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for destination:  "KYZIKOS , Ancient city , TURKEY " .
Biographies (12)
   Historians (1)
   Poets (2)
   Astronomers (2)
   Painters (2)
   Generals (1)
   Geographers (2)
   Mathematicians (1)
   Philosophers (1)

Biographies (12)

 Historians
Agathocles, 3rd c. B.C.
Agathocles (Agathokles), a Greek historian, who wrote the history of Cyzicus (peri Kuzikou). He is called by Athenaeus both a Babylonian and a Cyzican. He may originally have come from Babylon, and have settled at Cyzicus. The first and third books are referred to by Athenaeus (ix. p., xii.). The time at which Agathocles lived is unknown, and his work is now lost; but it seems to have been extensively read in antiquity, as it is referred to by Cicero (de Div. i. 24), Pliny and other ancient writers. Agathocles also spoke of the origin of Rome (Festus, s. v. Romam; Solinus, Polyh. 1). The scholiast on Apollonius (iv. 761) cites Memoirs (hupomnemata) by an Agathocles, who is usually supposed to be the same as the above-mentioned one.
  There are several other writers of the same name. 1. Agathocles of Atrax, who wrote a work on fishing (halieutika, Suidas, s. v. Kikilios). 2. Of Chios, who wrote a work on agriculture (Varro and Colum. de Re Rust. i. 1; Plin. H. N. xxii. 44). 3. Of Miletus, who wrote a work on rivers (Plut. de Fluv) 4. Of Samos, who wrote a work on the constitution of Pessinus.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
 Poets
Automedon, 1st c. A.D.
Automedon, of Cyzicus, a Greek epigrammatic poet, twelve of whose epigrams are contained in the Greek Anthology (v. 129, x. 23, xi. 29, 46, 50, 319, 324-326, 346, 361, xii. 34). He must have lived in the first century of the Christian era, as one of his poems is addressed to Nicetes, a distinguished orator in the reign of Nerva. One of the epigrams usually attributed to Theocritus has in the manuscript the inscription Automedontos Aitolou: if this is correct there must have been an Aetolian poet of the name of Automedon.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
Erycius
Erycius, (Erukios), the name of two poets, whose epigrams are in the Greek Anthology. The one is called a Cyzicene, the other a Thessalian; and, from the internal evidence of the epigrams, it is probable that the one lived in the time of Sulla, and about B. C. 84, the other under the emperor Hadrian. Their epigrams are so mixed up, that it is impossible to distinguish accurately between them, and we cannot even determine which of the two poets was the elder, and which the younger. We only know that the greater number of the epigrams are of a pastoral nature, and belong to Erycius of Cyzicus. (Brunck, Anal. vol. ii.; Jacobs, Anth. Graec. vol. iii., vol. xiii. ; Fabric. Bibl. Graec. vol. iv.)

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
 Astronomers
Callippus or Calippus
Callipus of Cyzicus (fl. c. 370 BC). Astronomer
Life
Studied in Cyzicus (Asia Minor) with Ptolemarchus, a friend of Eudoxus, whom he succeeded as head of the school. Later he went to Athens, where he studied with Aristotle. One of the craters on the moon has been named "Callippus" in his honour.
Work
Callippus developed and perfected the system of concentric spheres proposed by Eudoxus, adding seven more spheres - one for each of the planets (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn) and one each for the sun and the moon, both then considered planets - for a total of 34. He made detailed observations of the rising and setting of the fixed stars, especially the "dawn-risers" and "evening-setters". His calculation of the duration of the seasons - Spring 94 days, Summer 92, Autumn 89, Winter 90 - was accurate to within 0.08 - 0.44 days. He improved on Meton's 19-year luni-solar calendar, introducing the 76-year (4 x 19) cycle named after him, which skipped one day every 76 years, and gave a year of 365.25 days and a month of 29.53. His sole known work, "On the System of the Planets", is lost.

This text is based on the Greek book "Ancient Greek Scientists", Athens, 1995 and is cited Sep 2005 from The Technology Museum of Thessaloniki URL below.

http://www.tmth.edu.gr/en/aet/2/22.html
370 - 310
Callippus or Calippus (Kallippos or Kalippos), an astronomer of Cyzicus. He was a disciple of one of Eudoxus' friends, and followed him to Athens, where he became acquainted [p. 575] with Aristotle (who mentions him Metaph. xi. 8), and assisted that philosopher in rectifying and completing the discoveries of Eudoxus (Simplic. in lib. II. de Coel). His observations are frequently referred to by Geminus and Ptolemy in their meteorological calendars, and were probably made at Cyzicus, since Ptolemy says, that Callippus observed at the Hellespont. Such calendars were fixed in public places, for common use, and hence called parapegmata: they record the times of the different risings and settings of the fixed stars, with the episemasiai, or principal changes in the weather supposed to be connected with them, as deduced from the observations of various astronomers. Callippus invented the period or cycle of 76 years, called after him the Callippic. Several attempts had been previously made to discover intervals of time of moderate length, which should be expressible in whole numbers by means of each of the three natural units of time--the solar year, the lunar month, and the solar day: and, in particular, Meton, about a century before, had observed the remarkable approximation to equality between 19 years and 235 months, and had introduced the celebrated cycle of 19 years, which he also assumed to contain 6940 days. This would make the year = 365 5/19 days; and, therefore, Callippus, observing that the difference between this and the more correct value 365 1/4 was 5/19 - 5/20 = 1/4 x 19 = 1/76, proposed to quadruple the Metonic period, and then subtract one day. He supposed, that 76 years = 940 months = 27759 days; both of which suppositions are considerably nearer the truth than Meton's (Geminus, El. Ast. cap. 6, Uranolog.). If we take the mean values of the year and month, in days, to be 365.2422414 and 29.5305887215 respectively, then 76 years =27758d 9h 50m 54s, and 940 months = 27758d 18h 4m 54s nearly; but these numbers would not be strictly accurate in the time of Callippus.
  The Callippic period seems to have been generally adopted by astronomers in assigning the dates of their observations; and the frequent use which Ptolemy makes of it enables us to fix the epoch of the beginning of the first period with considerable certainty. It must have begun near the time of the summer solstice, since Ptolemy refers to an observation of that solstice made at the end of the 50th year (toin hetel legonti) of the first period (meg. suntax. iii. 2); and out of a number of other observations recorded by the same writer, all but two, according to Ideler, indicate the year B. C. 330, whilst four of them require the evening of June 28 for the epoch in question. It is not certain at what time the period came into civil use; it would naturally be employed not to supersede, but to correct from time to time, the Metonic reckoning. The inaccuracy of the latter must have become quite sensible in B. C. 330; and it is evident, from the praise which Diodorus (xii. 36) bestows upon it, that it could not have remained uncorrected down to his time.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Nov 2005 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per...
 Painters
Androcydes
Androcydes (Androkudes), of Cyzicus, a Greek painter, a contemporary and rival of Zeuxis, flourished from 400 to 377 B. C. (Plin. xxxv. 36.3). He painted, partly on the spot and partly in Thebes, a skirmish of horse which took place near Plataeae shortly before the battle of Leuctra (Plut. Pelop. 25), and a picture of Scylla surrounded by fishes. The latter picture was much praised for the beauty of the fishes, on which the artist was supposed to have bestowed the more pains, on account of his being fond of fish (Plut. Quaest. Conv. iv. 4.2; Polemo, ap. Athen. viii.)
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
Lala
Lala of Cyzicus, a female painter, who lived at Rome at the time when M. Varro was a young man (about B. C. 74). She painted with the pencil, and also practised encaustic painting on ivory with the cestrum. Her subjects were principally pictures of women, among which was her own portrait, painted at a mirror. No painter surpassed her in speed. Her works were so highly esteemed as to be preferred to those of Sopolis and Dionysius, whose pictures filled the galleries at Rome. She was never married. (Plin. H. N. xxxv. 11. s. 40. Β§ 43.) It is useless to discuss the inferences drawn from the various reading, inventa for juventa, as there is no authority in any MS. for that reading; and it can hardly be made to give a good meaning.

This text is from: A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology, 1873 (ed. William Smith). Cited Oct 2006 from The Perseus Project URL below, which contains interesting hyperlinks

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per...
 Generals
Apollodorus
Apollodorus of Cyzicus, lived previous to the time of Plato, who in his dialogue Ion, mentions him as one of the foreigners whom the Athenians had frequently placed at the head of their armies. This statement is repeated by Aelian (V.H. xiv. 5), but in what campaigns Apollodorus served the Athenians is not known. Athenaeus (xi. p. 506), in censuring Plato for his malignity, mentions Apollodorus, and the other foreigners enumerated in the passage of the Ion, as instances of persons calumniated by the philosopher, although the passage does not contain a trace of anything derogatory to them.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
 Geographers
Eudoxus
Eudoxus. Of Cyzicus, a geographer, who went from his native place to Egypt, and was employed by Ptolemy Evergetes and his wife Cleopatra in voyages to India; but afterwards, being robbed of all his property by Ptolemy Lathyrus, he sailed away down the Red Sea, and at last arrived at Gades. He afterwards made attempts to circumnavigate Africa in the opposite direction, but without success. (Strab. ii.; Plin. ii. 67.) He must have lived about B. C. 130.
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
  Eudoxos. Sea farer from Kyzikos, who lived in the 2nd century BC.
  While in Alexandria, he one day met an Indian sailor whose ship had sunk. The Indian told him how to sail to India, and Eudoxos got so excited about this that he convinced the king of Egypt, Ptolemaios VIII, to sponsor the expedition. When Eudoxos returned his ship was loaded with spices and precious stones, which the king greedily confiscated.
  Eudoxos set out later again for yet another trip to India, but this time his ship sunk just outside Ethiopia. This gave Eudoxos the idea to sail around Africa in order to reach India. Just south of Morocco the ship ran ashore, but Eudoxos made it back to Alexandria. On his third trial he supposedly was successful though.

This text is cited Sept 2003 from the In2Greece URL below.

http://www.in2greece.com/english/historymyth/histo... English
 Mathematicians
Athenaeus
Athenaeus (Athenaios), a contemporary of Archimedes, the author of an extant work Peri Mechanematon (on warlike engines), addressed to Marcellus (probably the conqueror of Syracuse). He is perhaps the same with Athenaeus of Cyzicus, mentioned by Proclus (in Euclid.) as a distinguished mathematician. The above-mentioned work is printed in Thevenot's Mathematici Veteres, Paris, 1693
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)
 Philosophers
Helicon
Helicon, (Helikon), a native of Cyzicus, a friend and disciple of Plato. He was for some time a resident at the court of Dionysius the Younger, and was presented by him with a talent of silver for having correctly predicted an eclipse of the sun. (Plut. Dion. p. 966.) According to Suidas (s. v.), he wrote a work entitled Apotelesmata, and a treatise Peri Diosemeion
http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/cgi-bin/ptext?doc=Per... English
A dictionary of Greek and Roman biography and mythology (ed. William Smith)

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