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Location information

Listed 8 sub titles with search on: Location characteristics for wider area of: "SOUTH AEGEAN Region GREECE" .


Location characteristics (8)

Ancient authors' reports

Rhodes is a diamond shaped island, and it measures 78 km in length and 30 km in width, making it the fourth largest island in Greece, preceded only by Crete, Euboea, and Lesbos. It is part of the volcanic island arc that extends from the Peloponnese through Crete and Karpathos to Asia Minor. Rhodes is only 20 km from the mainland of Asia Minor. The rock-rose is so plentiful and exuberant that Rhodes is often called the "Island of Roses."

This extract is cited Oct 2002 from Perseus Project URL bellow, which contains interesting hyperlinks


Listed Traditional Settlements

EMBORIOS (Settlement) SYMI

(Following URL information in Greek only)


PANORMITIS (Village) SYMI


PEDI (Settlement) SYMI

(Following URL information in Greek only)


Remarkable surf areas

FILIZI (Small island) PAROS


Special characteristics compared to other location

OIA (Community) SANTORINI

Member of the Communities of Hellenes

Members of the Communities of Hellenes are:
Ambelakia in Larissa
Makrinitsa in Pelion
Nymfeo in Florina
Oia in Santorini
Panormos in Tinos
Papigo in Zagori


PANORMOS (Community) TINOS

Member of the Communities of Hellenes

Members of the Communities of Hellenes are:
Ambelakia in Larissa
Makrinitsa in Pelion
Nymfeo in Florina
Oia in Santorini
Panormos in Tinos
Papigo in Zagori


TINOS (Island) KYKLADES

Dovecots

  Dovecots, or pigeon houses, are the main traditional feature on the island.
  These lovely, eye-catching constructions are examples of the inspiration and creativity of folk art. They are usually built of slate. Local artists design the mostly geometric patterns. The style may vary but always remains harmonious, creating structures that often resemble embroidery.   They are mostly built on slopes or in gullies. The ground floor is used as a storehouse for farming tools and supplies. The upper floor is used to house pigeons.
  Tinos counts about 1.000 dovecots, carefully maintained and spread all over the island. Those situated in the valley of Tarampadou are especially impressive. Most of them were built in the Venetian period, during the 18th and 19th century.


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Ferry Departures
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