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Listed 6 sub titles with search on: Biographies for destination: "POTIDEA Ancient city CHALKIDIKI".


Biographies (6)

Historians

Aristobulus, 4th/3rd c. B.C.

Aristobulus, (Aristoboulos). A Greek historian, who in his youth accompanied Alexander the Great on his campaigns. In his eighty-fifth year, when living at Cassandrea in Thrace, he wrote a work upon Alexander, in which he recorded his careful observations on geography, ethnography, and natural science. The book is highly praised for its trustworthiness, but only fragments of it have reached us. He and Ptolemy were the chief authorities for Arrian's Anabasis.

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Aristobulus (Aristoboulos) of Cassandreia, the son of Aristobulus, one of the companions of Alexander the Great in his Asiatic conquests, wrote a history of Alexander, which was one of the chief sources used by Arrian in the composition of his work. Aristoblius lived to the age of ninety, and did not begin to write his history till he was eighty-four (Lucian, Macrob. 22). His work is also frequently referred to by Athenaeus (ii., vi., x., xii.), Plutarch (Alex. cc. 15, 16, 18, 21, 46, 75), and Strabo (xi., xiv., xv., xvi, xvii). The anecdote which Lucian relates (Quoslodo hist. conscrib. c. 12) about Aristobulus is supposed by modern writers to refer to Onesicritus.
  Plutarch refers to a work upon stones, and another upon the affairs of Italy, written by an Aristobulus, but whether he is the same person as the preceding, is uncertain. (Plut. de Fluv. c. 14. Parall. Min. c. 32.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Tyrants

Apollodorus

Apollodorus. Tyrant of Cassandreia (formerly Potidaea) in the peninsula of Pallene. He at first pretended to be a friend of the people; but when he had gained their confidence, he formed a conspiracy for the purpose of making himself tyrant, and bound his accomplices by most barbarous ceremonies described in Diodorus (xxii. Exc.) When he had gained his object, about B. C. 279, he began his tyrannical reign, which in cruelty, rapaciousness, and debauchery, has seldom been equalled in any country. The ancients mention him along with the most detestable tyrants that ever lived (Polyb. vii. 7; Seneca, De Ira, ii. 5, De Benef. vii. 19). But notwithstanding the support which he derived from the Gauls, who were then penetrating southward, he was unable to maintain himself, and was conquered and put to death by Antigonus Gonatas (Polyaen. vi. 7, iv. 6, 18 ; Aelian, V. H. xiv. 41; Hist. An. v. 15; Plut. De Sera Num. Vind. 10, 11; Paus. iv. 5.1; Heinsius, ad Ovid. ex Pont. ii. 9. 43).

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Related to the place

Arsinoe

The daughter of Ptolemy I. of Egypt and Berenice. She married Lysimachus, king of Thrace, who was already advanced in years, by whom she had several children. Lysimachus, setting out for Asia, left her in Macedouia, with two sons, Lysimachus and Philip, a part of the fruits of their union. This monarch having been slain in an expedition, Ptolemy Ceraunus seized on Macedonia, but could not take the city of Cassandria, where Arsinoe had taken refuge with her children. He therefore offered her his hand in marriage, and with much difficulty obtained her consent. But no sooner had he been admitted into the city for the purpose of celebrating the nuptials, than he caused her two sons to be slain, and exiled Arsinoe herself to Samothrace. From this island she soon took her departure to wed Ptolemy Philadelphus, her own brother, the first instance of this kind of union, and which became afterwards so common in the time of the Ptolemies. Although many years older than Ptolemy, she nevertheless inspired him with such a passion that, after her death, he gave her name to one of the nomes of Egypt (Arsinoitis), and to several cities both in that country and elsewhere. He even gave orders to have a temple erected to her, but his own death and that of the architect prevented the fulfilment of his wishes. It was intended to have had the ceiling of loadstone, and the statue of iron, in order that the latter might appear to be suspended in the air ( Plin. H. N.xxxiv. 14).

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Phila

The daughter of Antipater, regent of Macedonia, and celebrated as one of the noblest and most virtuous women of the age in which she lived. She was married to Craterus in B.C. 322, and after the death of Craterus, who survived his marriage with her scarcely a year, she was again married to the young Demetrius, the son of Antigonus. She shared with her husband his various vicissitudes of fortune; but when he was expelled from Macedonia in B.C. 287, she put an end to her own life at Cassandrea, unable to bear this unexpected reverse. She left two children by Demetrius--Antigonus, surnamed Gonatas, who became king of Macedonia; and a daughter, Stratonice, married first to Seleucus, and afterwards to his son Antiochus ( Plut. Demetr.14-45; Diod.xx. 93).

This text is from: Harry Thurston Peck, Harpers Dictionary of Classical Antiquities. Cited Mar 2003 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Ancient comedy playwrites

Poseidippus

Poseidippus or Posidippus (Poseidippos, Posidippos, both forms are found in MSS; the inscription on the statue in the Vatican gives the former).

1. An Athenian comic poet of the New Comedy, was the son of Cyniscus, and a native of Cassandreia in Macedonia. He is one of the six who are mentioned by the anonymous writer on Comedy as the most celebrated poets of the New Comedy. In time, he was the last, not only of these six, but of all the poets of the New Comedy. He began to exhibit dramas in the third year after the death of Menander, that is, in Ol. 122. 3, B. C. 289, so that his time falls just at the era in Greek literary history which is marked by the accession of Ptolemy Philadelphus (Suid. s. v.).
  Of the events of the poet's life nothing is known; but his portrait is preserved to us in the beautiful sitting statue in the Vatican, which, with the accompanying statue of Menander, is esteemed by Winckelmann and others as among the finest works of Greek sculpture which have come down to us.
  Athenaeus (xiv.) mentions a letter of the comic poet and grammarian, Lynceus of Samos, to Poseidippus.
In his language, Meineke has detected some new words, and old words in new senses, totally unknown to the best Attic writers.
  According to Suidas, he wrote forty plays, of which the following eighteen titles are preserved: Anablepon, Apokleiomene, Galates, Demotai, Hermaphroditos, Epistathmos, Ephesia, Kodon, Dokrides, Metapheromenoi, Murmex, Homoioi, Paidion, Pornodoskos, Suntrophoi, Philosophoi, Philopator, Choreuousai.. The extant fragments of these plays are not sufficient to enable us to form an accurate judgment of the poet's style; but it seems, from the titles, that some of his plays were of a licentious character. Gellius (ii. 23) mentions him among the Greek comedians who were imitated by the Latin poets.

2. An epigrammatic poet, who was probably a different person from the comic poet, since he is mentioned with the appellation ho epigrammatographos (Schol. in Apoll. Rhod. i. 1289). He seems, however, to have lived about the same time as the comic poet, since Zeno and Cleanthes, who were contemporary with the latter, are mentioned in one of his epigrams (No. 11), and another epigram (No. 21) is upon the temple which Ptolemy Philadelphus erected in honour of his sister and wife Arsinoe. He is several times referred to by Athenaeus, Stephanus Byzantinus, and the grammarians. His epigrams formed a part of the Garland of Meleager, who appears to mention him as a Sicilian (Prooem. 45, 46); and twenty-two of them are preserved in the Greek Anthology; but some of these are also ascribed to Asclepiades and Callimachus. One of his epigrams, that on the statue of Opportunity by Lysippus (No. 13), is imitated by Ausonius (Epig. 12).
Athenaeus (xiii.) quotes the Aithiopia of Poseidippus, and elsewhere his Asopia, which seem to have been epic poems, and which Schweighauser is probably right in referring to the author of the epigrams.

3. An historian, who wrote a work respecting Cnidus, which contained several particulars respecting the Venus of Praxiteles. (Clem. Alex. Protrept.; Arnob. vi. 13.) He is also cited by Tzetzes, who concludes his quotation with an epigram by Poseidippus (Chil. vii. 144). From this and other circumstances it appears very probable that this historian was the same person as the epigrammatist.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited July 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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