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Listed 11 sub titles with search on: Homeric world for destination: "KOLCHIS Ancient country GEORGIA".


Homeric world (11)

Kings

Aeetes & Idyia

Aeetes, son of Helius and father of Medea, was the king of Colchis, against whom the Argonauts campaigned in order to take the golden fleece (Od. 10.137, 12.70).


Aeetes or Aeeta (Aietes), a son of Helios and Perseis (Apollod. i. 9.1 Hes. Theog. 957). According to others his mother's name was Persa (Hygin. Praef), or Antiope (Schol. ad Pind. Ol. xiii. 52). He was a brother of Circe, Pasiphae, and Perses (Hom. Od. x. 136). He was married to Idyia, a daughter of Oceanus, by whom he had two daughters, Medeia and Chalciope, and one son, Absyrtus (Hesiod. Theog. 960; Apollod. i. 9, 23). He was king of Colchis at the time when Phrixus brought thither the golden fleece. At one time he was expelled from his kingdom by his brother Perses, but was restored by his daughter Medeia (Apollod. i. 9.28).


Idyia or Eidyia (Iduia), that is, the knowing goddess, a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, and the wife of the Colchian king Aeetes. (Hes. Theog. 352; Apollon. Rhod. iii. 243; Hygin. Fab. 25; Eustath. ad Hom.)



Nymphs

Perse

Thence we sailed on, grieved at heart, glad to have escaped death, though we had lost our dear comrades;and we came to the isle of Aeaea, where dwelt fair-tressed Circe, a dread goddess of human speech, own sister to Aeetes of baneful mind; and both are sprung from Helius, who gives light to mortals, and from Perse, their mother, whom Oceanus begot.


Perse. The daughter of Oceanus and wife of Helios, by whom she became the mother of Aeetes and Circe. Others speak of her as also the mother of Perses and Pasiphae.


Circe

the daughter of the Sun and of Perse or Perseis, sister of Aeetes, a sea-nymph, distinguished for her magic arts, whose abode, after her flight from Colchis, was said to be in the region of the promontory of Circeii, in Latium. ( More information at mythical land Aia )


Ancient myths

Argonautae

Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities (1898)


Further information concerning Argonautae can be found in the the ancient city of Iolkos


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Ferry Departures
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