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Listed 12 sub titles with search on: The inhabitants for destination: "LIBYA Country NORTH AFRICA".


The inhabitants (12)

Names of the inhabitants

Libyans

The independent, Nasamonians the most distant of, cross over to Sardinia, inhabit Corsica, come to Sicily from Carthage, Libyans of Motye in Sicily.


Libyans

Perseus Project Index. Total results on 14/6/2001: 116 for Libyans.


Ancient tribes

Marmarids

Tribe of Libyan nomads.


Nasamones

A Libyan people near Cyrene, story of their passage of the Libyan desert, their customs.


Adyimachidae

  Adyimachidae (Adurmachidai), a people of N. Africa, mentioned by Herodotus as the first Libyan people W. of Egypt. (Herod. iv. 168.) Their extent was from the frontier of Egypt (that is, according to Herodotus, from the Sinus Plinthinetes (ii. 6), but according to Scylax (p. 44, Hudson), from the Canopic mouth of the Nile), to the harbour of Plynos, near the Catabathmus Major. Herodotus distinguishes them from the other Libyan tribes in the E. of N. Africa, who were chiefly nomade (iv. 191), by saying that their manners and customs resembled those of the Egyptians (iv. 168). He also mentions some remarkable usages which prevailed amongst them (l. c.). At a later period they are found further to the S., in the interior of Marmarica. (Ptol.; Plin. v. 6; Sil. Ital. iii. 278, foll., ix. 223, foll.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited October 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Ausenses, Auseis

  Ausences (Auseis), a Libyan people, in North Africa, dwelling about the lake Tritonis at the bottom of the Lesser Syrtis, next to the Machlyes. The Machlyes were on the S. side of the lake, and the Ausenses on the N. (E. and W. respectively, according to the view of Herodotus), the river Triton being the boundary between them: the latter people, therefore, were in the S. of the district afterwards called Byzacena. (Herod. iv. 180.) Herodotus makes them the last of the nomade peoples towards the W., their neighbours on that side, the Maxyes being an agricultural people. (Herod. iv. 191: it is hardly necessary to notice Rennell's allusion to, and obviously correct solution of, an inconsistency which the hypercritic may fancy between this passage and c. 186: Rennell, Geog.to Herod. vol. ii. p. 302.) The Machlyes, says Herodotus, wear the hair on the back of the head, but the Ausenses on the front. The Ausenses celebrated a yearly festival of Athena, whom they claimed as their native goddess, in which their virgins were divided into two parties, which fought each other with stones and clubs, and those who died of their wounds were esteemed not true virgins. The combat was preceded by a procession, in which the most beautiful of the virgins was decorated with a Corinthian helmet and a full suit of Grecian armour, and was drawn in a chariot round the lake. (Comp. Mela, i. 7.)
  The Ausenses are supposed by Pacho (Voyage dans la Marnarique, &c.) to be the same people as the Ausurii, who are mentioned by Synesius as devastating Cyrenaica in the 6th century. (Bahr, ad Herod. l. c.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited October 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Autololes

  Autololes or Autololae (Autolalai, Ptol. iv. 6. § 17; common reading Autolatai), a Gaetulian people on the W. coast of Africa, in the Libya Interior of Ptolemy, both N. and S. of the Atlas, with a city Autolala, or Autolalae (Autolala, Autolalai). This city is one of Ptolemy's points of astronomical observation, having the longest day 13 1/2 hrs., being distant 3 1/2 hrs. W. of Alexandreia, and having the sun vertical once a year, at the time of the winter solstice. (Ptol. iv. 6. § 24; viii. 16. § 4.) Reichard takes it for the modern Agulon, or Aquilon. (Kleine Geogr. Schriften, p. 506.) All writers, except Ptolemy, call the people Autololes. (Plin. v. 1; Solin. 24; Lucan. Phars. iv. 677; Sil. Ital. iii. 306; Claudian. Laud. Stilich. i. 356.)
  Ptolemy (iv. 6. § 33) mentions, in the Western Ocean, an island called Autolala, or Junonis Insula (Heras he kai Autolala nesos), as distinct from the Fortunatae group. Some take it for Madeira, but this is very uncertain.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited October 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Perorsi


Machlyes

(Machlues, Herod. iv. 179; Ptol. iv. 3. § 26. vulg. Machrues), a Libyan people, in the S. of Africa Propria (Byzacena), on the river Triton, and separated by the lake Tritonis from the Lotophagi, like whom they fed upon the lotus. (Comp. Plin. vii. 2.)


Maxyes

  Maxyes (Maxues, Herod. iv. 191, where the name should be Mazues; a Libyan tribe, and a branch of the nomad Ausenses Herodotus (l. c.) places them on the other side, i. e. the W. bank, of the river Triton: reclaimed from nomad life, they were tillers of the earth, and accustomed to live in houses. They still, however, retained some relics of their former customs, as they suffer the hair on the right side of their heads to grow, but shave the left; they paint their bodies with red-lead: remains of this custom of wearing the hair are still preserved among the Tuaryks, their modern descendants. (Hornemann, Trav. p. 109.) They were probably the same people as those mentioned by Justin (xviii. 7), and called Maxytani, whose king is said to have been Hiarbas (Virg. Aen. iv. 36, 196, 326), and to have desired Dido for his wife. (Heeren, African Nations, vol. i. p. 34, trans.; Rennell, Geog. of Herod. vol. ii. p. 303.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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