The inhabitants MAKEDONIA EAST & THRACE (Region) GREECE - GTP - Greek Travel Pages

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Listed 22 sub titles with search on: The inhabitants  for wider area of: "MAKEDONIA EAST & THRACE Region GREECE" .


The inhabitants (22)

Ancient authors' reports

Ancient tribes

Dentheletae

DENTHELITIKI (Ancient area) KAVALA
Dentheletae (Dentheletai, Strab. vii. p. 318; Danthaletai, Steph. B.; Denseletae, Cic. in Pis. 34; Plin. iv. 11), a Thracian people who occupied a district called, after them, Dentheletica (Dantheletike, Ptol. iii. 11. § 8), which seems to have bordered on that occupied by the Maedi towards the SE., near the sources of the Strymon. Philip, son of Demetrius, in his fruitless expedition to the summit of Mount Haemus after rejoining his camp in Maedica, made an incursion into the country of the Dentheletae, for the sake of provision. (Liv. xl. 22.) (Comp. Polyb. xxiv. 6; Dion Cass. li. 23 ; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 474.)

Maedi

MEDIKI (Ancient country) KAVALA
  Maedi (Maidoi, Maidoi, Thue. ii. 98; Polyb. x. 41), a powerful people in the west of Thrace, dwelling near the sources of the Axius and Margus, and upon the southern slopes of Mt. Scomius. (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 472.) Strabo says that the Maedi bordered eastward on the Thunatae of Dardania (vii. p. 316), and that the Axius flowed through their territory (vii. p. 331). The latter was called Maedica (Maidike, Ptol. iii. 11. § 9; Liv. xxvi. 25, xl. 22). They frequently made incursions into Macedonia; but in B.C. 211, Philip V. invaded their territory, and took their chief town Iamphorina, which is probably represented by Vrania or Ivorina, in the upper valley of the Margus or Morava. (Liv. xxvi. 25.) We also learn from Livy (xl. 22) that the same king traversed their territory in order to reach the summit of Mt. Haemus; and that on his return into Macedonia he received the submission of Petra, a fortress of the Maedi. Among the other places in Maedica, we read of Phragandae (Liv. xxvi. 25) and Desudaba, probably the modern Kumanovo, on one of the confluents of the upper Axius. (Liv. xliv. 26.) The Maedi are said to have been of the same race as the Bithynians in Asia, and were hence called Maedobithyni (Steph. B. s. v. Maidoi; Strab. vii. p. 295). (Comp. Strab. vii. p. 316; Plin. iv. 11. s. 18.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Odomanti

ODOMANTIKI (Ancient area) KAVALA
  Odomanti (Odomantoi, Herod. vii. 112; Thuc. ii. 101, v. 6; Steph. B. s. v.; Odomantes, Plin. iv. 18), a Paeonian tribe, who occupied the district, called after them, Odomantice (Odomantike, Ptol. iii. 13. § 31; Liv. xliv. 4; Odomantis, Steph. B.) This tribe were settled upon the whole of the great mountain Orbelus, extending along the NE. of the lower Strymonic plain, from about Meleniko and Demirissar to Zikhnd inclusive, where they bordered on Pangaeus, the gold and silver mines of which they worked with the Pieres and Satrae. (Herod. l. c.) Secure in their inaccessible position, they defied Megabazus. (Herod. v. 16.) The NW. portion of their territory lay to the right of Sitalces as he crossed Mt. Cercine; and their general situation agrees with the description of Thucydides (ii. 101), according to whom they dwelt beyond the Strymon to the N., that is to say, to the N. of the Lower Strymon, where, alone, the river takes such a course to the E. as to justify the expression. Cleon invited Polles, their chieftain, to join him with as many Thracian mercenaries as could be levied. (Thuc. v. 6; Aristoph. Acharn. 156, 164; Suid. s. v. apotethriaken; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. pp. 210, 306, 465.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Odonianti

PAGGAIO (Mountain) KAVALA
Odonianti, a Thracian or Paeonian tribe inhabiting the range of Pangaeum (if the reading be right): Hdt. 5.16, Hdt. 7.112

Satrae

Satrae SATRAE (Satrai, Herod. vii. 110--112), a Thracian people who occupied a portion of the range of the Pangaeus,between the Nestus and the Strymon. Herodotus states that they were the only Thracian tribe who had always preserved their freedom; a fact for which he accounts by the nature of their country,--a mountainous region, covered with forests and snow--and by their great bravery. They alone of the Thracians did not follow in the train of Xerxes, when marching towards Greece. The Satrae were in possession of an oracle of Dionysus, situated among the loftiest mountain peaks, and the interpreters of which were taken from among the Bessi,--a circumstance which has suggested the conjecture that the Satrae were merely a clan of the Bessi,--a notion which is rendered more probable by the fact Republic. that Herodotus is the only ancient writer who mentions them; whereas the Bessi are repeatedly spoken of. We may infer from Pliny's expression, Bessorum multa nomina (iv. 11. s. 18), that the Bessi were divided into many distinct clans. Herodotus says that to the Satrae belonged the principal part of the gold and silver mines which then existed in the Pangaeus.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited July 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sapei

  Sapei (Sapaioi or Sapaioi), a Thracian people, occupying the southern portion of the Pangaeus, in the neighbourhood of Abdera. (Strab. xii. p. 549.) In this passage, however, Strabo calls them Sapae (Sapai), and assumes their identity with the Sinti, which in another place (x. p. 457) he treats as a mere matter of conjecture. The Via Egnatia ran through their country, and especially through a narrow and difficult defile called by Appian (B.C. iv. 87, 106) the pass of the Sapaei, and stated by him to be 18 miles from Philippi; so that it must have been nearly midway between Neapolis and Abdera. The Sapaei are mentioned, and merely mentioned, by Herodotus (vii. 110) and by Pliny (iv. 11. s. 18). Their town is called Sapaica (Sapaike) by Steph. B. (s. v.).

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Satrae

  Satrae (Satrai, Herod. vii. 110-112), a Thracian people who occupied a portion of the range of the Pangaeus, between the Nestus and the Strymon. Herodotus states that they were the only Thracian tribe who had always preserved their freedom; a fact for which he accounts by the nature of their country, -a mountainous region, covered with forests and snow- and by their great bravery. They alone of the Thracians did not follow in the train of Xerxes, when marching towards Greece. The Satrae were in possession of an oracle of Dionysus, situated among the loftiest mountain peaks, and the interpreters of which were taken from among the Bessi, -a circumstance which has suggested the conjecture that the Satrae were merely a clan of the Bessi, -a notion which is rendered more probable by the fact Republic. that Herodotus is the only ancient writer who mentions them; whereas the Bessi are repeatedly spoken of. We may infer from Pliny's expression, Bessorum multa nomina (iv. 11. s. 18), that the Bessi were divided into many distinct clans. Herodotus says that to the Satrae belonged the principal part of the gold and silver mines which then existed in the Pangaeus.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Gradual decrease of the population

Inhabitants' origin

Pomaki

AGRIANI (Village) DIDYMOTICHO
According to linguistic research, there are Greek elements in their language, which is a Slavic dialect. Some suggest that the Pomaki are the descendants of the Agrianes, an ancient tribe, whose name was preserved in this village.

Pontos

ELEOHORI BEACH (Beach) KAVALA

MANI (Small town) DIDYMOTICHO
According to the local traditions they are settlers from Mani of Peloponnesos

Links

Names of the inhabitants

Abderites, Abderite

AVDIRA (Ancient city) XANTHI
Abderita. A name generally applied to the "laughing philosopher" Democritus, as being a native of Abdera.

Maroneis

MARONIA (Ancient city) RODOPI
(Strabo 8, Fr.47)

Pieres

PIERIS (Ancient area) GREECE
  Pieres, a Thracian people, occupying the narrow strip of plain land, or low hill, between the mouths of the Peneius and the Haliacmon, at the foot of the great woody steeps of Olympus. (Thuc. ii. 99; Strab. vii. p. 331, Fr. 22, ix. p. 410; Liv. xliv. 9.) This district, which, under the name of Pieria or Pieris, is mentioned in the Homeric poems (Il. xiv. 225), was, according to legend, the birthplace of the Muses (Hesiod. Theog. 53) and of Orpheus, the father of song. (Apoll. Argon. i. 23.) When this worship was introduced into Boeotia, the names of the mountains, grots, and springs with which this poetic religion was connected, were transferred from the N. to the S. Afterwards the Pieres were expelled from their original seats, and driven to the N. beyond the Strymon and Mount Pangaeus, where they formed a new settlement. (Herod. vii. 112; Thuc. l. c.) The boundaries which historians and geographers give to this province vary. In the systematic geography of Ptolemy (iii. 13. § 15) the name is given to the extent of coast between the mouths of the Ludias and the Haliacmon. Pieria was bounded on the W. from the contiguous district of the Thessalian Perrhaebia by the great chain of Olympus. An offshoot from Olympus advances along the Pierian plain, in a NW. direction, as far as the ravine of the Haliacmon, where the mountains are separated by that chasm in the great eastern ridge of Northern Greece from the portion of it anciently called Bermius. The highest summit of the Pierian range called Pierus Mons (Plin. iv. 15; comp. Pausan. ix. 29. § 3; x. 13. § 5) rises about 8 miles to the N. of Vlakholivadho, and is a conspicuous object in all the country to the E. It would seem that there was a city called Pieria (Pieria: Eth. Pieriotes, Pierites, Piereus, Steph. B.; Suid. s. v. Kriton), which may be represented by a tumulus, overgrown with trees upon the extremity of the ridge of Andreotissa, where it ends in a point between Dium and Pydna, the other two chief cities of Pieria. Beyond Pydna was a considerable forest, called Pieria Silva (Liv. xliv. 43), which may have furnished the Pierian pitch, which had such a high reputation. (Herod. iv. 195; Plin. xiv. 25.) The road from Pella to Larissa in Thessaly passed through Pieria, and was probably the route which the consul Q. Marcius Philippus pursued in the third and fourth years of the Persic War. (Liv. xliv. 1-10; Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. pp. 177, 210, 337, 413, 446.)

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited September 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Sapaeans

SAPES (Ancient area) RODOPI
Attacked by Perseus, king of Macedonia, mentioned by Archilochus.

Nations & tribes

Agrianes

AGRIANES (Ancient area) GREECE
Agrianes, a Paeonian people, dwelling near the sources of the Strymon. They formed excellent light-armed troops, and are frequently mentioned in the campaigns of Alexander the Great. (Strab. p. 331; Herod. v. 16; Thuc. ii. 96; Arrian, Anab. i. 1. § 11, i. 5. § 1, et alib.)

Refugees from Bulgaria

Refugees of 1922

Remarkable selections

Orescii

PAGGAIO (Mountain) KAVALA
  Orescii (Orrheskioi), a people of Macedonia or Thrace, known only from their coins. These have been by some writers referred to the Orestae; but it is more probable, as suggested by Leake, that they were one of the Thracian tribes who worked the silver mines of Pangaeum; a circumstance which will account for our finding silver coins of large size and in considerable numbers struck by a people so obscure that their name is not mentioned by any ancient author (Leake, Northern Greece, vol. iii. p. 213, Numismata Hellenica, p. 81.) The coins in question) one of which is annexed, closely resemble in style and fabric those of, the Bisaltae and Edoni in the same neighbourhood.

This text is from: Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography (1854) (ed. William Smith, LLD). Cited August 2004 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks


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