hunting of the Calydonian boar (Paus. 8.4.10, 8,45,2).


Ancaeus, (Ankaios). Son of the Arcadian Lycurgus, and father of Agapenor. He was one of the Argonauts, and was killed by the Calydonian boar.


Ancaeus (Ankaios). A son of the Arcadian Lycurgus and Creophile or Eurynome, and father of Agapenor (Apollod. i. 8.2, iii. 9.2, 10.8; Hygin. Fab. 173; Hom. Il. ii. 609). He was one of the Argonauts and partook in the Calydonian hunt, in which he was killed by the boar (Apollod. i. 9.16 and 23; comp. Paus. viii. 5.2, 45.2; Apollon. Rhod. ii. 894; Ov. Met. viii. 400).


Kings

Lycurgus

He was the son of Aleus by Neaera and grandfather of Agapenor. He was notorious for killing by guile Areithous, whom he despoiled and, when he grew old, he gave his mace of iron to Ereuthalion (Il. 7.142).
According to Pausanias, Lycurgus outlived both his sons, Epochus and Ancaeus (Paus. 8,4,10-8,5,1).


Lycurgus, (Lukourgos).King in Arcadia, son of Aleus and Neaera, brother of Cepheus and Auge, husband of Cleophile, Eurynome, or Antinoe, and father of Ancaeus, Epochus, Amphidamas, and Iasus. Lycurgus killed Areithous, who used to fight with a club. Lycurgus bequeathed this club to his slave Ereuthalion, his sons having died before him.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Oct 2002 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Lycurgus (Lukourgos). A son of Aleus and Neaera, and a brother of Cepheus and Auge, was king in Arcadia, and married to Cleophile, Eurynome, or Antinoe, by whom he became the father of Ancaeus, Epochus, Amphidamas, and Jasus. (Apollod. iii. 9.1, &c.; Schol. ad Apollon. Rhod. i. 164.) Some also call Cepheus his son, and add another of the name of Jocrites. (Apollod. i. 8. 2; Steph. Byz. s. v. Botachidai.) Lycurgus killed Areithous with his lance, meeting him in a narrow valley. He took the club with which his enemy had been armed, and used it himself; and on his death he bequeathed it to his slave Ereuthalion, his sons having died before him. (Horn. Il. vii. 142, &c.; Paus. viii. 4. 7.) His tomb was afterwards shown at Lepreos. (Paus. v. 5. 4.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2006 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Place-names according to Homer

ARKADIA (Ancient area) PELOPONNISOS

Celadon

A river in Elis or in Arcadia, which is mentioned by Homer (Il. 7.133).


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