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Listed 8 sub titles with search on: History for destination: "TINOS Island KYKLADES".


History (8)

Official pages

1.Mythology - Ancient Period

  From ancient times, Tinos is also known as "Idrousa" and "Ophiousa". This is explained by the fact that the island was blessed by a great many sources, which attracted snakes. These were released by Poseidon, according to the believes of the ancient people. The name of the island is supposed to be of the Phoenician root "Tanoth" , which means "snake". Others think that the island took its name from the very first settlement of Tinos. Aristophanes mentioned it as "Scorodophoros", as its inhabitants produced garlic.
  The first inhabitants of Tinos were Ionians from Karia in Asia Minor.

This text is cited May 2003 from the University of Patras' XENIOS DIAS website URL below.


2. Classic, Hellenistic & Roman period

  During the Median Wars, Tinos was occupied by the Persians and was forced to contribute its fleet of three ships under the command of Panetios of Sosimeni. These ships deserted in order to inform the Greek army of an escape-route from the Gulf of Salamina, where they were surrounded by Persians and the alternative would have been a battle with an uncertain outcome.
  The army of Tinos also took part in the battle of Platei. A list of the names of the soldiers can be found in Delphiko Tripoda.
  After the wars, Tinos fell under the hegemony of Athens, until Spartan rule took over. Later still, either by chance or by following the example of other islands, it was inherited by Philipos, whereafter it finally passed to Rome.

This text is cited May 2003 from the University of Patras' XENIOS DIAS website URL below.


3. Byzantine & Venetian Period-Turkish occupation

  During the Byzantine period, the island belonged to the "Thema tis Ellados". After repeated and murderous invasions of Saracene pirates, it passed to the Venetians in 1207. Their domination of the island started under the rule of the Gizi family. It lasted till 1390, when the Tiniot ruler Nikolaos Venieros was appointed.
  After Constantinople was captured by the Turks in 1453, the islands gradually came under their rule. Between 1536 and 1697, they invaded Tinos 11 times. Finally, they occupied it in 1715, through the betrayal of the Venetian lord Valvi: wet gunpowder and sabotaged fire-arms made the defense of the fortress impossible. The conditions of the surrender of Tinos were honourable: the courageous inhabitants were in no way to blame for the defeat, and were allowed to leave the fortress carrying their banners and guns.
  The Turkish occupation left the inhabitants of the island an amazing extent of freedom: the right to worship their God and to appoint their own bishop, the right to build as many schools and churches as they wished, the favour of being released from all taxes for a duration of 2 years. The main tax was dropped as well, leaving them just the land tax. They were not obliged to wear the fez, and were permitted to wear red leggings (something strictly forbidden to other occupied Greeks).
  Between 1771 and 1775, the island was under Russian occupation. On March 31, 1821, the Greek banner was raised on Pirgos by the revolution's leader, Georgios Palamaris. During the revolution, the Tiniots fought valiantly on land and on sea. Tinos accepted all the escapees of the "catastrophy" of Kidonion and of Kasos, the massacre of Chios, and the burning of Psara and Crete.
  But above all, the auspicious discovery, in 1823, of the miraculous icon of Megalohari, proved to be of the greatest influence in supporting the fighting Greeks.

This text is cited May 2003 from the University of Patras' XENIOS DIAS website URL below.


4. New period

  Tinos has always played an important role in the independent Greek state. Its heroes' deeds testify to the courage they showed in the battle for their independence, often at the cost of great suffering and sacrifice.
  When, in August 1940, the cruiser "ELLI" was sunk by enemy forces in the port of Tinos, the second world war took on the significance of a "holy struggle". Tinos, believed to be under the protection of the Virgin Mary (eternal guardian in war and peace) became a sacred symbol for the entire Greek nation.
  During the full length of the occupation, the island provided significant support to the Allied opposition.
  1. Due to its geographic position and the structure of its coasts, Tinos found itself on the main escape routes for the retreating army and refugees on the way to the Middle East, by diesel-powered ships, via Tsesme in Turkey. Among others, George Papandreou and Kostas Karamanlis took this route into temporary exile in Alexandria. About 4.000 volunteers are believed to have passed from Tinos to the Middle East.
  2. One of the best Allied espionage and sabotage units of the Aegean Sea was based on the island. The Germans carried out cruel reprisals because the Tinos wireless was instrumental in sending information to the Allied Headquarters in the Middle East.

This text is cited May 2003 from the University of Patras' XENIOS DIAS website URL below.


Participation in the fights of the Greeks

Battle at Plateae

On the right of the pedestal are inscribed the cities which took part in the engagement: first the Lacedaemonians, after them the Athenians, third the Corinthians, fourth the Sicyonians, [2] fifth the Aeginetans; after the Aeginetans, the Megarians and Epidaurians, of the Arcadians the people of Tegea and Orchomenus, after them the dwellers in Phlius, Troezen and Hermion, the Tirynthians from the Argolid, the Plataeans alone of the Boeotians, the Argives of Mycenae, the islanders of Ceos and Melos, Ambraciots of the Thesprotian mainland, the Tenians and the Lepreans, who were the only people from Triphylia, but from the Aegean and the Cyclades there came not only the Tenians but also the Naxians and Cythnians, Styrians too from Euboea, after them Eleans, Potidaeans, Anactorians, and lastly the Chalcidians on the Euripus.

This extract is from: Pausanias. Description of Greece (ed. W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., & H.A. Ormerod, 1918). Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Battle of Salamis

Aristides went in and told them, saying that he had come from Aegina and had barely made it past the blockade when he sailed out, since all the Hellenic camp was surrounded by Xerxes' ships. He advised them to prepare to defend themselves. He said this and left, and again a dispute arose among them. The majority of the generals did not believe the news.
While they were still held by disbelief, a trireme of Tenian deserters arrived, captained by Panaetius son of Sosimenes, which brought them the whole truth. For this deed the Tenians were engraved on the tripod at Delphi with those who had conquered the barbarian. With this ship that deserted at Salamis and the Lemnian which deserted earlier at Artemisium, the Hellenic fleet reached its full number of three hundred and eighty ships, for it had fallen short of the number by two ships.
When they found the words of the Tenians worthy of belief, the Hellenes prepared to fight at sea.

This extract is from: Herodotus. The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley, 1920), Cambridge. Harvard University Press. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


When those stationed with Xerxes' fleet had been to see the Laconian disaster at Thermopylae, they crossed over from Trachis to Histiaea, waited three days, and then sailed through the Euripus, and in three more days they were at Phalerum, the port of Athens. I think no less a number invaded Athens by land and sea than came to Sepias and Thermopylae. Those killed by the storm, at Thermopylae, and in the naval battles at Artemisium, I offset with those who did not yet follow the king: the Melians and Dorians and Locrians and the whole force of Boeotia except the Thespians and Plataeans; and the Carystians and Andrians and Teneans and all the rest of the islanders, except the five cities whose names I previously mentioned. The farther into Hellas the Persian advanced, the more nations followed him.

This extract is from: Herodotus. The Histories (ed. A. D. Godley, 1920), Cambridge. Harvard University Press. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains comments & interesting hyperlinks.


Alliances

Rhodes - Nesiotic League

In the 3d c. B.C. Tinos became one of the principal representatives of the Nesiotic League and developed close ties with Rhodes.


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